International Telecommunication Union   ITU
 
 
Site Map Contact us Print Version
 Thursday, August 01, 2013

What do you expect from ITU in the future and where should we be directing our efforts to best serve everyone? What do you see as future challenges? We want to hear your thoughts for our strategy and priorities in the coming years: http://www.itu.int/PublicConsultations

Thursday, August 01, 2013 2:54:24 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, July 16, 2013

G.fast, a new ITU broadband standard, that promises up to 1 Gbit/s over existing copper telephone wires, is one step closer following a meeting of ITU-T Study Group 15 this week. G.fast is designed to deliver superfast downloads up to a distance of 250 meters, thereby eliminating the expense of installing fibre between the distribution point and people’s homes.

The Geneva meeting saw first stage approval of ITU standard, Recommendation ITU-T G.9700, that specifies methods to minimize the risk of G.fast equipment interfering with broadcast services such as FM radio, paving the way for G.fast to be approved in early 2014.

G.fast is expected to be deployed by service providers wanting to provide fibre to the home (FTTH) like services, which will enable flexible upstream and downstream speeds to support bandwidth-intensive applications such as streaming Ultra-HDTV movies, uploading high-resolution video and photo libraries to cloud-based storage, and communicating via HD video.

Hamadoun Touré, Secretary-General, ITU: “Since the early days of the World Wide Web, people around the world have accessed the vast resource that has become the Internet via ITU standards. I applaud our membership for continuing to show great leadership in the development of these specifications that bring broadband into our homes at ever increasing speeds and at ever greater efficiencies.”

Full press release 

Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, July 16, 2013 8:50:06 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Stefano Galli, ITU-T’s lead expert on smart grid communications, is one of 2013’s recipients of the prestigious IEEE Donald G. Fink Award in recognition of his contribution to the field of power line communications (PLC) and the technology’s application in the development of smart grid.

Galli leads ITU-T’s smart-grid standardization work in his role as Rapporteur for Question 15: Communications for Smart Grid, a task team of ITU-T Study Group 15 (Networks, Technologies and Infrastructures for Transport, Access and Home). He is, in addition, a Co-convener of ITU-T’s Joint Coordination Activity on Smart Grid and Home Networking (JCA-SG&HN), the group coordinating smart-grid and home-networking standardization work across ITU and acting as the first point of contact for organizations interested in contributing to this work.

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) established the IEEE Donald G. Fink Award in 1979 to reward excellence in the authoring of surveys, reviews or tutorial papers published in the IEEE Transactions, Journals, Magazines, or in the Proceedings of the IEEE. The award is named in honour of Donald G. Fink: a distinguished editor and author, past President of the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE), and the first General Manager and Executive Director of IEEE.

Galli earned the award for his role played in authoring a paper titled, “For the Grid and Through the Grid: The Role of Power Line Communications in the Smart Grid”, published in the Proceedings of the IEEE (vol. 99, no. 6, pp. 998–1027). IEEE notes that the paper “is considered the most complete review of power line communications (PLC) technology published to date,” and that it “has quickly become a key reference document for the application of PLC technology in smart grids.” The paper offers a detailed breakdown of the role played by communications technologies in smart grid, familiarizing readers with the history of PLC methods and the latest advances in work to leverage PLC in the smart-grid functions for which the technology is best suited.

The paper was co-authored by Galli, an IEEE Fellow and Director of Technology Strategy with ASSIA, Inc. (Redwood City, CA, USA); Dr. Anna Scaglione, an IEEE Fellow and professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of California (Davis, CA, USA); and Dr. Zhifang Wang, an IEEE Member and assistant professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University (Richmond, VA, USA).

In December 2011 – representing the culmination of a standards effort in which Galli played an integral role – ITU members approved Recommendations ITU-T G.9955 and G.9956, a family of international narrowband powerline communications (NB-PLC) standards that will enable cost-effective smart grid applications such as distribution automation, diagnostic and fault location, smart metering, demand response, energy management, smart appliances, grid-to-home communications and advanced recharging systems for electric vehicles.

The next-generation NB-PLC transceivers defined in the ITU standards family are optimized for the various topologies and characteristics of power grids around the world, and the family’s support for Ethernet, IPv4 and IPv6 ensures that smart grid networks can easily be integrated with IP-based networks. The standards contain the physical layer (PHY) and the data link layer (DLL) specifications, respectively, for NB-PLC transceivers based on OFDM (orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing).

Read more on ITU’s family of NB-PLC standards in a press release issued upon its approval.

Subsequent to the standards' approval in 2011, September 2012 saw ITU-T Study Group 15 experts agreeing to the repackaging of Recommendations ITU-T G.9955 and G.9956 into four Recommendations (G.9901, G.9902, G.9903 and G.9904), a move designed to increase the clarity of this important family of standards and thereby stimulate industry adoption. Read the newslog article reporting this decision here.  

Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, July 02, 2013 3:46:45 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, June 27, 2013

ITU Headquarters in Geneva will in July host back-to-back meetings of ITU-T Study Group 15 and IEEE 802, two of the world’s foremost expert groups in the development of the international standards that give shape to global optical transport networks and the array of wireless, optical and copper-based access technologies through which end-users connect.

The meeting of ITU-T Study Group 15 (Networks, Technologies and Infrastructures for Transport, Access and Home), 1-12 July, will be followed by the 14-17 July Plenary Session of IEEE  802, the IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) expert group renowned for its influential stable of Ethernet and WiFi specifications. In parallel on 13 July, a free of charge, open to all workshop jointly organized by ITU/IEEE-SA will gather experts from ITU-T SG 15 and IEEE 802.1 (Higher Layer LAN Protocols Working Group) to present and discuss their work on Ethernet protection and packet synchronization. The event is a continuation of ITU-T Study Group 15 and the IEEE 802 LAN/MAN Standards Committee's effort to ensure the efficient coordination of their work.

ITU-T Study Group 15 develops international standards (ITU-T Recommendations) that define technologies and architectures of optical transport networks enabling long-haul global information exchange; fibre- or copper-based access networks through which subscribers connect; home networks connecting in-premises devices and interfacing with the outside world and smart grid technologies.

Meeting in July, the group will continue working towards the completion of key standards set for approval in 2013, including 40-Gigabit-capable passive optical networks (NG-PON2) and the full series of Recommendations in the ITU-T G.989 series describing the time and wavelength division multiplexed (TWDM) PON system.

Also planned for approval in 2013, under the working name ‘G.epon’, are standards on Ethernet PON using optical network terminal (ONT) management and control interface (OMCI), as well as standards under ‘G.multi’ to specify control aspects of multiple wavelength PONs. Study Group 15 also expects to reach first-stage approval (‘consent’) of ‘G.fast’ before the close of 2013. The new specification promises to enable fibre-optic data speeds up to of 1 Gbit/s over “last-mile” copper connections from fibre termination points to customers’ homes.

IEEE 802 LAN/MAN Standards Committee develops and maintains networking standards and recommended practices for a range of networks including local, metropolitan and other area networks; applying an open, internationally accredited standards process and advocating for the implementation of its standards on a global basis.

IEEE 802 standards having gained widespread adoption include those for Ethernet, Bridging and Virtual Bridged LANs, Wireless LAN, Wireless PAN, Wireless MAN, Wireless Coexistence, Media Independent Handover Services, and Wireless RAN.

The upcoming IEEE 802 Plenary Session in Geneva will see participation from the full range of IEEE 802’s Working Groups: 802.1 (Higher Layer LAN Protocols); 802.3 (Ethernet); 802.11 (Wireless LAN); 802.15 (Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN)); 802.16 (Broadband Wireless Access); 802.18 (Radio Regulatory TAG); 802.19 (Wireless Coexistence); 802.21 (Media Independent Handover Services); 802.22 (Wireless Regional Area Networks); 802.24 (Smart Grid TAG); and the  OmniRAN EC Study Group.

Read more on ITU standards for Transport, Access and Home on the ITU-T Study Group 15 at a Glance page.

Bookmark and Share


 

Thursday, June 27, 2013 1:45:25 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, March 28, 2013

An upcoming ITU workshop on ICT as an Enabler for Smart Water Management will be held in Luxor, Egypt on 14-15 April 2013.

Economic growth, seasonal climatic conditions and rising population are all affecting availability of water resources. Moreover, a number of effects linked to climate change, such as lengthy droughts and extreme weather events, are worsening the situation. Water shortages are at the core of many of the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), one of which is to reduce by half the number of people without safe access to water by 2015. According to the UN World Water Development Report, by 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of freshwater.

ICT provides a unique opportunity for water stakeholders to obtain information in near real-time about a number of physical and environmental variables such as temperature, soil moisture levels and rainfall through web enabled sensors and communication networks. Smart metering technologies can also provide individuals, businesses and water companies with information about their own water use, thus raising awareness about usage, locating leakages and having better control over water demand.

Organized by ITU at the kind invitation of the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology, Egypt this first ITU workshop to address this serious topic will address a number of issues including: weather forecasting; technological solutions and standards; smart metering; climate smart agriculture; water governance, institutions and regulations; stakeholder engagement; and planning water resources and land use.

It will result in a Call For Action for countries in the Nile River Basin area to implement best practices for smart water management in agriculture, consumption in cities, river flow forecasting to prevent calamities such as flooding and identification of leakages in the water distribution network.

More.

Bookmark and Share

Thursday, March 28, 2013 3:43:31 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Meeting at ITU headquarters in Geneva, 21-22 March 2013, the TSB Director’s Ad Hoc Group on IPR (IPR AHG) has continued making headway in its bid to ensure protection of the integrity of the standards-development process by clarifying aspects of ITU’s Patent Policy and related Guidelines– the Union’s main tool to manage the challenges associated with the incorporation of patents in standards (ITU-T Recommendations).

The licensing of standards-essential patents (SEPs) on reasonable and non-discriminatory (RAND) terms is a cornerstone of the standards-development process. The incorporation of SEPs on a RAND basis incentivizes the inclusion of cutting-edge patented technology in technical standards, while also ensuring that the holder of a SEP cannot abuse the dominant market position it gains from widespread adoption of a voluntary technical standard.

The IPR AHG has been active for over fiften years, providing a forum for experts to exchange views on IPR matters and offer advice on the best approach to the patent-standard relationship.

In recent months, certain stakeholders as well as competition authorities have raised concerns regarding the increase in standards-related patent litigation as well as the possible use of SEPs to exclude competitors from a market. American and European regulators have in addition expressed concerns with the possible use of SEPs to pressure standards implementers into accepting higher royalties in bi-lateral licensing negotiations – also referred to as patent hold-ups – an act which undermines the aims of RAND to the disadvantage of standards implementers, hurting the consumers ultimately shouldering these higher costs.

Against this backdrop, ITU held a high-profile Patent Roundtable in October 2012 which assembled all the key private-sector and regulatory players to unravel the source of SEP-related litigation and to plot the course to an appropriate remedy.

Acting on the conclusions of this Roundtable, the IPR AHG is currently undertaking an accelerated series of meetings, targeting two specific questions:

the conditions under which companies that have made RAND commitments should or should not be allowed to seek injunctions; and the clarification of the meaning of the word "reasonable" in the RAND context.

The next meeting of the IPR AHG will take place at ITU headquarters in Geneva, 25-26 April 2013.

A video message from the TSB Director to the IPR AHG can be viewed here.

Bookmark and Share

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 2:10:56 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, January 31, 2013


Attendees of the fourth meeting of ITU’s Focus Group on Disaster Relief, Network Resilience and Recovery (FG-DR&NRR) will participate in a one-day technical tour of Sendai city, the area hardest hit by 2011’s Great East Japan Earthquake, visiting affected telecommunication installations and R&D sites specialized in the study of network resilience and recovery.

Organized by ITU-T and hosted by Japan’s Ministry of Internal affairs and Communications (MIC) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), the fourth meeting of FG-DR&NRR will take place in Tokyo, Japan, 5-8 February 2013.

The meeting is preceded by an ITU workshop on “e-Health services in low-resource settings: Requirements and ITU role”, 4-5 February 2013, at the same venue. FG-DR&NRR participants are encouraged to attend this workshop, and particularly the afternoon sessions on the 5th where e-health applications related to disaster relief will be on show.

ITU-T Focus Groups are tasked with initiating work on new standardization challenges as input to the ITU-T Study Groups. Focus groups have a great deal of flexibility to decide their structure and working methods and participation is free of charge and open to non-members of ITU.

FG-DR&NRR was established in January 2012 at a meeting of the Telecommunication Standardization Advisory Group (TSAG). The group coordinates ITU-T’s current work in the disaster relief field, and is expanding this work into two important new areas: (1) disaster relief for individuals (to notify relatives, friends or employers of a victim’s situation) and (2) disaster relief guidance (to show victims the routes to evacuation shelters, home, etc.).

Read more on FG-DR&NRR and its upcoming meeting here

Bookmark and Share

Thursday, January 31, 2013 10:30:36 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, December 21, 2012
The 50 Resolutions and one Opinion approved by the World Telecommunication Standardization Assembly (WTSA12) are now online together with the modified ITU-T A-Series Recommendations that guide the work of ITU-T.
WTSA-12 which took place from 20 to 29 November 2012 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, defined the next study period for ITU-T.

Please note that the Editorial Committee will meet 9-10 January 2013 in Geneva for its final meeting, so there may still be editorial changes to the texts. WTSA-12 also appointed the leadership of the ten ITU-T study groups, the Telecommunication Standardization Advisory Group (TSAG), regional groups and the Standardization Committee for Vocabulary and the Review Committee (see http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/wtsa12/Pages/wtsa12-results-chairmen.aspx).

The Plenary reports are available here.

Bookmark and Share

Friday, December 21, 2012 4:07:13 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, October 22, 2012

A two-day tutorial in Gyeonggi, Korea, 30-31 October, will arm ICT experts in the region with the skills necessary to perform the roles of Rapporteur or Editor in the standardization work of ITU-T.
 
