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ICTs for a Sustainable World #ICT4SDG

Programme

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​AI for Good Global Summit
Geneva, Switzerland, 7-9 June 2017

Please follow the Summit via Webcast​.

 

Day 1, 7 June 2017​

Social events and breaks are kindly sponsored by:
Gold Sponsors:
KFF          Word 4App
Corporate Sponsor:

09:30 - 1​0:00 Welcome Address, Popov Room
The hosts, ITU and XPRIZE, set the goals and opportunities in collaborating for a better future with Artificial Intelligence.
Moderator: Stephen Ibaraki, Social Entrepreneur and Futurist [ Biography ]
10:00 - 10:45Opening Keynotes: ‘Moonshots’ - Inspiration for the Future, Popov Room
Distinguished keynote speakers from industry and academia will share their ‘moonshots’ for the future of Artificial Intelligence.

Inaugural moonshot keynote: Inspirations about the future: Moderator:Marcus Shingles, CEO, XPRIZE Foundation [ Biography ]​
10:45 - 11:15 Coffee break, Tower building, Outside Popov Room, -2nd floor
  
11:15 - 12:45Plenary 1: State of Play, Popov Room
Recent breakthroughs have driven rapid growth in massive data sets, storage capacity, computing power, and open APIs. These changes have fueled the development of machines that can do things that once relied solely on human experience, creativity, and ingenuity.

In the opening presentations of the summit, we explore perspectives of the current moment including how AI is affecting life and organizations.

Speakers: Moderator: Wendell Wallach, Consultant, Ethicist, and Scholar at Yale University's Interdisciplinary Center For Bioethics and Senior Advisor to The Hastings Center, and the World Economic Forum [ Biography ]
12:45 - 14:00 Lunch break 
Brown bag lunch offered to delegates, Tower building, Outside Popov Room, -2nd floor
 

14:00 - 15:30 Plenary 2: Transformations on the Horizon, Popov Room
Industry and academia are working towards the next generation of computers that can understand and learn from natural spoken language, full motion video, and more. Given how much the world is already changing, what can we expect from the next generation of Artificial Intelligence systems? How will these technologies affect the world?

Presenters will explore these global opportunities, transformations, and challenges.

Speakers: Moderator: Urs Gasser, Executive Director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University [ Biography ]
15:30 - 16:00 ​Coffee break, Tower building, Outside Popov room, -2nd floor
16:00 - 18:00 Plenary 3: Future Roadmap – Collaborating for Good, Popov Room
A wide range of voices have been debating the future of AI. A roadmap for governments, industry, academia, media, and civil society is critical to ensure that this technology develops in a safe, responsible, and ethical manner benefiting all segments of society.

The presenters and panelists will address the issues above and will introduce the role of the ‘Breakthrough Sessions’ taking place over the next two days of the Summit.

Speakers: Panel: Co-Moderators:
​18:30 - 20:00Reception, Montbrillant Cafeteria


Day 2, 8 June 2017 

Social events and breaks are kindly sponsored by:
Gold Sponsors:
KFF           Word 4App
Corporate Sponsor:

​09:00 - 10:00Plenary 4: Privacy, Security, Ethics and Societal Challenges, Popov Room
AI will have far-reaching effects on the future of society that could redefine global ethics, economics, and law.

This session will discuss the need for a guiding ethical framework and code of conduct to direct the design, production, and use of AI and robotics. The session will also explore the framework’s requirements in the areas of fundamental human rights, equality, justice, non-discrimination, privacy and social responsibility. These requirements center the role of the ‘Breakthrough Sessions’ taking place over the next two days of the Summit.

Speakers: Moderator: Stephen Cave, Executive Director, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence [ Biography ]
​​10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break​, Tower building, Outside Popov room, -2nd floor
10:30 - 12:00
​Breakthrough Groups on Privacy and Ethics​​Breakthrough Groups on Societal Challenges
Enhancing Privacy and Security 
Room H
Lead: UNICRI, OHCHR, Global Pulse

Moderator: Irakli Beridze, Senior Strategy and Policy Advisor, UNICRI [ Biography ]

Speakers:

​​Pane​lists:

Rapporteur: Sean McGregor, Oregon State University
Ethical dev​elopment of AI
Room K
Lead: Global Pulse, UNESCO, OHCHR

