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What are mandatory technical restrictions imposed on fixed service applications by the RR?

There are 3 groups of limitations. Firstly, there is a prohibition to use F3E and G3E emission in the fixed service below 30 MHz (RR24.2). Secondly, there are few power limits in footnotes of Article 5 of the RR mainly in HF bands, for example RR5.137. Thirdly, there are mandatory limits of the radiated power and power to antenna for fixed service stations above 1 GHz sharing the bands with space services, which are  listed in RR21.3 – 21.7 of Article 21 of the RR.

What are mandatory technical restrictions imposed on land mobile service applications by the RR?

There are very few such restrictions. They include mandatory limits of the radiated power and power to antenna for land mobile stations above 1 GHz sharing the bands with space services, which are  listed in RR21.3 – 21.7, as well as power limitations for RLAN applications in the bands 5150 – 5350 MHz and 5470 – 5725 MHz contained in Resolution 229 (Rev.WRC-12)

What frequency bands can be used for High Altitude Platform Stations (HAPS)?

HAPS can use the following frequency bands: (a) 1885 – 1980 MHz, 2010 – 2025 MHz and 2110 – 2170 MHz for base stations in the mobile service according to RR5.388A and Resolution 221(Rec.WRC-07); (b) 6440 – 6520 MHz and 6560 -  6640 MHz for HAPS gateway links in countries listed in RR5.457 and pursuant to Resolution 150 (WRC-12); (c)  27.9 – 28.2 GHz and 31 – 31.3 GHz for HAPS in the fixed service in countries listed in RR5.537A and 5.543A and pursuant to Resolution 145 (Rev.WRC-12); (d) 47.2 – 47.5 GHz and 47.9 – 48.2 GHz for HAPS in the fixed service pursuant to Resolution 122 (Rev.WRC-07).

What is the purpose of planning frequency bands?

Planning of frequency bands, through establishing of frequency allotment or assignment plans, represent a key mechanism for preserving the rights of all Member States for equitable access to the frequency spectrum. These plans provide for an orderly use of the frequencies in the relevant bands. Each plan is normally accompanied with a plan modification and notification procedures, which allow to satisfy new particular operational requirements, which are not met by the Plans, while preserving the integrity of the Plans themselves.
There are two types of plans:
• worldwide plans, that are applicable to the whole world; and
• regional plans, that are applicable to some areas only (“planning areas”, e.g., Region 1, European Broadcasting Area, African Broadcasting Area, European maritime Area).

What is the difference between “assignment Plan”  and “allotment Plan”?

In Assignment Plan a frequency is authorized for use by specified stations. Stations using the same frequency are separated by distances large enough to provide interference-free operation. Distributing frequency to stations is called “assignment” resulting in term “assignment Plan”.
In Allotment Plan a frequency is authorized for use in specified geographical areas or countries. These areas are separated by the distances allowing re-use of the same frequency. Later, administrations responsible for such areas assign frequencies to any station located in these areas. Distributing frequency to areas is called “allotment” resulting in term “allotment Plan”.

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