The event is sponsored by the Korean government and ITU-T and will be hosted by the Korea ITU Committee. The tutorial will be delivered by Gary Fishman, former Chair of the ITU-T Telecommunication Standardization Advisory Group (TSAG). Watch a video interview with him here.

Rapporteurs are responsible for coordinating standardization work undertaken within a particular “Question” of an ITU-T Study Group. A “Question” refers to a specific area of study and a Rapporteur will oversee work on multiple standards within that subject area, while at the same time liaising with other Questions and Study Groups to ensure that suites of complementary standards are produced in a coordinated manner. An Editor coordinates the construction of particular standard (ITU-T Recommendation); incorporating and consolidating contributions to a standard, and liaising with other Editors, Questions and Study Groups as appropriate.
 
The upcoming tutorial is part of ITU-T’s ongoing efforts to increase the efficiency and harmonization of the work performed by ITU-T Study Groups. The tutorialwill address, inter alia:

  • Leadership within working groups;
  • Role, authority and responsibility of Rapporteurs and Editors;
  • ITU basic texts as they relate to Rapporteurs and Editors;
  • Approval procedures for Recommendations, annexes, handbooks, etc.

Visit the event’s webpage here

Bookmark and Share

Monday, October 22, 2012 1:59:08 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 16, 2012

In a bid to find a globally agreed solution to concerns that patent hold-ups may reduce innovation and competition, ITU hosted a roundtable on 11 October.

Standards essential patents (SEPs) relate to technology essential for the implementation of a standard in which it is
incorporated, and require the patent holder to make a commitment to license the patent under RAND (Reasonable And Non-Discriminatory) terms.

The high-level roundtable was attended by representatives of Apple, Nokia, Ericsson, Microsoft, Samsung, Research in
Motion, Motorola Mobility and several other key industry players, as well as regulators, patent offices, government
representatives, and experts in intellectual property law. 

Many of the participants attended a meeting of the TSB Director’s Ad Hoc Group during the following two days. This meeting
agreed a roadmap to address the main concerns in particular: the conditions under which companies that have made RAND
commitments should be allowed to seek injunctions; and clarification of the meaning of the word "reasonable" in RAND.

The next meetings of the group will be 24-25 January 2013.

Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 7:52:43 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, September 28, 2012

ITU-T Study Group 15 – Transport and Access – has modified its standards on narrowband powerline communications (NB-PLC) following requests from administrations and utilities to accelerate deployments of Smart Grid. The group also advanced its “G.fast” project which promises to enable fibre-optic data speeds over “last-mile” copper connections from fibre termination points to customers’ homes.

Meeting at ITU headquarters in Geneva, 10-21 September, SG 15 hosted 370 delegates from 38 countries and received 439 contributions to its work on access network transport, optical technology and optical transport systems.

The meeting agreed the repackaging of Recommendations ITU-T G.9955 and G.9956, on NB-PLC, into four Recommendations, a move designed to increase the clarity of this important family of standards and thereby stimulate industry adoption. G.9955 and G.9956, detailed in an ITU press release here, will enable cost-effective smart grid applications such as distribution automation, diagnostic and fault location, smart metering, demand response, energy management, smart appliances, grid-to-home communications and advanced recharging systems for electric vehicles. Standardizing next-generation NB-PLC transceivers, the Recommendations are optimized for the various topologies and characteristics of power grids around the world, and will provide a 'smart' link between electricity and communications networks through their support of the use of power lines as a communications medium.

“G.fast for FTTdp (Fibre-to-the-Distribution Point)” is the working title of a project seeking to combine the high-bit rates of FTTH (Fibre-to-the-Home) and the customer self-installation ease of ADSL (Asynchronous Digital Subscriber Line). The G.fast project will offer a broadband access solution taking fibre to a distribution point very near a customer’s home, leaving a maximum of 250 metres of copper for the “last-mile” connection to a transceiver in a customer’s home. Many of the copper loop lengths are expected to be short enough to support aggregate bitrates exceeding 500 Mb/s on a single pair; enabling the provision of next-generation IPTV services as well as super-fast broadband access for small-to-medium sized enterprises (SMEs). SG 15’s September meeting addressed 37 contributions to the G.fast project which is on course to meeting its target of consent by July 2013 and approval as an ITU-T Recommendation by March 2014.

For more on the work of ITU-T Study Group 15, please see the group’s webpage here…

Bookmark and Share

Friday, September 28, 2012 2:21:02 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, September 18, 2012

In order to help overcome a short-term backlog of editorial work, ITU Telecommunication Standardization Bureau (TSB) is inviting applications to work remotely as a Technical Editing Assistant on a temporary consultancy basis.

Applicants should ideally have experience in editing ITU texts through previous involvement with ITU-T Study Groups. The work would involve editing the publications of ITU’s Standardization Sector (ITU-T) particularly ITU-T Recommendations; verifying technical consistency and validity, and taking measures to improve the quality in line with ITU-T guidelines and in consultation with relevant experts when appropriate. Remuneration is offered at 4000 CHF a month on the basis of a minimum 400 pages a month depending on the complexity of the text.
 
Applicants should have at least eight years of experience in technical or editorial work, including at least two years editing technical texts in English.
 
For more information or to apply, please contact tsbadmin@itu.int.

Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, September 18, 2012 8:11:27 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Briefing sessions for ITU members on proposals submitted to WCIT-12 and WTSA-12 will be held at ITU Headquarters in Geneva, on 8 and 9 October 2012. The sessions will be chaired by Mohamed Al-Ghanim, Director General of the Telecommunications Regulatory Authority, United Arab Emirates. The WCIT-12 session will take place the full day on Tuesday 8 October and the morning of 9 October and the WTSA-12 session will follow that afternoon.

These meetings will provide participants with the opportunity to explain their proposals, exchange views and have a better understanding of each other’s proposals and positions. The Secretariat will provide two documents, one for WCIT and one for WTSA, showing the consolidated proposals submitted by 1 October 2012.

For further information please refer to Circular 1025

Bookmark and Share

Wednesday, September 12, 2012 2:07:38 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, September 07, 2012

ITU is inviting applications for the post of Study Group Advisor, Telecommunication Standardization Bureau (TSB), at ITU headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.

The successful candidate will provide secretariat support to an ITU-T Study Group; assisting the management team and working groups by, inter alia, studying all contributions and consulting with the submitting bodies,preparing draft texts (recommendations, reports, questions, etc.) and providing input on the technical accuracy and comprehensiveness of all such texts.

Applicants should have at least seven years of experience in the field of ICTs/telecommunications, including at least three at the international level. A Doctorate in a related field can be considered as a substitute for three years of working experience.

Expertise on service definition, numbering, naming, addressing requirements and resource assignment including criteria and procedures for reservation and assignment would be an advantage. In addition knowledge of tariff and accounting matters (including costing methodologies) for international telecommunication services and related telecommunication economic, accounting and policy issues would be an advantage.

Standards from the ITU are at the heart of modern information and communications technologies (ICTs). For more information see: http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/info.

The Telecommunication Standardization Bureau (TSB) provides essential logistical support to ITU-T’s 10 Study Groups including electronic working facilities and meeting management. It also manages promotion, workshops, membership, documents, finance, the website etc. It is the body responsible for providing cohesion to ITU-T’s standards making process.

An attractive package of salary (132,499 -171,699 USD without dependents;
142,285-185,624 USD with dependents [Net of Tax]) plus international allowances and benefits is offered (subject to eligibility).

The closing date for applications is 5 November 2012.

A detailed vacancy notice and application form, including remuneration, can be downloaded here. Applications using the form must be sent to recruitment@itu.int or by post to ITU Human Resources Administration Division, Place des Nations, CH-1211, Geneva 20, Switzerland. Applications must reach ITU by the closing date.

Bookmark and Share

Friday, September 07, 2012 11:58:34 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, September 06, 2012

The high-level segment of ITU’s second Green Standards Week will take place on 19 September and will feature a host of ICT key players and ministers.

Among those speaking are Jean-Philippe Courtois, President, Microsoft International; H.E. Mr. Tryphon Kin-Kiey Mulumba, Ministre des Postes, Télécommunications et Nouvelles Technologies de l'Information et de la Communication, République Démocratique du Congo and H.E. Mr. Haruna Iddrisu, Minister of Communications, Ghana. The full list can be found here.

The High-Level Segment (HLS) will provide ministers and senior representatives from the ICT industry with an opportunity to exchange views on the role of global standards in spreading access to green ICT, as well the development of new standards that reflect the interdependence of industry sectors.

Green Standards Week (GSW) will take place from 17 to 21 September in Paris France. GSW is a cluster of workshops, hosted by Microsoft and supported by Huawei, Orange, Fujitsu and Telefonica, which will focus on raising awareness of the importance of using ICT standards to build a green economy and combat climate change. Remote participation will be made possible with video, streamed audio and the ability to send questions via a moderator (instructions will be provided to those who opt for remote participation on the online registration form).

GSW will bring together leading specialists in the field, from top policy-makers to engineers, designers, planners, government officials, regulators, standards experts and others. It is open to participation by the press, and journalists wishing to attend should email Toby Johnson at toby.johnson@itu.int.


Bookmark and Share

Thursday, September 06, 2012 1:33:29 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, August 01, 2012

A new group has been established to investigate academia’s approach to ICT standardization, with a view to increasing the weight assigned to the subject in academic curricula. It will also aim to identify ITU-T action to aid its academic membership in this endeavour. Comments are welcome on the Draft Terms of Reference for the TSB Director's Ad Hoc Group on Standards Education, available here. Proposed revisions should be sent to tsbtsag@itu.int by Wednesday 15 August.

The Ad Hoc Group will include representatives of ITU-T, academia and other standards development organizations (SDOs) interested in collaborating to advance standards education worldwide. Participation is open to all interested parties, including non-members of ITU, free of charge.

In this context, “standards education” relates not to technology-focused topics, but rather to education on the importance of standards to the ICT sector, and by extension, to the operation of businesses and economies at large. ICT today underpins almost all commercial activity and it is essential that we familiarize students with ICT standards development processes, standard strategy planning, and business case studies demonstrating the importance of international standards to industry.

A tentative work plan for the group includes; performing a “gap analysis” regarding ICT standardization courses currently offered by universities; gathering information on standards education programs from relevant external groups; developing course or curricula “templates” to be used by academia in constructing standards-education offerings; and identifying strategies to facilitate the adoption of credit-eligible courses in undergraduate and graduate programmes.

The group’s first meeting will take place during the Joint ITU-GISFI-DS-CTIF Standards Education Workshop, 8-9 October 2012, Aalborg University, Denmark.

For more information, please see the Ad Hoc Group’s webpage here.

Bookmark and Share

Wednesday, August 01, 2012 8:27:47 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, June 11, 2012

ITU is organizing a roundtable on the effectiveness of RAND-based (reasonable and non-discriminatory) patent policies, 10 October 2012.

The ITU Patent Roundtable is being held in light of the recent worldwide increase in patent litigation, and possible lack of adherence to standards bodies’ existing IPR (Intellectual Property Rights) policies.

The event, which will be run using a World Café methodology, will provide a neutral venue for industry, standards bodies and regulators to exchange ideas that will guide future discussions on whether current patent policies and existing industry practices adequately respond to the needs of the various stakeholders. It will bring together standards bodies, industry players and government representatives from around the world aiming to find solutions to the key issues today affecting the ICT industry’s engagement with patents and standards.
 
More here.

Bookmark and Share

Monday, June 11, 2012 8:14:03 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, May 10, 2012
ITU is inviting applications for the post of Study Group Engineer, Telecommunication Standardization Bureau (TSB), at ITU headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.
The successful candidate should have at least five years of experience in the field of telecommunication technologies and services, including at least two at the international level.  Expertise on service definition, numbering, naming, addressing requirements and resource assignment including criteria and procedures for reservation and assignment would be an advantage. In addition knowledge of tariff and accounting matters (including costing methodologies) for international telecommunication services and study of related telecommunication economic, accounting and policy issues would be an advantage.

Standards from the ITU are at the heart of modern information and communications technologies (ICTs). For more information see: http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/info.
 
The Telecommunication Standardization Bureau (TSB) provides essential logistical support to ITU-T’s 10 Study Groups including electronic working facilities and meeting management. It also manages promotion, workshops, membership, documents, finance, the website etc. It is the body responsible for providing cohesion to ITU-T’s standards making process.
 
An attractive package of salary (approximately 115,509.- USD - 154,159.- USD without dependants or 123,747.- USD - 165,818.- USD with dependants  [Net of Tax]) plus international allowances and benefits is offered (subject to eligibility).
 
The closing date for applications is 9 July 2012.
 
A detailed vacancy notice and application form including remuneration can be downloaded here. Applications using the form must be sent to recruitment@itu.int or by post to ITU Human Resources Administration Division, Place des Nations, CH-1211, Geneva 20, Switzerland. Applications must reach ITU by the closing date.

Bookmark and Share

Thursday, May 10, 2012 3:25:04 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, March 16, 2012

Following the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between ITU and the four standardisation bodies of China, Japan and Korea (CJK) last year, see press release here Malcolm Johnson, Director of the ITU’s Telecommunication Standardization Bureau, led a delegation from the ITU Secretariat to the eleventh CJK Meeting (CJK-11) 14-16 March at the Seagaia Convention Centre in Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan. The Indian standards body GISFI also attended the meeting as an observer as it has requested to join the MoU.

The meeting addressed global ICT standardization questions of common interest to the region’s key standards bodies: ARIB, CCSA, TTA and TTC.

In his opening speech Johnson noted that CJK governments together account for 15 per cent of the total financial contributions received by ITU from Member States, and private entities from these nations account for 20 per cent of the contributions ITU-T receives from the private sector. Moreover, CJK makes a significant number contribution to ITU meetings: 38 percent more contributions in 2011 than in 2009.

Full speech can be seen here.

CJK meetings seek to maintain and improve the commitment to mutual understanding and cooperation, and recognise the imperative of coordinated international standards for the sound progression of each of the countries’ ICT industries.  The meeting identified the following topics as candidates for collaboration under the MoU: M2M and Dynamic Spectrum Access; Future IMT; smart grid; cloud computing and security; and the work on environment and climate change.