Moderator: Robert Kirkpatrick, Director, UN Global Pulse 
[ Biography ]

Speakers:
Panelists:
Future of Work
Popov Room
Lead: ILO, UNIDO, UNDESA

Moderator: Marie-Jose Bahnam, Sr. Director, Foundation Priorities, XPRIZE [ Biography ]

Speakers:
Panelists:
Rapporteur: Alexandre Cadain, CEO at Anima and co-lead of post-digital program at Ecole Normale Superieure​
Lead: Marie-Hélène Parizeau, Chair of UNESCO COMEST; Joseph Konstan, Professor, University of Minnesota​ 
[ Biography ]

Moderator: Joseph Konstan, Professor, University of Minnesota 
[ Biography ]

Panels:

Rapporteur: Joseph Konstan, Professor, University of Minnesota 
[ Biography ]

12:00 - 13:30 ​Lunch break
Brown bag lunch offered to delegates, Tower building, Outside Popov Room, -2nd floor
 

​13:30 - 14:00 Plenary 5: ‘Breakthrough’ Proposals on Privacy, Security, Ethics and Societal Challenges, Popov Room
The rapporteurs of the ‘breakthrough groups’ will present their proposals on near-term, practical applications of AI to solve the challenges presented in their sessions.
​14:00 - 15:00 Plenary 6: AI for Common Good and Sustainable Living, Popov Room
AI has the potential to yield enormous value in solving many of humanity’s grandest challenges and advancing the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. This session will explore how AI can accelerate and advance the development and democratization of solutions to promote common good and enable sustainable living.

Speakers: Moderator/Speaker: Thomas Wiegand, Executive Director, Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute and Professor, TU Berlin [ Biography ]
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break, Tower building, Outside Popov room, -2nd floor
15:30 - 17:00
Breakthrough Groups on Common Good​​Breakthrough Groups on Sustainable Living
AI for Prosperity
Room C
Lead: Yoshua Bengio, Professor, University of Montreal

Panelists:
Rapporteur: Sean McGregor, Oregon State University​

Social ​Good Data
Popov Room
Lead: Global Pulse, UNDESA

Moderator: Miguel Luengo-Oroz, Chief Data Scientist, UN Global Pulse 

Speaker:

Panelists: 
Rapporteur: Rene Clausen Nielsen, ‎Information Management Lead, IFRC
 


 Promoting Healthier Citizens
Room K
Lead: WHO

Moderator: Mohamed Alkady, President, Hart
[ Biography ]

Panelists: 
Rapporteur: Preetam Maloor​, Strategy and Policy Advisor, ITU

 Smart Cities and Communities
Room H
Lead: ITU, UNIDO

Co-Moderators:

Speaker:

Panelists:

Co-Rapporteurs: Michael Martin, Prize Manager, IBM Watson on AI, XPRIZE; Jose Maria Diaz Batanero, ITU
17:15 - 17:45 ​Plenary 7: ‘Breakthrough’ Proposals on Common Good and Sustainable Living, Popov Room
The rapporteurs of the ‘breakthrough groups’ will present their proposals on near-term, practical applications of AI to solve the challenges presented in their sessions.


Day 3, 9 June 2017 

Social events and breaks are kindly sponsored by:
Gold Sponsors:
KFF           Word 4App
Corporate Sponsor:

​09:00 - 10:00 Plenary 8:  Poverty Reduction and Capacity Building, Popov Room
This session will examine how AI can help end deprivation and the dangers of poverty. In addition, it will explore the opportunity for all countries to participate in the development and application of AI. The goal is to avoid expanding the “digital divide” into an “intelligence divide.”

Speakers:
Moderator: Anja KaspersenHead of Strategic Engagement and New Technologies, International Committee of the Red Cross​ [ Biography ]

​​10:00 - 10:30 Coffee break​, Tower building, Outside Popov room, -2nd floor
10:30 - 12:00
​​ Breakthrough Groups on Poverty Reduction Breakthrough Groups on Capacity Building
Ending Hunger
Room H
Lead: WFP, IFAD

Moderator: Robert Opp, Director, Innovation and Change Management, WFP [ Biography​ ]

Speaker:

Panelists:

Co-Rapporteurs: Johanna Jochim, Special Projects Manager, WFP; Jamie Green, Innovation Accelerator Projects Manager, WFP