The Deputy Director of ITU’s Radiocommunication Bureau, Fabio Leite, also participated in the meeting stressing the importance of collaboration with ITU’s Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R), in particular on M2M access networks where there is a clear need for interoperability between radio-based systems.

Bookmark and Share

Friday, March 16, 2012 9:00:07 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, February 03, 2012

The January meeting of the Telecommunication Standardization Advisory Group (TSAG) has established a new Focus Group on Disaster Relief Systems, Network Resilience and Recovery (FG-DR&NRR).

A spate of recent natural disasters has underlined the need for preemptive disaster-response planning. ICT networks must be resilient enough to withstand disasters, but have also proven to be pivotal in providing relief to the people affected by major climatic fluctuations.

The Focus Group will coordinate ITU-T’s current work in this field, and will expand this work into two important new areas: (1) disaster relief for individuals (to notify relatives, friends or employers of a victim’s situation) and (2) disaster relief guidance (to show victims the routes to evacuation shelters, home, etc.).

 For these types of standardized emergency communications to exist, ICT network resilience and recovery capabilities need to be such that networks can resume normal service quickly after disaster strikes. TSAG has thus directed the Focus Group to identify all the standardization requirements of network resilience and recovery; a study which may extend beyond current ITU work in this field.

The Focus Group’s scope is as follows:

  • identify requirements for disaster relief and network resilience and familiarize the ITU-T and standardization communities with those requirements;
  • identify existing standards and existing work related to the requirements mentioned above;
  • identify any additional standards that may need to be developed and identify future work items for specific ITU-T Study groups and related actions;
  • encourage collaboration among ITU-T Study Groups, in particular SG2, SG5, SG13, SG15, and SG17, ITU-R, ITU-D and relevant organizations and communities, including the PCP/TDR.

The Focus Group will collaborate with worldwide relevant communities (e.g., research institutes, forums, academia) including other SDOs and consortia.

Comments invited by 10 February 2012

The group’s Terms of Reference are subject to consultation. The Membership is therefore invited to send comments to bruce.gracie@ic.gc.ca (TSAG Chairman), with copy to tsbtsag@itu.int or to t09tsagall@lists.itu.int (TSAG general mailing list), by no later than Friday, 10 February 2012.

Bookmark and Share


 

Friday, February 03, 2012 9:03:18 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, December 22, 2011

Geneva, 21 December - Key standards (ITU-T Recommendations) on smart grid have been approved at a recent ITU SG 15 meeting.

Recommendations ITU-T G.9955 and G.9956 define three international next generation narrowband powerline communications (NB-PLC) standards. The approved family of standards will enable cost-effective smart grid applications such as distribution automation, diagnostic and fault location, smart metering, demand response, energy management, smart appliances, grid-to-home communications and advanced recharging systems for electric vehicles.

The standards are an ideal platform for smart grid applications because of their use of power lines as a communications medium which is under the direct and complete control of power utilities.

Full press release

Bookmark and Share

Thursday, December 22, 2011 11:27:20 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Saturday, December 17, 2011

Key standards (ITU-T Recommendations) on a technology (MPLS-TP) required by telecoms operators to increase network efficiency while also reducing capex and opex costs have been approved (or attained first level approval) at a recent ITU meeting.

MPLS-TP refers to extensions to the IETF's MPLS protocol developed in cooperation with the IETF. MPLS can carry packets of different types, allowing telecom operators to offer private connections as well as IP services. Many network operators expect MPLS-TP to work under the same principles as longstanding ITU transport network technologies like SDH and OTN. MPLS-TP provides network operators with a reliable packet-based technology the operation of which aligns with current organizational processes and large-scale work procedures. Its deployment may reduce the need for layer 3 routing in an operator’s network.

Another important draft standard in the field has been forwarded to ITU’s quadrennial World Telecommunication Standardization Assembly (WTSA-12) in Dubai next year. This provides an Ethernet based protocol for operations, administration and management (OAM) for Transport MPLS (MPLS-TP). The delay in approval follows the breakdown of a deal brokered by the Japanese administration in November. The compromise proposed was intended to address concerns expressed by IETF, following a series of previous setbacks, detailed here and here. Unfortunately the IETF were unable to deliver one key element of the proposal, the ACh codepoint which contributed to four national delegations vetoing the standard.

Malcolm Johnson, Director, Telecommunication Standardization Bureau, ITU: “I would like to thank Japan for its great effort as a neutral party to find a compromise that took into account IETF’s concerns. It is clear that the majority of the world’s ICT industry and governments supports this standard. It is a practical solution demanded by operators around the globe. I am hopeful that IETF will be able to assign the ACh codepoint before WTSA-12 which should allow the standard to be approved by consensus. ITU has a tradition of working by consensus but this is dependent on delegations being willing to compromise.”

At the close of its December meeting Study Group 15 repeated its request to the IETF to provide an ACh codepoint for the Ethernet based OAM protocols. This request is in line with ITU’s continued commitment to a collegial working environment for ICT standards development.

Bookmark and Share

Saturday, December 17, 2011 6:56:52 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, December 14, 2011
 Tuesday, November 29, 2011

The result of the consultation of Member States in TSB Circulars 203 and 231 is as follows:

Rec. No.

Yes

No

G.9980

31

1

G.8113.1

33

5

G.9955

33

0

G.9964

24

0

Accordingly these draft Recommendations will now be included in the list to be considered for approval at the SG15 closing plenary on 16 December 2011. 

Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, November 29, 2011 2:04:55 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, November 21, 2011
Meeting of Study Group 15, Geneva Switzerland, 5 - 16 December 2011

Registration form

Collective Letter 8

Bookmark and Share

Monday, November 21, 2011 10:51:03 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, November 14, 2011

Ahead of IETF’s 82nd meeting Malcolm Johnson, Director of ITU’s Telecommunication Standardization Bureau (TSB) has issued a statement underlining ITU’s commitment to a collegial working environment for ICT standards.
 
"Wherever appropriate, ITU will continue to reference the deliverables of other standards bodies rather than duplicating their work, and as far as possible we try to avoid the development of competing standards. By doing so we can best serve the needs of the international ICT community."
 
The statement underlines ITU core principles on cooperation detailed in ITU-T’s strategic plan (contained in Resolution 71 (Rev. Guadalajara 2010)) : “Cooperation and collaboration with other standardization bodies and relevant consortia and fora are key to avoiding duplication of work and achieving efficient use of resources, as well as incorporating expertise from outside ITU.”
 
Full details on generic procedures for including references to documents of other organizations in ITU-T Recommendations can be found in ITU-T Recommendation A.5.
 
Consequently Mr Johnson and Mr Russ Housley, Chair of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) have agreed that MPLS, including MPLS-TP, is defined exclusively in the standards-track RFCs. The ITU-T will reference the IETF RFCs for MPLS-TP from its Recommendations providing there is consensus that they meet the needs of its members. By mutual agreement some other specific aspects, including the equipment model and protocol-neutral management information model (G.8121-series, G.8151, G.8152), developed in ITU-T are considered part of MPLS-TP.
 

Bookmark and Share

Monday, November 14, 2011 9:24:09 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, September 16, 2011

A new Standards Q&A Forum will promote more interactive discussion between the experts creating ICT standards and those applying them. The pilot project has been launched to enable the submission of queries on all aspects of ITU-T Recommendations, in particular from developing countries.
 
Alongside the transfer of knowledge to developing nations, industry members in the developed world gain an opportunity to tap into new markets; making their products and services known to rapidly growing markets in developing nations.
 
The open, moderated forum will focus on the standardization work of ITU and offers participants a unique opportunity to engage with the experts that develop the standards underpinning ICT. An FAQ section introduces strangers to standardization and the ITU-T, covering all manner of questions from, “Why do we need international standards?,” to, “How does the ITU-T decide what needs standardization?” The forum is then organized into the major themes or questions being dealt with by ITU-T study groups.
 

Bookmark and Share


 

Friday, September 16, 2011 9:06:29 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, September 12, 2011

The first ITU Green Standards Week closed Friday with a call on international bodies, NGOs, standards bodies, governments, regulators, industry and academia to collaborate more closely on the application and development of information and communication technologies (ICT) standards to help combat climate change. Particular emphasis was placed on a globalized methodology to assess the environmental impact of ICTs, reducing e-waste, and the use of submarine cables for climate monitoring and disaster warning.

ITU has been working with industry and government members aiming to achieve agreement on an internationally recognized set of methodologies to be approved by the end of the year. Included is a methodology which ICT companies can use to measure their own carbon footprint, as well as a way to estimate the considerable savings in global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy that can be achieved in other sectors through the use of ICTs.

Full press release

Bookmark and Share

Monday, September 12, 2011 10:27:36 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, August 30, 2011

ITU-T is to host two webinars in September – kick starting a new programme of standalone virtual events that will augment the traditional workshops programme.

The first event on 15 September will focus on Optical fibres, cables and systems and is based on the ITU-T handbook of the same name. The webinar will provide a basic overview of the handbook which offers a functional grouping of ITU standards (ITU-T Recommendations) on optical technology e.g. optical fibres and cables, physical optical interfaces, optical fibres terrestrial and submarine cable systems.

Speakers are leading experts in the field from industry and either participated in the writing of the handbook or contributed to the development of the referenced standards. The event is aimed at engineers, technicians, technologists, mid-level management and regulators active in the implementation of optical-fibres-based systems. The online event complements the 2nd ITU Tutorial on Optical Fibres Cables and Systems which will take place at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, Mexico from 19 to 30 September 2011.

Find out more here: http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/worksem/optical-fibre/201109/webinar.html

The second event on 20 September focuses on ITU-T standards for optical transport networks (OTN) which have played a leading role in transforming the Internet’s bandwidth capabilities. This work is led by ITU-T Study Group 15, which has developed a set of standards (ITU-T Recommendations) that define the existing OTN framework. SG 15 is currently developing future technologies such as gigabit-capable and 10-gigabit-capable passive optical networks (GPON and XGPON) to satisfy the unprecedented bandwidth requirements that will soon be demanded by service providers and consumers. This online event is based on the ITU-T manual on Optical Transport Networks from TDM to Packet.

Find out more here: http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/worksem/otn/201109/index.html

Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 4:36:54 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, July 22, 2011

The 2nd ITU Tutorial on Optical Fibre Cables and Systems will take place at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, Mexico from 19 to 30 September 2011.
 
The tutorial is based on the ITU-T handbook “Optical fibres, cables and systems” which offers a functional grouping of ITU standards (ITU-T Recommendations) on optical technology e.g. optical fibres and cables, physical optical interfaces, optical fibre terrestrial and submarine cable systems. The tutors are leading experts in the field from industry and either participated in the writing of the handbook or contributed to the development of the referenced standards. The event is aimed at engineers, technicians, technologists, mid-level management and regulators active in the implementation of optical-fibre-based systems.

The programme will provide an in-depth insight into the ITU-T Recommendations that have shaped the optical transport networks of the world. Some aspects of wireless communication will also be addressed in cooperation with the Development Sector of the ITU (ITU-D). Participants will gain a insight into how to design and implement projects choosing the most appropriate state-of-the-art equipment. In addition they will learn how to evaluate a power budget and the fundamental parameters to be taken into account in the preparation of technical and administrative specifications for a supply contract.

On Saturday, 24th September, a “crash” course on Optical fibres, cables and systems will also be held at the same venue.  The target audience will be university students and/or specialized schools from Mexico and other Latin American countries. It is intended to provide participants a general overview of optical fibre standardization. In addition a supporting webinar will take place in the week starting 12 September – details to follow.

Bookmark and Share

Friday, July 22, 2011 8:41:36 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, July 20, 2011

ITU is organizing the first Green Standards Week from 5 to 9 September in Rome, Italy. The cluster of workshops, hosted by Telecom Italia and supported by Huawei, RIM, Alcatel Lucent and Microsoft, will focus on raising awareness of the importance of using ICT standards to build a green economy and combat climate change. Full remote participation will be made possible with video, streamed audio and the ability to send questions via a moderator.

A High-Level Segment (HLS) will provide Ministers and senior representatives from the ICT industry with an opportunity to exchange views on how ICTs can help in the implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in the run-up to Durban (COP-17) and in preparation for the Earth Summit Rio +20 to be held in 2012. The HLS will aim to set transparent policy objectives and targets to measure and improve government green ICT strategies and standards, including ICT-enabled applications across the economy.

During the event the winner of the Green ICT Applications Challenge will be announced and be given the opportunity to present their concept for an app to combat climate change.

The first workshop will focus on methodologies for environmental impact assessment of ICT and will examine work underway to measure the impact of ICTs on climate change and how to standardize the way to calculate the reduction of GHG that ICTs have. This workshop will be jointly organized with the European Commission.

A second workshop will look at moving to a green economy through ICT standards will explore how ICTs can help to address climate change and build a green economy, shedding light on standards, policies and best practices. This workshop will be jointly organized with Telecom Italia.

The last day will see a workshop on using submarine communications networks to monitor the climate and will aim to encourage the development of new technologies and standards and will explore business opportunities for telecommunication companies to become active players in monitoring climate change. This workshop will be jointly organized by ITU, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Green Standards Week will bring together leading specialists in the field, from top policy-makers to engineers, designers, planners,
government officials, regulators, standards experts and others. It is open to participation by the press.

Bookmark and Share


 

Wednesday, July 20, 2011 9:18:32 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, June 20, 2011
A new ITU-T Technology Watch Report provides an overview of emerging trends in optical networking and progression towards the all optical computer. The report also surveys current and forthcoming standardization work in the field of optical technologies.

Today, the most widely used optical technology is optical fibre for high-speed interconnections, such as in server racks, connecting offices, buildings, metropolitan networks, in computers for data transfer and even continents via submarine cables. However, none of these devices is fully optical; all rely to some extent on conventional electronic circuits and components.

In the past, high costs have prevented optical components from finding their way into computers. But as optical technology matures, prices drop and the limits of miniaturization appear to have been reached, optical alternatives are finding their place in computer systems. The use of all types of optical technologies in communication networks and computers, because they consume less power, is seen as a major saving on operational costs for service providers, while at the same time helping to reduce the carbon footprint. The gradual incorporation of optical technology into the world of traditional electronics is paving the way for the era of the optical world.

Without optical technologies and optical networking related standards, the Internet as we know it today would not be feasible. Optical technologies have been the driving force behind the bandwidth growth of the Internet and enabled the emergence of bandwidth hungry applications for video and new business models such as YouTube which allows users to share video clips. According to the annual Cisco Visual Networking Index, the estimated global Internet Protocol (IP) traffic was 176 exabytes (x1018) in 2009 and  is projected to increase more than fourfold to reach 767 exabytes by 2014. This growth will be driven mainly by video, due to improvements in bandwidth capacity and the increasing popularity of high-definition and 3D television.

ITU-T standards in optical transport networks (OTN)  have played a leading role in transforming the Internet’s bandwidth capabilities. This work is led by ITU-T Study Group 15, which has developed a set of Recommendations that defines the existing OTN framework, and is currently developing future technologies such as gigabit-capable and 10-gigabit-capable passive optical networks (GPON and XGPON) to satisfy the unprecedented bandwidth requirements that will soon be demanded by service providers and consumers.

Major breakthroughs are expected in the areas of optical networking, silicon photonics, nanotechnologies and non-linear optics which could lead to major changes in the way computers, networks and data centres are designed.

A dedicated website provides additional sources of information and an overview of ITU-T Study Groups with work items related to optical technologies.

Download Report                   Go to Optical World Website

Bookmark and Share

Monday, June 20, 2011 8:44:19 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, June 07, 2011
Four ITU-T G.hn chipset manufacturers converged on Geneva this week to test interoperability between their products. The advanced interoperability demonstrated highlights the maturity of the various vendors' designs and the completeness of the G.hn standard. Experts expect products on the market before the end of the year.
 
Hosted by ITU, the event was a joint effort of HomeGrid Forum and the Broadband Forum, and the first major opportunity for silicon vendors to test the interoperability of their products for the G.hn home networking standard. The event was facilitated by the University of New Hampshire Interoperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL).
 
ITU-T G.hn is the first global home networking standard, created to unify home networking services and devices over any wire, including coaxial cable, phone lines or power lines. Lantiq, Marvell, Metanoia, and Sigma Designs participated in the week-long event that covered interoperation in the physical layer.
 
In parallel, experts met at a workshop designed to ensure that the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) concerns are taken into account in the rollout of the new technology.
 
“Interoperability is key to the success of any new technology,” said Malcolm Johnson, Director of the Telecommunication Standardization Bureau. “These events give vendors a unique opportunity to prove to service providers that their products are ready for market. And products conforming to the G.hn specification comply with the most rigorous EMC requirements that ensure they cause no interference to radio services.”

HomeGrid is poised to launch a formal Compliance and Interoperability program, bringing HomeGrid certified products to the market this year and giving the industry a new benchmark of technology excellence for wired home networking. Another interoperability event is planned later in the year.

Bookmark and Share


Tuesday, June 07, 2011 8:13:38 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, June 03, 2011
Geneva, 02 June, 2011 – Concerns that home networking products using power line transmission (PLT) technology may cause interference with radio services led to a Forum last week in Geneva to address the issue. ITU’s own home networking standard ITU-T G.hn was considered to have electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)  and mitigation techniques that go well beyond those considered essential for protecting radio services.

Given the variety of electronic devices in our homes, strict EMC requirements are imperative. Over-the-air broadcast services in particular could be subject to interference from PLT systems.

Full press release

Bookmark and Share

Friday, June 03, 2011 9:56:35 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, May 17, 2011
ITU will host an event to test the interoperability of products incorporating its ITU-T G.hn home networking standard, 23-27 May.

Facilitated by the University of New Hampshire Interoperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL), an independent provider of broad-based testing and standards conformance services for the networking industry, the event is a joint effort by the HomeGrid Forum and the Broadband Forum.

Members of the Broadband Forum and HomeGrid Forum will be able to submit their chipsets for interoperability testing with other chipsets. Results will further strengthen the test suite and will serve as the proving ground for future events and certification efforts. The intent is to provide a structured approach to multi-vendor interoperability testing.
 
ITU-T G.hn is the first global home networking standard, created to unify home networking services and devices over any wire, including coaxial cable, phone lines or power lines. The event is driven by vendor interest and the industry’s desire to test early silicon and demonstrate G.hn technology’s market potential. Multiple G.hn chipset vendors are expected to participate.
 
Specifically, the goals of this first G.hn Interop event are to launch the organizations’ formal test program, validate what is being defined in the test suite, and perform early tests for interoperability and compliance of chipsets from a number of vendors. Performance results will be recorded providing valuable feedback to the participating players prior to market entry. This allows for efficient editing to the test plans and helps ensure that products hitting the market are interoperable.

HomeGrid Forum will also hold additional events, in addition to its Compliance & Interoperability Program public interoperability events, compliance/conformance testing, and will eventually issue certification.

Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, May 17, 2011 9:18:45 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, April 18, 2011
Monday, April 18, 2011 1:31:16 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, April 07, 2011
ITU expert Huub Van Helvoort will speak at the Light Reading Ethernet Europe event in London next week. Van Helvoort will take part in a panel discussion: “Extending Connection-Oriented Ethernet End-to-End Using MPLS-TP”.
 
The session will focus on how operators can enhance their metro Ethernet networks and optimize them for transport by deploying an end-to-end Carrier Ethernet network that incorporates the emerging Transport Profile of MPLS (MPLS-TP) which provides interworking with IP/MPLS and packet-optical technologies. ITU recently agreed first stage approval of a key standard in the field here.
 
MPLS-TP promises to change the economic equation and enable more affordable end-to-end MPLS deployments by helping streamline operational models and consolidate/simplify network topologies.
The session will be moderated by Stan Hubbard, Senior Analyst, Heavy Reading.

Bookmark 

and Share
 

Thursday, April 07, 2011 8:27:47 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, March 24, 2011
Meeting of  Study Group 15,  Geneva, Switzerland, 28 March - 1 April 2011

Registration form

Study Group 15

Bookmark 

and Share

Thursday, March 24, 2011 10:46:36 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, March 14, 2011
ITU-T IPTV-GSI event, Geneva, 14 - 18 March 2011

TSB Circular 160

Registration form

Bookmark 

and Share

Monday, March 14, 2011 11:20:26 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
With ITU’s recent announcement on an OAM standard for MPLS in transport networks generating claims from the Internet Society that it will jeopardize the Internet, counter claims and much press coverage it seems the right time to set the record straight.

The technology at the heart of the debate is operations and management (OAM) for Transport MPLS. MPLS-TP refers to an adaptation of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)'s MPLS protocol for telecom networks. MPLS can carry packets of different types, allowing telecom operators to offer private connections as well as IP services.

ITU-T Study Group 15 working on MPLS-TP voted 25, February 2011, to proceed with its own OAM solution, rather than only working with the IETF on the development its preferred OAM solution. This step was taken since, despite the agreement between the two organizations to work together, the OAM solution being developed by the IETF does not satisfy the requirements of some members of the ITU.

The text below charts a history of the work T-MPLS/MPLS-TP work in ITU to address a management protocol for telecom-operator networks and seeks to explain the divergence.

History of MPLS-TP

In 2006/2007 the ITU-T developed Recommendations on T-MPLS, a sub-set of MPLS that was targeted specifically for application in the transport network (to offer a more flexible interconnection between routers than SDH or OTN). By January 2008 the ITU-T had 5 approved Recommendation on T-MPLS and one on OAM ready for approval. However, in late 2007 the IETF indicated that T-MPLS may be in conflict with IP/MPLS. The ITU suspended work on T-MPLS and in 2008 agreed to work in cooperation with the IETF on the evolution of MPLS to meet the needs of the transport network. It was anticipated that the five existing Recommendations on MPLS-TP would be replaced by mid 2009 with a Recommendation on OAM following within a year. The IETF RFCs that are necessary to allow replacement of this initial set of Recommendations are not yet available.

One particularly contentious issue has been OAM. A significant segment of the operator community views that the IETF has given insufficient consideration to their needs, concerns, and proposals (documented in Internet drafts). The IETF state that the protocols currently under development will meet the requirements. After over a year of discussion, there has been no quantitative analysis to demonstrate that they satisfy the operational behaviour and procedures utilized in transport networks of these network operators.

One important initial step in the joint work was for the IETF and ITU-T agree on a mechanism to detect OAM packets that conforms to the MPLS architecture. The agreed mechanism uses a new reserved label (13) and a “Protocol Identifier” know as the G-ACh code point to identify specific functions and protocols. More than 64,000 of these code points are available.

The ITU proposed that the OAM for MPLS-TP should be based on Y.1731 (carrier grade Ethernet) which had already been proven to meet the requirements of the transport network. Instead in July 2009 the IETF insisted that the OAM should be based on existing IETF tools to support backwards compatibility. This included developing extensions to an existing tool, Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) for continuity check and connectivity verification (CC/CV).

In October 2009 the IETF disbanded the MPLS interop design team (the MEAD team) claiming that its work had been completed. The MEAD team was established in response to one of the proposals in the JWT report. See below for the relevant text from the JWT report.

Another proposal in the JWT report is that experts from the ITU should directly participate in the work of the IETF. However, since this group of experts are viewed as “newcomers” when considering rough consensus the opinions of these experts are given less weight than the opinions of “long term” IETF participants. This is allowed by the IETF guidelines when judging what it calls “rough consensus”. However, it does not meet the intent of the collaboration between the ITU and the IETF. Since the MEAD team was disbanded the IETF has continued to take decisions on the direction of the work without consulting the ITU, without informing the ITU of these decisions, or requesting confirmation from ITU that the resultant solutions produced by the IETF will meet the needs of all of the membership of the ITU. Several RFCs on MPLS-TP have been approved without receiving consensus support from the ITU.

In May 2010 the MPLS working group adopted the BFD based draft by rough consensus. The WG chair suspended the poll for making this a WG draft since “we are not reaching consensus” (see http://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/mpls/current/msg04502.html), a few days later he decided to adopt the document as a WG draft anyway (see http://www.ietf.org/mail-archive/web/mpls/current/msg04512.html). In an attempt to meet some of the requirements of the transport network the BFD draft has evolved. It is no longer backwards compatible with the existing BFD based tools or with any of the existing PW OAM tools. It uses a complex state machine to negotiate the repetition rate of the messages. This state machine is only required to allow routers (that have been optimized for other applications) to negotiate a lower repetition rate for OAM messages since they are unable to sustain the rates required for transport network applications. One of the key requirements of the transport network is that the repetition rate must be set by the network operator and remain fixed at this value. Adding a state machine to negotiate the rate significantly increases the complexity and impacts the scalability of the network. For applications in the transport network, a solution that does not use rate negotiation is technically superior and less complex (and therefore offers a lower cost solution).

The IETF have continually refused to consider the Y.1731 based solution (in draft-bhh-mpls-tp-oam-y1731 and G.tpoam) despite the extensive deployment experience, successful multi vendor interoperability tests and strong support from multiple network operators.

The current approach is dissipating significant resources from both standards organizations without producing tangible results. It is unlikely that these views will be reconciled by further discussion (as shown by the discussions in SG15 meeting in February 2011).

In an attempt to break this deadlock, in July 2010 at the request of several Member States, the ITU-T proposed an enhancement to the model for the interaction with the IETF on OAM. This proposal was based on the model that was used with great success when the IEEE and ITU collaborated on the development of OAM for carrier grade Ethernet. This approach allows both organizations to develop solutions that meet the needs of their constituents within a common architecture and would significantly reduce the amount of time spent by both standards bodies. However, so far the IETF have chosen not to explore this approach.

Due to this lack of progress, and to meet the needs of its members, ITU-T decided to move ahead and document an OAM solution that can co-exist, both in the network and in the Recommendations, with an IETF defined solution. The solution being proposed by the ITU conforms to the MPLS-TP architecture as defined by the IETF. It uses an IETF defined mechanism (the allocation of a unique ACh code point) to ensure that it will not interfere with any IETF defined mechanisms. Further, in the case where networks that run the IETF defined solution must be interconnected with a network that runs the ITU solution, then the IETF solution must be used.

The prime objective at the start of the joint work was to ensure that the extensions required to make MPLS fit for use in a transport network are within the MPLS architecture. The proposals from the ITU conform to the MPLS architecture and complement (rather than contradicts) solutions under definition in IETF to meet the needs for the global industry (including those operators that are not satisfied with the IETF solution). It is the IETF who have chosen to characterize the ITU actions as breaking the agreement despite the fact that they have already ignored the proposals in the JWT report.

JWT report proposal on Future inter-SDO organizational structure (slide 5 of the JWT report):

The JWT report indicates that the inter-SDO structure is intended to support collaborative work:

•  It is proposed that the MPLS interop design team, JWT and ad hoc T-MPLS groups continue as described in SG15     
   TD515/PLEN with the following roles:

      –    Facilitate the rapid exchange of information between the IETF and ITU-T
      –    Ensure that the work is progressing with a consistent set of priorities
      –    Identify gaps/inconsistencies in the solutions under development
      –    Propose solutions for consideration by the appropriate WG/Question
      –    Provide guidance when work on a topic is stalled or technical decision must be mediated

The work of these inter-SDO groups was not completed when the MEAD team was disbanded as the ongoing debate on the OAM solution demonstrates. The IETF did not consult the ITU or even inform the ITU on several critical decisions, for example. The unilateral decision by the IETF to adopt the BFD draft as the solution for CC/CV; the refusal to consider draft-bhh-mpls-tp-oam-y1731; to consider the input from the ITU that two solutions should be standardized; all of these decisions were taken by “rough consensus” over strong objections. This is clearly contrary to the collaborative mode of operation described in the JWT report.