 

Disaster Prevention and Relief
Room K
Lead: UNICEF

Moderator: Louise Story, New York Times 

Panelists:

Rapporteur: Paul Bunje, Chief Scientist, XPRIZE [ Biography ]

 

Education
Popov Room
Lead: UNESCO, UNITAR, WIPO, UNICRI

Co-Moderator: Alex Mejia, Senior Manager, UNITAR; Fengchun Miao, Chief of ICT in Education, UNESCO

Speakers:

Panelists:
​ Promoting Equality in Access to AI
Room C
Lead: OHCHR, UNIDO, ITU, Amnesty international

Moderator: Sherif Elsayed-Ali, Head of Technology and Human Rights, Amnesty International

Speakers:

​Panelists:
Rapporteur: Ahmed Motala, Human Rights Officer, OHCHR
​12:00 - 12:30 Plenary 9: ‘Breakthrough’ Proposals on Poverty Reduction and Capacity Building, Popov Room
The rapporteurs of the ‘breakthrough groups’ will present their proposals on near-term, practical applications of AI to solve the challenges presented in their session.
12:30 - 13:30 ​Lunch break
Brown bag lunch offered to delegates, Tower building, Outside Popov Room, -2nd floor
 

​13:30 - 14:00 Plenary 10: Investments, Economic Aspects and Designing the Future, Popov Room
Government, industry, academia, private sector and civil society need to work together to mitigate the risks posed by AI, ensuring that AI benefits all of humanity. This session will explore how Global partnerships inclusive of all segments of society will offer crucial support to the pursuit of this goal.

Speaker:
Moderator: Andy Chen, Board Chair, IEEE Computer Society [ Biography ] 
14:00 - 15:30
Breakthrough Groups on investment and Economic Aspects Breakthrough Groups on Designing the Future
I​nvesting for Impact with AI​
Room H
               
Lead: Ash Fontana, Managing Director, Zetta Ventures 
[ Biography ]

 
Moderator: Ash Fontana, Managing Director, Zetta Ventures Biography ]

 
Panelists: 
Rapporteur:Rigas Hadzilacos, Practice Lead, Knowledge Networks and Analysis, World Economic Forum (WEF) ​

KPI for Success​
Room K

Lead: XPRIZE 

 
Moderator: Chris Fabian, Co-Founder, UNICEF Innovation Biography ]​

Panelists: 
Rapporteur: Sean McGregor, Oregon State University

Lead: Lynne Parker, Professor, University of Tennessee-Knoxville
[ Biography ]

Panelists:
Rapporteur: Preetam Maloor​, Strategy and Policy Advisor, ITU
Roadmap for Collaboration​
Popov Room
               
  Lead: XPRIZE and ITU

 
Co-Moderators: Marie-Jose Bahnam, Sr. Director, Foundation Priorities, XPRIZE [ Biography ]Paul Bunje, Chief Scientist at XPRIZE [ Biography ]

 
Panelists: 
Rapporteurs: Marie-Jose Bahnam, Sr. Director, Foundation Priorities, XPRIZE [ Biography ]Paul Bunje, Chief Scientist at XPRIZE; XPRIZE Biography ]
 
​15:30 - 16:00 ​Coffee break, Tower building, Outside Popov room, -2nd floor
16:00 - 16:30 Plenary 11: ‘Breakthrough’ proposals on investments, economic aspects and designing the future, Popov Room
The rapporteurs of the ‘breakthrough groups’ will present their proposals on near-term, practical applications of AI to solve the challenges presented in their sessions.
16:30 - 17:45 Plenary 12: Closing Session - Applying AI for Good, Popov Room
Drawing on all of the proposals from the ‘Breakthrough Sessions’, the Summit will propose strategies for:
  1. Development of applications and systems that benefit humanity
  2. Identifying opportunities to pinpoint practical and impactful applications, with impact in the near term
  3. Identifying a roadmap for ethical, safe, and democratic access
  4. Ongoing UN ITU and XPRIZE inspired projects to support and monitor the practical implementations of AI for Good
Speakers:

Breakthrough Sessions

 

Enhancing Privacy and Security
AI has the potential to reveal detailed private information through embedded, mobile and wearable devices, advanced facial recognition and predictive analysis, leading to the questions of whether the current privacy and security standards can still protect and safeguard personal data, individual privacy and anonymity. The increasing security vulnerabilities will affect the application of AI technologies in a safe manner, in context of autonomous vehicles and drones, biomonitoring, healthcare robotics, or robots responsible for the maintenance of public order. As AI powered technologies can self-advance, leaving uncertainty in applying standard data protection principles of accountability, transparency, consent, control, how can we ensure that proper data privacy and data security measures and standards are in place. This session will aim to discuss and identify strategies to ensure that AI contributes to the global security and peace, protect individuals against unauthorized manipulation of AI algorithms and not create chaos.
[Updated on 1 June 2017]

Ethical development of AI
Algorithm-based machines increasingly learn from and autonomously interact with their environments, thereby developing unexplainable forms of decision making. In many ways this is just as much as a new frontier for ethics and risk assessment as it is for emerging technologies of AI. Should AI be able to make life-and-death decisions, for example, in deciding how autonomous vehicles behave in the moments preceding a crash? Where does the liability rest for harm caused by AI ?  How can we avoid the biases in decision-making by AI, causing inequalities and discrimination? How can we ensure that a world of increasingly pro-active computing remains human-centered, protecting human identity and dignity? This session will discuss the challenges of today's world posed by the use of AI and will aim to identify possible solutions that can ensure that the design and operation of AI is at minimum characterized by accountability and respect for human rights and purpose?
[Updated on 5 June, 2017]

Future of Work​
AI will eventually be capable of performing not just routine tasks but also the functions of doctors, lawyers, engineers and other professions reliant on expert judgement and specialized qualifications. How will AI's augmentation of jobs, elimination of jobs affect the quality of life enjoyed by human beings? Will AI's increasing influence on production processes reduce tax revenues to the detriment of social welfare systems, and is it time to revisit the concept of social welfare spending as more and more people hand over their jobs to machines?
[Updated on 1 June, 2017]

Humans and Machines​
​AI technology is enabling a wide range of new ways for humans and machines to interact, from intelligent and autonomous robots to smart spaces to natural language and even physical and cognitive human augmentation. ​These technologies, if well-deployed, can have enormous social impact, supporting independence, economic development and engagement, and cultural diversity. What are the most promising potential applications of novel human-machine interaction in the coming five to ten years, focusing on applications that can support disadvantaged individuals and communities?  And what are the associated risks of these technologies and the steps that developers, communities, and governments may need to take to regulate them to ensure that their good outweighs adverse impacts?
[Updated on 1 June 2017]