History of MPLS OAM:

Y.1711 defined the first OAM tools for MPLS, this made use of a reserved label (14) as defined in RFC3429: Assignment of the 'OAM Alert Label' for Multiprotocol Label Switching Architecture (MPLS) Operation and Maintenance (OAM) Functions. That was published by the IETF in November 2002 as an Informational RFC.

Subsequently the IETF developed some alternative OAM tools for MPLS LSP, they also developed several different tools for use in PWs.
     It should be noted that in these cases the IETF did not declare that this multiplicity of OAM tools is harmful to the integrity of the Internet.

In 2007 the ITU developed draft Recommendation G.8114 documenting OAM tools for T-MPLS, this toolset was backwards compatible with Y.1711. This draft Recommendation was ready for approval in January 2008 G.8114. However, the IETF stated that the method used to detect the OAM packets “violated the MPLS architecture” and claimed that it would be harmful to the Internet. On the basis of these statements the ITU did not approved G.8114 and agreed to work in cooperation with the IETF to develop a solution that conformed to the MPLS architecture.

Note:  More than 40,000 nodes running draft G.8114 OAM have been deployed without any reports of harm to the Internet.

After waiting three years for the IETF to deliver a solution that will meet the needs of its membership SG15 has now voted in favour of solution which conforms to the MPLS architecture and meets the needs of its membership.

Despite all this effort on the part of ITU to collaborate with IETF it is now falsely claiming that ITU reneged on the JWT agreement.

Comparison of MPLS-TP OAM and Ethernet OAM

The figure below illustrates the OAM frame formats for Ethernet and MPLS-TP

In the case of Ethernet the IEEE and ITU mutually agree on the assignment of the OAM OpCode values to differentiate between OAM PDUs defined by the ITU and IEEE. This allows the ITU-T to develop OAM functions targeted at the transport network without any possibility of a clash with IEEE developed protocols.

The Channel Type could offer the same degree of separation if the IETF assigned a channel type for use by the ITU-T for OAM targeted for application in transport networks.

Bookmark 

and Share

 


Monday, March 14, 2011 10:43:24 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, March 03, 2011

New standards that will enable cost-effective smart grid applications such as distribution automation, smart meters, smart appliances and advanced recharging systems for electric vehicles have entered the final stage of approval at ITU.

The G.hnem standards (ITU-T Recommendations) address several smart grid applications such as distribution automation, advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), demand side management (DSM), grid-to-home communications, home/building energy management, home automation, vehicle-to-grid and vehicle-to-charging station communications.

In a standard power system, generation, delivery and consumption of electricity all take place at the same time. This makes the control of supply and demand uniquely challenging. The new standards provide the crucial link between electricity and communications networks, enabling utilities to exercise a higher level of monitoring and control of the grid.

G.hnem is an ideal platform for smart grid applications because of its support of power lines as a communications medium that is under the direct and complete control of power utilities. Since power line communications (PLC) exploit the existing wired infrastructure, the cost to deploy a communications channel is greatly reduced. In addition, because G.hnem supports popular protocols like Ethernet, IPv4 and IPv6, G.hnem-based smart grid networks can easily be integrated with IP-based networks.

Hamadoun Touré, Secretary General, ITU: “Smart Grid is a dynamic addition to today’s energy networks, which will be capable of delivering customizable services on a massive scale. To ensure an efficient global rollout, global standards are a must.”

Malcolm Johnson, Director, Telecommunication Standardization Bureau, ITU: “Many national stimulus plans have given smart grid significant backing, with the need for standards also cited as key to the fast rollout of the technology. The G.hnem standards now entering the final stages of approval can be applied globally today, and are ready to give a much needed boost to power line communications technology, making electricity distribution cleaner, leaner and greener.”

The two G.hnem standards ITU-T G.9955 and G.9956 contain the physical layer specification and the data link layer specification, respectively, for narrowband OFDM power line communications transceivers for communications via alternating current and direct current electric power lines over frequencies below 500 kHz. These ITU-T standards support indoor and outdoor communications over low voltage lines, medium voltage lines, through transformer low-voltage to medium-voltage, and through transformer medium-voltage to low-voltage power lines in both urban and long distance rural communications.

 

Bookmark 
and Share

Thursday, March 03, 2011 9:07:49 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, March 02, 2011

ITU’s recent announcement on an OAM standard for MPLS in transport networks has seen considerable interest, but not always for the right reasons with claims from the Internet Society that it will jeopardize the Internet.

Experts cast doubt on ISOC’s statement: “… ongoing evolution along this path will jeopardize the … Internet”.

They point to the fact that several interoperability tests have been successfully performed with no reported problems. In addition the solution being proposed by ITU conforms to the MPLS-TP architecture as defined by the IETF. When network equipment uses different protocols, interoperability of the functioning of that protocol, in this case OAM, may well be affected. However, since packets for different protocols are identified by pre-assigned different codepoints, protocols running behind these different codepoints will not interfere with each other. This means that the core functionality – in this case Internet traffic – will not be affected. Therefore various protocols can coexist without causing any confusion in the network.

It is also important to understand who has contributed to this standard (draft Recommendation ITU-T G.8113.1) and why. The membership of ITU is made up of representatives from over 700 private sector companies (including most major ICT companies) and 192 Member State governments. In general technical work such as that being discussed here is undertaken by the private sector members. This solution was called for by a majority of the ITU membership in SG15 that has grown frustrated with a lack of progress in the development of a standard which is necessary to meet a market demand. Given that there are over 100,000 MPLS Transport Profile nodes already in transport networks, it is essential that the corresponding OAM toolset is standardized.

As background, in 2006 ITU started work on standards on T-MPLS, which leveraged a sub-set of MPLS that was targeted specifically for application in the transport network. However, in late 2007 the IETF indicated that T-MPLS may be in conflict with IP/MPLS.  The ITU suspended work on T-MPLS and in 2008 agreed to work in cooperation with the IETF on the evolution of MPLS to meet the needs of the transport network. It was anticipated that the five existing Recommendations on T-MPLS would be replaced by mid 2009 with MPLS-TP Recommendations following within a year.

However some of the IETF input (RFCs) required to move forward were not made available and are currently still pending following the unilateral disbanding by the IETF of its group assigned to work with ITU in September 2009.

ITU has issued a formal request for the necessary codepoints from IETF as these codepoints are currently administered by ICANN/IANA and can only be issued by IETF.

ITU collaborates and coordinates, in good faith and on the basis of reciprocity, with other relevant organizations in the development of IP networks to ensure maximum benefits to the global community, in accordance with the decisions of the 2010 ITU Plenipotentiary Conference. However, this should not lead to a situation where the ITU fails to deliver on its commitments to its own membership.

 

Bookmark 
and Share

Wednesday, March 02, 2011 12:52:46 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, February 28, 2011
Geneva, 28 February 2011 – In a big step towards leveraging existing MPLS (Multiprotocol Label Switching) deployment in transport networks, ITU has agreed first stage approval of a key new standard. The ITU-T standard will give network operators the tools necessary to manage large scale deployments of MPLS-based networks. Network operators will now have a choice of OAM (operations, administration and maintenance) tools to best meet their specific transport network requirements. These OAM tools in the hands of network operators will, in particular, allow quick detection of defects and fault isolation.

MPLS is widely embraced in backbone networks as a way to speed up routers. The OAM tools in the ITU-T standard are based on technology proven in carrier grade Ethernet services and legacy transport networks, making it easier for operators to upgrade. In addition to reducing labour costs, network operators will see significantly reduced capital expenditure (CAPEX) costs given that the standard allows for more efficient allocation of bandwidth.

Operators are increasingly looking to MPLS as an end-to-end technology, given its inherent flexibility and support for IP-based applications. The decision was taken together with first stage approval of another standard providing network architecture for MPLS-TP based networks.

Dr Hamadoun Touré, ITU Secretary-General, said: “ITU collaborates and coordinates, in good faith and on the basis of reciprocity, with other relevant organizations in the development of IP networks to ensure maximum benefits to the global community. This is in accordance with the decisions of the 2010 ITU Plenipotentiary Conference. However, this should not lead to a situation where the ITU fails to deliver on its commitments to its own membership. Much effort was made to reach a compromise during last week’s Study Group 15 (SG15) meeting, but the decision was taken very exceptionally by vote, since all attempts at compromise had failed.”

ITU-T SG15 began working on transport profiles for MPLS technology suitable for use in the network layer of transport networks more than three years ago. A joint working team (JWT) was set up to allow Internet Engineering Taskforce (IETF) and ITU experts to work together to avoid divergent work streams. Specifically, it was expected that this group would provide the necessary protocol extensions for ITU’s specifications to work in an MPLS environment. IETF committed to provide its contribution by the second quarter of 2009. However this crucial technical input was not provided and the IETF’s MPLS-TP Interoperability Design Team (MEAD) was unilaterally disbanded by IETF in October 2009.

Malcolm Johnson, Director, Telecommunication Standardization Bureau, ITU: “ITU is a consensus based organization and voting is always a last resort. In this case it was clear that a significant part of our membership could not accept any further delay in pursuing a solution that will give them the ability to address a real market need. Given that there are over 100,000 MPLS-TP nodes already in transport networks, it is essential that the corresponding OAM tool.

Bookmark 

and Share

Monday, February 28, 2011 10:59:36 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, January 20, 2011
Meeting of Study Group 15, Geneva, 14 - 25 February 2011

Registration Form

SG 15 Collective Letter 6

Bookmark 
and Share

Thursday, January 20, 2011 1:00:23 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, September 23, 2010
Study Group 15 WP 1/15, Geneva, Switzerland, 18-22 October 2010

Registration Form

See TSB SG 15 Collective Letter 5 for more information

SG15

Bookmark 
and Share

Thursday, September 23, 2010 1:54:37 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
Study Group 15 Q.4/15 Rapporteur Group, Geneva, Switzerland, 11-15 October 2010

Registration form

See SG 15  for more information

Bookmark 
and Share

Thursday, September 23, 2010 1:49:12 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, August 10, 2010
ITU will be organizing a Tutorial on Optical Fibre Cables and Systems Recommendations in Rwanda from 6 to 17 September 2010. Leading experts will provide an in-depth insight into the ITU-T Recommendations that shape the optical transport networks of the world.
 
The tutorial is co-organized by ITU-T and the Ministry in Charge of Information and Communications Technology of Rwanda, in cooperation with ITU-D. Based on the ITU-T handbook “Optical fibres, cables and systems”, the tutorial is intended to assist engineers, technicians, technologists, mid-level management and regulators in the implementation of optical-fibre-based systems.   
 
Participants will gain a better understanding of the ITU-T standards, how to design and implement projects and how to make the best choices in the various elements of an optical link. They will learn how to prepare a power budget and how to establish parameters for interfaces and accessories to prepare technical specifications for supply contracts. The tutors are leading experts in the field from industry and either participated in the writing of the handbook or contributed to the development of the referenced standards. (Contact: mailto: tsbworkshops@itu.int) more.

Bookmark 
and Share


Tuesday, August 10, 2010 10:17:31 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, June 21, 2010

ITU has agreed on updates to its widely deployed optical transport network (OTN) standards, including ITU-T G.709. The revisions provide mapping of a recently launched next generation high-rate Ethernet standard from IEEE into the OTN.

Collaboration between ITU-T Study Group 15 and the IEEE P802.3ba 40Gb/s and 100Gb/s Ethernet Task Force ensured that these new Ethernet rates are transportable over optical transport networks.

Malcolm Johnson, Director, ITU Telecommunication Standardization Bureau:  “Ethernet has evolved from the local area network of choice to become a real carrier grade solution. Co-hosted meetings and workshops, and a recognition that close collaboration was mutually beneficial, has led IEEE and ITU to agree a common mapping between the IEEE P802.3ba 40Gb/s and 100Gb/s standard and the ITU-T G.709 optical network standard. I have no doubt that the scalability provided by this excellent example of standards collaboration will see an acceleration in end-to-end Ethernet deployment.”

ITU-T Recommendation G.709 “Interfaces for the Optical Transport Network (OTN)” describes a means of communicating data over an optical network. It is a standardized method for transparent transport of services over optical wavelengths in dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM) systems.

Operators are facing challenges with the migration from traditional SDH/SONET to IP/Ethernet based services. ITU-T G.709 OTN is a vehicle to enable convergence, and for providing a common and SONET/SDH-like operational model for network administration, performance monitoring and fault isolation, without altering the individual services.

Using OTN, multiple networks and services such as legacy SONET/SDH, Ethernet, storage protocols and video can all be combined onto a common infrastructure.

Most importantly, unlike SONET/SDH, OTN is the only transport layer in the industry that can carry a full 10/40/100 Gb/s Ethernet signal from IP/Ethernet switches and routers at full bandwidth. With the rapid migration towards IP/Ethernet-based infrastructure, OTN becomes the transport layer of choice for network operators.

Sterling Perrin, Senior Analyst, Heavy Reading: “Heavy Reading network operator surveys have consistently shown strong and immediate operator demand for 100 Gigabit Ethernet, driven by the rapid increase in global IP traffic and exhaustion of existing 10 Gigabit networks. The collaboration by these two standards bodies, and the resulting standard, is exactly what the telecom industry needs to bring the next generation of Ethernet transmission to market. Heavy Reading fully expects this announcement to drive rapid market adoption.”

The amendment to ITU-T G.709 is part of a set of revisions that provide for interworking with the new Ethernet standard. Equipment functions that perform the mapping are part of revised ITU-T G.798, equipment management functions are part of revised ITU-T G.874, and the jitter characteristics of this (and other) mapping(s) are in revised ITU-T G.8251.

A paper that outlines more technical detail related to this announceent can be found below.

John D’Ambrosia, Chair, IEEE P802.3ba Task Force Director: “Developing the next generation of Ethernet required consideration of the entire eco-system in which it resides.  Communications between the IEEE and ITU-T addressed the issues that would impact the end-to-end Ethernet deployment.  This interaction led to the two bodies developing standards that complement each other in order to ensure the optimal solution for 40GbE and 100GbE.  I would like to express my gratitude to the ITU-T for its co-operative efforts with the IEEE P802.3ba Task Force.  Furthermore, I would like to congratulate the ITU-T on the completion of its G.709 specification, which is part of the optimized 40GbE and 100GbE end-to-end solution.”

Bookmark 
and Share

G709publicityv2.doc (32 KB)
Monday, June 21, 2010 8:56:05 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, May 24, 2010
Meeting of ITU-T Study Group 15 - Optical transport networks and access network infrastructures
Geneva, Switzerland, 31 May - 11 June 2010
Registration Form
See ITU-T SG 15 Collective Letter 4 for more information.
Study Group 15 Home

Bookmark 
and Share

Monday, May 24, 2010 2:23:29 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, May 06, 2010
ITU-T and IEEE will hold a joint workshop - The Future of Ethernet Transport - in Geneva, 28 May 2010. The workshop is the fifth in partnership with IEEE and follows two Kaleidoscope events and two workshops in the field of access and transport technologies.

Much work has been done in both organisations to progress Ethernet, developed as an enterprise technology, into a network provider technology or service. The event will focus on opportunities for further collaboration. Long-recognized as the ubiquitous LAN technology, Ethernet is now seeing increased attention as a carrier-grade technology. In part this is due to the convenience of being able to simply provide end-to-end service, but also carriers can realize savings both in terms of capital and operational expenditure.

Ethernet services are becoming popular because they allow carriers to offer considerably improved flexibility to customers through a much simpler and lower cost interface. Ethernet allows users to specify exactly how much bandwidth they want between the 10Mbit/s and emerging 100Gbit/s range currently offered. Further, as a transport technology Ethernet provides reduced operation complexity and improved scalability for carriers. And as operators look to NGN and the use of the Internet Protocol (IP), Ethernet is seen as the best fit, especially given the rise of such services as IP VPNs, VLANs and dedicated Internet access.

This event will review the work areas within ITU-T and IEEE 802.1/802.3 Working Groups on the development of Ethernet and related transport standards. The relevant standards groups are ITU-T Study Group 15 (Questions 6, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14) on optical transport systems including protection switching and synchronization, and IEEE P802.1Qbf Task Force on protection switching, P802.1AS and P802.3bf Task Forces on Ethernet synchronization, and P802.3ba and P802.3bg Task Forces on 40/100 Gb/s Ethernet.

ITU-T and IEEE work’s work on Ethernet technology is complementary in areas such as such as ultra high speed transport, network architecture, services, operation and maintenance, protection switching and synchronization.  In general ITU-T develops requirements from a network operators’ viewpoint as well as functional level specifications, while IEEE develops detailed design specifications to allow implementation.

Bookmark and Share

Thursday, May 06, 2010 2:13:44 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, March 19, 2010

ITU members are being asked to comment on the formation of two new groups examining standards for smart grid and cloud computing.

The proposed Focus Group on Smart Grid and Focus Group on Cloud Computing are expected to identify standardization requirements that will then be taken forward by relevant ITU-T Study Groups.

ITU was asked by key CTOs to accelerate work in the area of smart grid and cloud at a meeting of high level industry executives in Geneva, October 2009.

Smart grid may use technologies based on current telecommunication technologies for control, metering, charging etc. It is this link and the standards needs here that is expected to be explored. In addition the idea that smart grid principles could apply to the telecommunication system itself could be a topic for discussion.

A recently published ITU-T Technology Watch Report titled “Distributed Computing: Utilities, Grids and Clouds” describes the advent of clouds and grids, the applications they enable, and their potential impact on future standardization.

The Focus Group is expected to investigate the relevant requirements for standardization on cloud computing and suggest future study paths for ITU-T. Specifically it may identify potential impacts in standards development in other fields such as NGN, transport layer technologies, ICTs and climate change and media coding.

Comments on the draft terms of reference are invited before Wednesday 14 April 2010. They are available here.

Bookmark and Share
 

Friday, March 19, 2010 11:08:18 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, January 20, 2010

The ITU-T group working on home networking specifications under the G.hn banner has agreed on some specifications for smart grid products. G.hn is a next generation wired home networking standard developed by ITU-T, which supports high-speed communication over power lines, phone lines and coaxial cable.

 

The recent agreement included a ‘low complexity’ profile targeted at smart grid applications. The profile offers a minimum set of G.hn parameters and specifications that define a specific system to meet a targeted range of applications.This will allow multiple manufacturers to develop products that deliver the low power consumption, low cost, performance, reliability, and security that is required for Smart Grid and other lower bit rate applications.

 

Additionally, the low complexity profile also specifies minimum requirements for features such as signal bandwidth, data modulation methods, transmitter linearity requirements, and forward error correction, or “FEC,” while maintaining interoperability with fully-featured G.hn products.

 

Some of the smart grid products that will benefit from G.hn specification include:

  • Smart Meters
  • In-Home Displays and smart thermostats
  • Plug-in Electrical Vehicles and Electrical Vehicle Supply Equipment
  • Smart household appliances such as washing machines, dryers, dishwashers, heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems
  • Energy System Interface devices

Smart grid applications that will benefit from G.hn include:

  • Utility-based Demand Response programs via broadband internet connections or Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems
  • Remote troubleshooting to minimize cost
  • Support for realtime demand response systems that compensate users depending on their usage
  • Flexible control of appliances to reduce power consumption during peak periods


Also agreed was an Appendix to the G.hn standard that provides guidelines for using G.hn in smart grid applications and on how they work with other G.hn-connected consumer devices in the home. The Appendix provides guidance to G.hn product developers and users and describes how G.hn devices can be used as part of application layer Energy Management System software that resides above the G.hn physical layer and data link layer. Additionally, the appendix shows how G.hn smart grid devices interface to a service provider's smart grid access network via the Energy Service interface to support secure end-to-end smart grid services between the service provider and home.

 

In October, HomeGrid Forum, an independent body set up to promote G.hn announced that the standard has received approval from the National Institute Standards Technology (NIST) for use in various smart grid applications in the US. Given this announcement, HomeGrid Forum formed a smart grid initiative group, which will help to bring a range of G.hn-based devices to the smart grid market and home energy management applications.

Bookmark and Share

Wednesday, January 20, 2010 4:48:58 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, October 23, 2009

Meeting of IPTV-GSI - IPTV Global Standards Initiative

Geneva, 26-30 October 2009

Registration form

See TSB Circular 56 for more information.

IPTV-GSI Home

Friday, October 23, 2009 9:19:03 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, October 21, 2009
ITU voice coding and home networking articles published by IEEE

The latest IEEE Communications Magazine (subscription needed) contains a special feature on ITU-T Coders For Wideband, Superwideband, and Fullband Speech Communication. In addition the issue contains an overview of the new G.hn home networking standard from ITU.

The feature is part of a formalised cooperation between the standardization sector of ITU (ITU-T) and IEEE Communications Society. Also published recently are the best papers from the first Kaleidoscope academic conference.

The articles on speech coding:
Bookmark and Share


Wednesday, October 21, 2009 1:36:53 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 20, 2009
G.hn standard for wired home networking gets international approval

Geneva, 15 October 2009 — ITU has approved a cutting-edge technical standard that will usher in new era in ‘smart home’ networking systems and applications. Called ‘G.hn’, the new standard will enable service providers to deploy new offerings, including High Definition TV (HDTV) and digital Internet Protocol TV (IPTV), more cost effectively. It will also allow consumer electronics manufacturers to seamlessly network all types of home entertainment, home automation and home security products, and greatly simplify consumers’ purchasing and installation processes.

full press release

Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, October 20, 2009 11:36:40 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, October 15, 2009
A revision to key Optical Transport Network (OTN) standard - Recommendation ITU-T G.709 - extends its applicability to 40 and 100 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE). This revision also adds a variable-size switchable container (ODUflex) to the OTN hierarchy to more efficiently carry packet and constant bit rate clients, which did not fit well into the traditional fixed-size OTN containers. OTN mappings for storage area network (SAN) interfaces and mobile interfaces are also a part of this new revision.

ITU-T Recommendation G.709 "Interfaces for the optical transport network (OTN)" describes a means of communicating data over an optical network. It is a standardized method for transparent transport of services over optical wavelengths in DWDM systems.

Operators are facing challenges with the migration from traditional SDH/SONET to IP/Ethernet based services. The ITU-T G.709 OTN standard is a vehicle to enable convergence, and for providing a common and SONET/SDH-like operational model for network administration, performance monitoring and fault isolation, without altering the individual services.

Using OTN, multiple networks and services such as legacy SONET/SDH, Ethernet, storage protocols and video can all be combined onto a common infrastructure.

Most importantly, unlike SONET/SDH, OTN is the only transport layer in the industry that can carry a full 10/40/100 GbE LAN PHY from IP/Ethernet switches and routers at full bandwidth. With the rapid migration towards IP/Ethernet-based infrastructure, OTN becomes the transport layer of choice for network operators.



Bookmark and Share

Thursday, October 15, 2009 9:53:05 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
The recent Study Group 15 meeting saw agreement on a new standard that defines Ethernet ring protection switching (ERPS) in multiple rings.

The work has been driven by the move by operators to offer Ethernet services with the same level of service protection offered in networks based on synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH).

The standard gives sub-50 millisecond (ms) protection for Ethernet traffic in a ring topology and at the same time ensures that there are no loops formed at the Ethernet layer. The protocol is said to be robust enough to work for unidirectional failure and multiple link failure scenarios.

Experts say that there are already products on the market deploying the standard.

G.8032 offers a flexible topology with single or interconnected multi-rings; broad applications for access, metro, and core networks; support for Ethernet speeds (1/10/40/100GbE MAC); support for multiple Ethernet services; client-server agnostics and OPEX and CAPEX savings.

Bookmark and Share

Thursday, October 15, 2009 9:31:00 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, May 14, 2009
Networking vendor Ciena has announced plans to deploy 100 Gigabits per second (Gb/s) Ethernet network equipment to connect NYSE Euronext’s New York and London datacenters. The equipment will connect the respective trading floors over a single optical wavelength with the lowest latency possible.
 
Expected to be operational in 2010, the network equipment will make use of an upcoming extension of ITU-T G.709/Y.1331 currently under discussion in Study Group 15, ITU-T’s Study Group on optical transport networks and access network infrastructures.

G.709/Y.1331 defines “Interfaces for the Optical Transport Network (OTN)”. OTN is presently offered at three bit rates, OTU1 (~2.7 Gb/s), OTU2 (~10.7 Gb/s) and OTU3 (~43 Gb/s), where the latter corresponds to the highest bandwidth on a single wavelength commercially deployed today.

OTU4 will define a transport interface capable of carrying the 100 Gigabit Ethernet client signal studied in IEEE’s P802.3ba 40 Gb/s and 100 Gb/s Ethernet Task Force.

Also see background papers by NORDUnet, Nortel and NTT describing the transition to 100G and the related standardization activities.

delicious.small.gif Bookmark with Del.icio.us

100x20-digg-button.gif

Thursday, May 14, 2009 1:43:45 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, April 09, 2009

ITU-T has published a Guide on the use of the ITU-T Recommendations related to Optical Technology. Currently available in PDF form – here – it is expected printed versions will be made available shortly. The publication of the guide is - in part - to meet the requirements of WTSA-08 Resolution 44 - Bridging the standardization gap between developing and developed countries.

The guide starts with a short but interesting history of optical technology noting that the capacity of optical systems has jumped by a factor of more than 10,000 over a period of 20 years. In the same time it also notes that the applications of optical technology have progressively moved from short distance links (a few tens of km) to very long distance links in backbone networks, completely replacing traditional copper cabling. In the last few years it charts the arrival of optical technology in access networks.

The practical part of the guide contains a functional grouping of Study Group 15 Recommendations on optical technology e.g. optical fibres and cables, physical optical interfaces, optical fibre submarine cable systems. An introduction to each category with more than one Recommendation outlines the subjects which are common to that category. For each Recommendation there is a short description of the purpose, the content and, in many cases, the evolution of the content in subsequent versions of Recommendations. There are also cross-references to other related Recommendations.

The main purpose of this Guide is to give to developing countries improved capability in the application of standards. It is also seen as benefiting the wider telecommunication industry, particularly manufacturers and operators, which could benefit from the greater involvement of developing countries in the making and application of standards. Experts also point out that the value of the guide could to a wider group of manufacturers and operators than those directly involved in optical technologies.

delicious.small.gif Bookmark with Del.icio.us

100x20-digg-button.gif

Thursday, April 09, 2009 9:14:51 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Clarifications regarding work on MPLS functionality to address the needs of the transport network were made at the December meeting of Study Group 15 (see previous newslog entry) with experts from the IETF and ITU-T present.

The two organizations have been working on the development of a transport profile for MPLS technology referred to as “MPLS-TP”.

IETF and ITU management have again underlined their commitment to work together in the interest of the ICT industry and its customers.

Key agreements are clarified in a document here.

In summary it says:

  • There is no agreement, or proposal to cancel or deprecate the [ITU-T] T-MPLS Recommendations currently in force.
  • It was clarified that the statement that ITU-T would "terminate work on current T-MPLS" should be understood to mean that ITU-T will not undertake any further work to progress T-MPLS.
  • There is no intent to prevent the ITU-T from having a future role in MPLS-TP standardization.

The following agreements were reached concerning current T-MPLS:

  • The current T-MPLS Recommendations remain in force, unchanged, until the next updates that will result in aligning them with the jointly developed MPLS-TP architecture.
  • There will be no other update (amendment, revision) to these Recommendations prior to the ones for aligning with MPLS-TP, at which time the name will be changed to reflect the new content.

delicious.small.gif Bookmark with Del.icio.us

100x20-digg-button.gif



Tuesday, March 10, 2009 10:56:19 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, December 12, 2008

The first global standard offering an in-home, high-speed network capable of delivering room-to-room HDTV has been agreed by ITU. The standard, published under the G.hn banner, promises high quality multimedia over power, coaxial, phone and other home wiring. It will give up to 20 times the throughput of existing wireless technologies and three times that of existing wired technologies.