AI for​ Prosperity
AI will increase efficiency and productivity to an extent far beyond the current limitations of human labor. AI-powered automation may create factories full of workers that never sleep, eat, or expect pay for the day’s labor. As this type of production process yields higher economic output, how will we ensure that the associated financial gains do not accrue just to the owners of AI-powered machinery? How can we ensure developing nations can continue to develop towards prosperity?
Social Good Data
AI innovation will be central to the achievement of the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals by capitalizing on the unprecedented quantities of data now being generated by sensors, mobile and embedded devices/chips, IoT, and satellites related to sentiment behavior, human health, commerce, communications, migration and more. What are the datasets and practical means of capturing them, protecting them, and exploiting them with the greatest potential to deliver insight able to assist us meeting the grandest challenges facing humanity? How can we provide increased access to data sets that will provide great insight where protection of individuals and their anonymity is critical? And considering that data resources result from digitalization, a process many countries are only just beginning, how might we democratize access to the data-derived insight to inform future development strategies? Furthermore, what are the practical issues involved in deploying operational systems to support decision-making on the ground and at scale?
[Updated on 1 June, 2017]
Promoting Healthier Citizens
The practice of medicine is now augmented by AI systems that can process the entire history of recorded medical research and analyze large datasets of medical imagery. These systems guide evidence-based treatments and inform healthcare policy. Initial deployments of these AI medical systems are largely in the developed world, which further expands the gap between medical standards and practices around the world. What are the foundational requirements for extending AI-enhanced medicine to the developing world?
Smart Cities and Communities
The world needs to maintain quality of life for the billions of people living in increasingly dense, urban environments. Improvements in sensor technology, Internet connectivity, and autonomous vehicles will improve the capabilities for building “smart cities.” How will we improve the quality of urban life by improving the social and physical infrastructure of cities? How can corporations and governments work with AI technologies to improve communities?
Ending Hunger
The number of people inhabiting the earth is increasing far faster than the area of arable land. Solving the challenge of hunger requires smarter means of crop production and distribution. Improvements in satellite imagery, sensor data and the understanding of natural systems can feed into modern AI models. Technologies can help us to optimize crop yields, reduce water use and improve crop disease treatment. What are the most effective means of leveraging AI to improve food production and procurement for all people?
Disaster Prevention and Relief
The world is facing a series of shocks that have never been as compounded, or come as quickly, as they will over the next 15 years. These disasters can include catastrophic failures of climate including drought and flooding, massive loss of jobs due to automation, increased nationalism leading to conflict, and a connected world where disease spreads faster than ever. We will explore the impact and benefits of AI technologies and formulate strategies for preparedness and resilience of the human species for the changes that are to come.
[Updated on 1 June 2017]
Education
AI promises to boost all forms of education, enabling the personalization of education at scale. Wider access to networks and knowledge, peer learning capabilities, crowdsourcing new content and machine learning are driving significant advances in online learning and have enabled teachers in K-12 schools and higher education to multiply the size of their classrooms while addressing individual students' unique learning pace, needs and styles. The continued improvements of AI, however, may render current education systems obsolete, calling for dialogue and guidelines around global inclusion and access to knowledge and skills most relevant to the human experience of the future.
[Updated 1 June 2017]
Promoting Equality in access to AI
Artificial intelligence is beginning to play an increasing role in different facets of life including product design, diagnosing diseases, assessing credit risk, combating crime, promoting freedom of speech and democracy. While the world is increasingly benefiting from these advances, how can we have universally inclusive research and development and data respecting local culture, gender, race, and cultural and geographical realities? How can we ensure that AI applications promote equality rather than entrench bias? How can we provide an equitable basis for all the world's countries to expand their knowledge of AI and participate in the global scene of progress and innovation? Artificial Intelligence has vast potential, and this session will aim to identify strategies to allow everyone to participate in the next frontiers of human evolution. [Updated on 1 June 2017]
Investing for Impact with AI
We have a general, moral imperative to maintain the quality of life for people all around the world. This is difficult to satisfy as populations increase and resources decrease. However, machine learning technologies are particularly good at solving complex optimization problems. This session will focus on how to invest in machine learning technologies to solve significant, societal problems. The session will provide guidelines for allocating capital to such technologies in terms of finding large problems, allocating capital in underinvested areas and avoiding negative consequences. We will use the global resource allocation issues in the food, logistics and energy industries by way of example. This session is relevant to firms allocating assets to such technologies and practitioners considering how to apply their skills for maximum, global impact. This panel will identify guidelines to allow for investment in technologies that efficiently allocate natural resources to solve significant, societal problems.
[Updated on 7 June 2017]
KPI for Success
As AI technologies continue to develop, we require better methods for understanding how regulations and investments are shaping the general welfare. With proper measurement it is possible to understand how our interventions may (or may not) promote solutions to sustainable development goals. The principal concern is that AI systems are being integrated into key social institutions, even though their accuracy, and their social and economic effects, have not been rigorously studied or validated. In this session we explore questions at the intersection of AI, public policy, and economics to develop possible quantitative assessment of AI Roadmaps.
[Updated on 23 May 2017]
Approaches by Governments, Industries, and Other Stakeholders
Several governmental reports have recommended national approaches to questions surrounding artificial intelligence and its impact on society. Is there a global approach we could extract from these national efforts? What are the similarities and differences between these approaches? Can we identify a common path towards AI for Good?
Roadmap for Collaboration
Although we are yet to agree on the required mechanism, we are in clear need of an inclusive global dialogue to address the challenges and opportunities brought on by AI in policy, regulation, business, ethics and standardization. The agreement of a roadmap plotting a responsible development path for technology will demand the active involvement of government, industry, academia and civil society. How can we best utilize the expertise of AI researchers, corporations, and the general public to inform policy decisions around artificial intelligence? How can institutions adapt their missions to utilize the new opportunities of AI? What perspectives are currently missing from the discussion and how can we involve them? It is crucial that all stakeholders work together to identify a set of specific frameworks and strategies to create a roadmap to ensure that AI benefits all of humanity.
  

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