The specifications will be used by chip manufacturers to build transceivers that can be incorporated into set-top boxes, residential gateways, home computers, home audio systems, DVD players, TVs or any other device that might be connected to a network now or in the future. Experts say that silicon companies will immediately start incorporating the specifications into transceivers, implying that G.hn-compliant products could be on the market as early as 2010.

Joyce Putscher, Principal Analyst at market research firm In-Stat, said, “Service operators have been looking for an international standard that encompasses multiple existing-wire mediums for video distribution. G.hn meets that requirement and it seems clear that with significant industry backing from service providers, semiconductor and equipment vendors, and the fast rate at which the process is moving to achieve a standard, we will see first equipment by 2010.”

“There’s a clear market need for a unified networking approach,” said Malcolm Johnson, Director of ITU’s Telecommunication Standardization Bureau. “With G.hn, every wire in every home around the world can become part of a home entertainment network. This will enable seamless communication between computers, HDTVs and telephones over existing wires. I expect that this exciting new technology will also foster innovations such as energy efficient smart appliances, home automation and telemedicine devices.”

Work on G.hn was started at the instigation of service providers looking to extend broadband and video services in the home. As well as its offer of greater speed, it may be bundled as complementary to Wi-Fi where G.hn offers greater coverage, extending, for example, to areas of a house where Wi-Fi does not reach.

The standard has achieved remarkable industry backing even before its publication. An industry group — the HomeGrid Forum — has been formed specifically to back G.hn. The goal of HomeGrid Forum is to market G.hn worldwide and to create a compliance and interoperability programme to ensure that products based on the standard will operate in any home around the world.

Other industry analysts backing the standard include Michael Wolf, Research Director at ABI Research. “If G.hn sees integration into carrier devices by 2010, we expect that some 42 million G.hn-compliant nodes will ship in 2013 in devices such as set-top boxes, residential gateways and other service provider CPE hardware,” Wolf said.

“A single, unified technology for multimedia networks over power lines, coaxial cable, and phone lines has the potential to enable a simple, easy-to-use means of networking devices in the home,” said Kurt Scherf, analyst with market analyst firm Parks Associates. “We believe ITU’s work is an important step towards eliminating fragmentation in the industry and in achieving the vision of a networked home.”

Recommendation ITU-T G.9960 focuses on the physical or PHY layer, giving the data bit rate and quality of service necessary for triple-play residential services as well as business-type services delivered over xDSL, PON, or other access technology. In step with ITU guidelines on new standards development, several power saving modes have been incorporated. Ongoing work is focused on the media access control (MAC) layer.

Friday, December 12, 2008 1:08:25 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, November 21, 2008

Study Group 15 - Optical transport networks and access network infrastructures

Geneva, 01-12 December 2008

Registration Form

See TSB Collective 6/15 for more information.

Study Group 15 Home

Friday, November 21, 2008 5:31:39 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, November 04, 2008

The latest issue of IEEE Communications Magazine features a number of articles on ITU-T.

As well as a general article on the challenges faced by ITU-T, more detailed pieces focus on working methods, initiatives on climate change, audio coding, optical transport and bridging the standardization gap.

An electronic version of the publication can be seen here.

Tuesday, November 04, 2008 12:58:34 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, June 11, 2008

NXTComm, June 16-19, Las Vegas, USA will see ITU-T members, and guests stage an interoperability showcase for fibre to the premises (FTTP) related standards.

ITU, together with Telcordia, have collaborated to organize a multi-company interoperability demonstration featuring gigabit passive optical network (G-PON) equipment built according to the ITU-T G.984 series of Recommendations (standards) , including the recently consented G-PON reach extender (ITU-T G.984.6). PON technology is used in the local loop environment to cost effectively connect residential and small and medium enterprises (SME) end users premises in an all-fibre network.

The G-PON Pavilion features live demonstrations of G-PON equipment interoperability; with interoperability being a critical enabler to reducing G-PON equipment costs. Triple-play interoperability demonstrations are provided by the following device and equipment manufactures: Cambridge Industries Group, Freescale Semiconductor, Iamba Network, Ikanos Communications, LS Cable, XAVi Technologies, ZTE Corporation. Corning is providing a bend-insensitive fibre (built to ITU-T G.657 specs) based optical distribution network over which the 2488 Mbps/1244 Mbps (downstream/upstream) G-PON systems will be operating.

With PONs, signals are carried by lasers and sent to their destination without the need for active electronics in the outside plant of the telecommunications network. Carriers can realize significant savings with fiber sharing in the local loop, equipment sharing in the central office and by eliminating the dependence on expensive active network elements.

ITU-T’s G.984series Recommendations detail gigabit PONs (G-PON), the latest generation of PON technology. With gigabit capacity today and the ability to transparently support future capacity upgrades through ITU-T G.984.5 compatible overlays, ITU-T G.984-based systems should more than satisfy foreseeable customer demands. G-PON (ITU-T G.984.6) reach extender solutions allow operation over as much as 60 km of fiber, with split ratios as high as 1x128.

Wednesday, June 11, 2008 8:26:37 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, June 04, 2008

Next meeting of the Internet Protocol Television Global Standards Initiative (IPTV-GSI)

Geneva, 23-27 June 2008

Registration Form

See TSB Circular 221 for more information.

IPTV GSI Home

Wednesday, June 04, 2008 11:10:36 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, April 21, 2008

Fears that a set of next-generation network transport specifications developed by ITU-T could cause interoperability problems have been allayed.

The IETF and ITU will work together to extend IETF MPLS functionality to address the needs of the transport network. The work will move forward recognizing that the sole design authority for MPLS resides in the IETF, and the domain of expertise for Transport Network Infrastructure resides in ITU-T SG15.

ITU-T has been developing extensions to Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) MPLS to address the requirements of the transport network (T-MPLS). However, concerns were raised by the IETF that the approach taken by the ITU-T was incompatible with widely deployed - MPLS - technology. These concerns have been allayed with the agreement that the IETF and ITU-T will work jointly on the development of a transport profile for MPLS technology which will now be referred to as “MPLS-TP”.

The Joint Working Team (see previous newslog entry) consisting of experts from the IETF and ITU-T has recommended that IETF MPLS technology should be extended to meet the requirements of the transport network. The proposal is based on technical analysis that showed that the IETF MPLS architecture can be extended to provide the functionality required by the transport network as defined by ITU-T's Study Group 15. The ITU-T has accepted this proposal and the IETF will develop a transport profile for MPLS (MPLS-TP) with input from ITU-T to ensure that the requirements of the transport network are fully addressed. Details of the proposal and the technical consideration are available here.

Malcolm Johnson, Director, ITU Telecommunication Standardization Bureau said, "Given the complexity of today’s networks it is inevitable that we will, from time-to-time, see divergent approaches. What is important is that we quickly agree on a way forward. The experts in the joint group have worked hard to find a cooperative solution rather than going our separate ways. This is an excellent result and bodes well for the future collaboration between ITU and IETF".”

Russ Housley Chair of the IETF, "I am very optimistic about the outcome, and I see this as a significant milestone in the cooperation between the ITU-T and the IETF."

 

Monday, April 21, 2008 2:45:41 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, February 28, 2008

ITU experts have reported a good spirit of cooperation following a meeting with counterparts from the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) on the topic of T-MPLS, during February’s Study Group 15 meeting in Geneva.

The Ad-Hoc Group on T-MPLS met to iron out perceived inconsistencies between MPLS developed by IETF and T-MPLS developed in ITU-T. The meeting appointed Malcolm Betts as ITU representative and Dave Ward from IETF.

A joint working team (JWT) has been created with experts from ITU-T and IETF.

Previously the IETF requested that the ITU-T either: (1) Work in cooperation to extend the IETF's MPLS technologies through the IETF Standards Process or: (2) Decide to use its own Ethertypes and maintain separation of codepoints in the future, change the name of the technology so it is not easily confused with IETF MPLS and work independently.

The JWT will allow the IETF and ITU-T to work in close collaboration on T-MPLS to understand the implications of these options and facilitate the subsequent development of solutions that ensure that the required degree of MPLS/T-MPLS compatibility, consistency, and coherence, recognizing that the sole design authority for MPLS resides in the IETF, and the domain of expertise for Transport Network Infrastructure resides in ITU-T SG15.

It is expected that the group will use remote collaboration tools and make a decision on which way to progress by April 2008. See also previous newslog entry here.

MPLS is widely embraced in backbone networks as a way to speed up routers. Lately some have advocated its use further downstream in access networks, there have even been suggestions to extend this as far as customer premises. ITU’s work seeks to support this, but additionally to allow the seamless interworking between Ethernet and MPLS. This has been progressed in SG 15 through the completion of a new set of Recommendations for Transport MPLS (T-MPLS), a technology which uses a subset of the components defined in the MPLS Layer Network Architecture of Recommendation G.8110 to support packet transport applications that adhere to ITU-T layer network architecture principles. A T-MPLS layer network can operate independently of its clients and its associated control networks (i.e., multi-carrier or single carrier networks (MCN, SCN) and can carry a variety of client traffic types. This independence affords network operators the freedom necessary to design robust packet transport networks for their own use and to transport customer traffic. T-MPLS is designed to behave consistently with existing transport technologies, thus offering the operational characteristics, performance and reliability that network operators require from carrier-class technologies. The new Recommendations for this technology cover the T-MPLS layer network architecture (G.8110.1/Y.1370.1), interfaces for the T-MPLS Hierarchy (G.8112/Y.1371), and T-MPLS Equipment (G.8121/Y.1381).

Thursday, February 28, 2008 8:53:49 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, February 22, 2008

Senior technical experts have laid down the gauntlet on energy saving in ICTs following a recent meeting in Geneva.

Following tutorials on power saving, at a recent meeting of ITU-T’s Study Group 15 (SG 15), experts agreed to work towards a proposed percentage reduction of power consumption in broadband technologies. The aim is for the agreed figure to form part of a Resolution from the upcoming World Telecommunication Standardization Assembly (WTSA-08). Reduction of power consumption should and can be done without the degradation of services according to experts. Presentations from the tutorials are available here.

The UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon has also underlined ITU’s role here saying: "ITU is one of the very important stakeholders in the area of climate change." ITU representatives made a statement at the UN Conference on Climate Change in Bali, Indonesia, illustrating how ICTs are both a cause and a potential cure for climate change.

Speaking during the event attended by over 100 representatives from the ICT industry worldwide for each of its three, hour-long sessions, Deputy Secretary-General of ITU, Houlin Zhao expressed appreciation that the meetings had proven so popular at such an early stage of the work. He pointed out that ICTs are responsible for 2.5 per cent of carbon emissions. This is roughly the equivalent of the airline industry and requires our urgent attention, he said.

The issue of power saving will be discussed within the wider context of climate change at Symposia on ICTs and Climate Change, to be held April 15-16 2008 in Kyoto, Japan, hosted by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC) and 17-18 June 2008 in London, hosted by BT. The events are part of a new initiative by ITU to better understand how ICTs can help mitigate and adapt to climate change as well as monitoring its impact.

Experts speaking at the SG 15 tutorials pointed to inefficiencies in terms of end-device power consumption level compared to the signal power. The deployment of broadband access networks is of particular concern as operators worldwide rollout this new technology that some predict will massively increase power demands.

Some simple measures, for example specifying power saving modes in network terminations such as: ‘asleep’, ‘standby’, as well as ‘on’ and ‘off’, were cited by speakers. It was also noted that next-generation networks (NGN) can lower greenhouse gas emissions by reducing network complexity, and introducing equipment that is more tolerant to natural climatic conditions and therefore does not require air conditioning. Smart buildings, energy supply and transport industries must all play their part in achieving greenhouse gas reductions.

A first and completed task of the ITU experts has been to create a power saving checklist for standards authors. Malcolm Johnson, Director of the Telecommunication Standardization Bureau, ITU congratulated SG 15 for responding so quickly to the request to address climate change. He urged all Study Groups to start the process of reviewing their Recommendations (ITU’s name for standards) according to the new checklist and assign appropriate metrics regarding reduction of greenhouse gases.

The checklist is intended to ensure that standards are drafted taking into account the most economic and energy-efficient solution. It is essentially, a set of questions relating to energy saving in networks. Experts propose that each new ITU-T Recommendation should contain a clause that identifies its impact on climate change and demonstrates ways that it contributes towards emission reduction, covering both production and the use of the equipment.

In order that this work is completed with the highest degree of efficiency there is broad consensus that ITU action has to be taken in partnership with all other bodies working in the field and that everything is done to avoid duplication of work.

Friday, February 22, 2008 3:59:40 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, February 08, 2008

ITU, together with Telcordia, are again collaborating to organize a multi-company interoperability demonstration featuring gigabit passive optical network (G-PON) equipment built according to the ITU-T G.984 Recommendation. Participating companies are now being finalized, with interested companies being requested to contact Rob Bond (rbond@telcordia.com), G-PON Pavilion Coordinator, by Monday February 25, 2008. Any optical access system, customer premises equipment, or G-PON device vendor with commercial products compliant with G.984 series Recommendations are eligible to participate.


The interoperability demonstration featured in the ITU G-PON (G.984) Pavilion at NXTcomm 2008 may include both traditional FTTP-focused G-PON technology, as well as emerging applications such as G-PON fed xDSL services, Enhancement band operation (G.984.5), and G-PON Reach Extender demonstrations (G.984.re). More information is contained in the ITU G-PON Pavilion fact sheet.

Friday, February 08, 2008 9:38:22 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, February 01, 2008

In the context of ITU-T's efforts to address climate change issues, Study Group 15 will hold three tutorials on energy saving techniques during its February meeting.

A checklist for developers of standards is already under development in SG 15. The technologies considered in the list include optical transport networks and access network transport technologies such as digital subscriber line (DSL) and Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Networks (GPON). Together these technologies represent a significant consumption of energy worldwide. The idea is that the checklist is applied before the work commences, during the work and after the completion of the work. The use of the checklist should ideally be complemented by involving energy efficiency experts and users in the process.

The tutorials to be held 13, 14 and 15 February will look at the checklist as well as topics such as energy efficient Ethernet and opportunities and techniques for power saving in DSL and PON. A general introduction to the issues surrounding ICTs and climate change, (to be addressed in two upcoming ITU Symposia on ICTs and Climate Change), and an update on the outcome of the UN Climate Change Conference in Bali, December 2007, will be included.

Friday, February 01, 2008 9:27:47 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, December 17, 2007
 Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Study Group 15 - Optical and other transport network infrastructures

Study Group 15 Meeting

Geneva, 11-22 February 2008

Registration Form

See TSB Collective-letter 5/15 for more information.

Study Group 15 Home

Tuesday, December 11, 2007 6:11:34 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, December 03, 2007

An Information Note from the ITU IS Department is available to help you configure your laptop for the ITU's Wireless LAN.

See the EWM FAQs page

Monday, December 03, 2007 9:30:58 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, November 19, 2007

Do you remember your last video conference? Blurry faces on tiny screens, with sound that doesn’t quite synchronize with the stilted movement of the lips. After the laborious setup of cameras and microphones, you seem to spend more time worrying about technical problems than talking about the topic at hand, with repeated loss of connection. As frustration grows, and attention wanders, it is difficult to avoid the feeling that you should have arranged a face-to-face meeting instead.

 

A new set of technologies – referred to as Telepresence – will give users the illusion of sitting on the opposite side of the remote party’s conference table. High-definition (HD) video images and audio are transmitted via packed-based Next-Generation Networks (NGN), connecting conference rooms around the world, and covering distances of thousands of miles with zero latency. While the network infrastructure remains transparent to the user, vendors equip conference rooms with high-end displays, cameras, loudspeakers and furniture to enhance the conferencing experience. Telepresence-systems are already available on the market, and involved companies go as far as identifying the technology as a potential billion dollar market, for solution vendors as well as for network service providers (NSP).

 

A new ITU-T Briefing Report on Telepresence has been released as part of the Technology Watch function, which evaluates the market potential and different fields of application of Telepresence solutions in both, developed and developing countries. The report notes the standardization work currently going on in ITU, including the consideration of migrating currently used multimedia protocols, such as H.323 and SIP into a new generation of multimedia protocols, called H.325 or Advanced Multimedia Systems (AMS), that takes into consideration special aspects of security, flexibility, QoS, and support for mobile devices. This report is the second of a new series of Technology Watch Briefing Reports looking at emerging new technologies.

Monday, November 19, 2007 11:23:00 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 30, 2007

Next meeting of TSAG - Telecommunication Standardization Advisory Group

Geneva, 3-7 December 2007

Registration Form

See TSB Collective-letter 5/TSAG for more information.

TSAG Home

Tuesday, October 30, 2007 11:48:06 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 16, 2007

Experts from the standardization sector of ITU (ITU-T) and the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) have agreed to recommend progression of Transport-MPLS (T-MPLS) standards work in a way that ensures compatibility, consistency, and coherence of MPLS technology when used in transport networks. The recommended approach, which recognizes and leverages ITU-T and IETF design expertise and authority, is expected to resolve concerns raised regarding usage of common Ethertypes for IETF MPLS and T-MPLS when running over an Ethernet backbone. Broader review and approval of the proposal by the two standards bodies is expected in the coming months.

The experts proposed in a joint statement that "The IETF and ITU-T will work in close collaboration on T-MPLS" and that "a joint working team of experts from the IETF and ITU-T be established to propose how to progress the various aspects of the requirements, solutions, and architecture for the T-MPLS work." The initial goal of the working team will be to examine T-MPLS work, and foster "an agreement on leadership roles and the modifications necessary to develop an architecture that it is compatible, coherent and consistent between both transport and IETF MPLS technologies."

Yoichi Maeda, Chairman of ITU-T's Study Group 15, home of the T-MPLS work said: "This type of agreement is a characteristic of the spirit of cooperation that exists between ITU-T and IETF. Both organizations understand that in order to meet the needs of industry it's imperative to quickly resolve differences and avoid duplication of work."

"Future work," the proposal states, "will be progressed by first analyzing the requirements and desired functionality." Since T-MPLS utilizes MPLS functionality extensively, the experts recommend that, "The IETF Standards Process will be used for extensions or modifications of IETF MPLS Technology." It was clearly noted that there are aspects of the problem space that lie outside the domain of expertise in the IETF or straddle both organizations, e.g., management of transport equipment, and some aspects of OAM and survivability. The working team will be tasked to help identify which of these aspects are best standardized in IETF RFCs and which in ITU-T Recommendations.

T-MPLS has been under development for three years in ITU-T with four specifications published, including an architecture document, a network-to-network interface (NNI), an equipment specification and a protection switching document. T-MPLS draws extensively on IETF MPLS, a foundation of more than 50 RFCs published by the IETF MPLS and PWE3 Working Groups over the last eight years.

100x20-digg-button.gif

Tuesday, October 16, 2007 9:53:28 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Optical Expo is a Light Reading event 2-3 October in Dallas.

Under the session heading The Drive to 100-GigE, Steve Trowbridge, Vice Chairman of ITU-T Study Group 15, will provide the latest updates on ITU standardization efforts as the industry moves to 40 Gbit/s and ultimately 100-GigE.

Tuesday, September 25, 2007 4:59:20 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, September 07, 2007

Standards produced by ITU — ITU-T Recommendations — are now available without charge. The announcement follows a highly successful trial conducted from January−October 2007, during which some two million ITU-T Recommendations were downloaded throughout the world.

The experiment’s aim was to “increase the visibility and easy availability of the output of ITU-T”. Offering standards for free is a significant step for the standards community as well as the wider information and communication technologies (ICT) industry. Now, anyone with Internet access will be able to download one of over 3000 ITU-T Recommendations that underpin most of the world’s ICT. The move further demonstrates ITU’s commitment to bridging the digital divide by extending the results of its work to the global community.

Director of ITU’s Telecommunication Standardization Bureau (TSB) Malcolm Johnson, presenting the results of the trial to the 2007 meeting of ITU’s Council, said that not only had the experiment been a success in raising awareness of ITU-T, it would also attract new members. Most importantly, he noted, it had helped efforts to bridge the “standardization gap” between countries with resources to pursue standardization issues and those without. “There has been very positive feedback from developing countries,” said Johnson. “Last year exactly 500 ITU-T Recommendations had been sold to developing countries; this year, after allowing free access, they have downloaded some 300 000.”

ITU-T Recommendations are developed in a unique contribution-driven and consensus-based environment by industry and government members, with industry providing the most significant input. A strong focus of current standards work is providing the foundations for the so-called next-generation network (NGN). Other key areas include IPTV, ICT in vehicles, cybersecurity, quality of service, multimedia, emergency communications and standards for access, such as VDSL 2 — very high speed digital subscriber line 2, the newest and most advanced standard of DSL broadband wireline communications.

Friday, September 07, 2007 8:40:44 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, September 05, 2007

The Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF) will host the results of an interoperability demonstration at ECOC 2007, Berlin, Germany. The event will show how a suite of ITU-T standards enable on-demand Ethernet services.

Seven global telecommunication carriers taking part will provide test facilities, engineering staff and network connectivity.

The demonstration will highlight dynamic Ethernet services over multiple, control plane-enabled intelligent optical core networks, including:
- Ethernet Private Line service
- Non-disruptive bandwidth modification
- Graceful recovery from control plane or signaling network failures

See the OIF’s press release.

Wednesday, September 05, 2007 8:39:59 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, July 10, 2007

At the June 2007 meeting of ITU-T SG15, a Recommendation that helps to future proof gigabit capable passive optical networks (G-PON) was consented.

The Recommendation, G.984.5, defines wavelength ranges which are reserved for additional service signals to be overlaid via wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) in future gigabit capable passive optical networks (G-PON). The Recommendation also specifies the wavelength blocking filters to be implemented in optical network terminations (ONT). These filters, together with the use of the specified wavelength ranges, will enable network operators to upgrade G-PON systems without a break in service to their customers.’

Tuesday, July 10, 2007 3:50:49 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

At the June 2007 meeting of ITU-T SG15, work continued on a draft new Recommendation to develop a single international standard for home networking transceivers using any metallic media in the home – phoneline wiring, data cable (e.g. CAT5), coaxial cable or powerline wiring.

Household connectivity is growing rapidly with more and more electronic devices and networks within the home distributing and using digital information and media. In addition, remote control of lighting, heating, appliance-use and security systems attached to the home are making the "digital home" a reality.

International standards that enable interoperability and security in the field of home networking are seen as key to bringing value and versatility to consumers, making possible the use of diverse products, services and sources, and therefore accelerating market development.

Work in ITU-T is coordinated by the Joint Coordination Activity on Home Networking (JCA-HN). Topics covered across the 13 different Study Groups of ITU-T include digital rights management (DRM), phone-line networking (including co-ax), IPTV, interactive video, set top box architecture and cable modems.

The work on ITU-T Rec - G.hn - next generation home networking transceivers - has now attracted a critical mass of contributors/participants with nine companies submitting 20 contributions on various topics. It is anticipated that G.hn will be completed in 2008.

Also at the June 2007 meeting of ITU-T SG15, it was agreed to start work on a draft new Recommendation G.hnta on home network transport architecture. The Rec will give a generic architecture based on the NGN functional architecture described in Recommendation Y.2012 “Next Generation Networks – Frameworks and functional architecture models” It will describe a platform for the development of future home network standards. The draft Recommendation G.hnta is complementary to draft Recommendation H.ghna currently under development by SG16.

Tuesday, July 10, 2007 3:48:58 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, July 02, 2007

A second standard in a new group of Recommendations from ITU-T's Study Group 15 extends the distance at which multi-vendor DWDM systems can be deployed from 80 to four or five hundred kilometres.

The first standard in the series gave network operators the ability to deploy multi-vendor dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) systems in a metro environment. The new Recommendation extends this to cover regional environments by taking into account the use of optical amplifiers and their potential to create 'optical noise'.

WDM technology is used by the owners of optical fibres to maximise their capacity. The technology achieves this by simultaneously operating an optical fibre pair at more than one wavelength and uses optical amplification to increase transmission distances as well as optical add/drop multiplexers to increase the flexibility of the network. Since operators wish to maximize their cable plant investments and deploy increasingly bandwidth hungry services in a multi-vendor environment, standards development in this field is seen as crucial.

The Recommendation defines values for single-channel optical interface parameters of physical point-to-point and ring DWDM applications on single-mode optical fibres through the use of the "black-link" approach. The black-links covered by this follow-on Recommendation may contain optical amplifiers.

The transport network of most operators is based on the use of equipment from a variety of different vendors. Previously, for those parts of the network involving DWDM optical transmission, this has been achieved via the use of optical transponders which convert the single channel interfaces like those defined in ITU-T Recs G.957 G.691, G.693, G.959.1 into DWDM wavelengths suitable for the particular vendor’s proprietary system. With the optical interfaces standardized in new G.698.2 operators can directly connect a wide variety of equipment to the DWDM line system without the need for those additional short reach transmitter and receiver pair per channel (eliminating the transponders) with obvious associated cost savings.

Monday, July 02, 2007 8:36:16 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, June 18, 2007

Another step towards all optical networks (AON) has been achieved with the consent of the new Recommendation G.680 by ITU-T's Study Group 15.

The Recommendation will allow operators to take optical add/drop multiplexers (OADMs) and photonic cross-connects (PXCs) from different vendors and integrate them in to an all optical network without having to add expensive optical/electrical/optical conversion (O/E/Os).

This achievement is made possible as the Rec gives operators a way to evaluate the end-to-end quality of a signal where photonic cross-connects (PXC) and optical add/drop multiplexers (OADMs) are deployed. In addition, experts say that the evolution towards an AON could significantly reduce costs for operators by reducing the need for costly optical/electrical/electrical (O/E/O) conversion. As optical transport networks (OTN) evolve, the number of - expensive - O/E/O conversions within their boundaries is coming down.

The two main reasons for the reduction in the number of O/E/O conversions are that DWDM systems are becoming capable of carrying light signals for thousands of kilometers without electrical regeneration and that PXCs and OADMs are becoming available with the capacity, space requirements, power consumption, reliability and cost, suitable for their use in the telecommunication networks. With this evolution experts predict that AONs could extend to all potential routes of the backbone network of a medium size country - optical paths up to around 2,000 km.

The Recommendation defines a "degradation function" of optical network elements (ONEs) such as photonic cross connects (PXCs), optical add-drop multiplexers (OADMs), etc. making up an optical network. It enables the degradation of the signal quality in an all-optical network consisting of ONEs including DWDM line segments to be assessed.

Monday, June 18, 2007 9:14:28 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

An upgrade to a widely used specification for fibre optic cables will allow the simpler deployment of Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) in FTTH applications up to 500 m link distance. The original Recommendation ITU-T Rec G.651 provided specifications for multimode fibre which is currently widely deployed for data communications, but not for telecoms.

The work was initiated given two observations; the cost disparity between telecom and data networks, where high speed GbE telecom equipment is often far more expensive than datacom equipment; and the economics of rolling out FTTH into multi-tenant (apartment) buildings where there is a high subscriber density. Ethernet is increasingly seen as an end-to-end technology.

Similar to recently published Rec G.657 on single mode fibre, Recommendation G.651.1 allows for increased cable flexibility. This increased flexibility in a fibre optic cable means that operators can follow tighter corners in buildings and can worry less if cables / fibres are laid with a sharp bend. This all makes installation work more engineer friendly leading also to less re-work. Moreover the closures for fibres can be half the size, important where space is at a premium especially in multi-tenant buildings.

G.651.1 retains many of the key characteristics of its well known predecessor. However manufacturing tolerances and transmission characteristics have been improved significantly. In addition, it has been harmonized fully with relevant IEC standards.

Monday, June 18, 2007 9:10:50 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, May 18, 2007

NXTComm, June 18-21, Chicago will see ITU-T members, and guests stage an interoperability showcase for fibre to the premises (FTTP) related standards.

ITU, together with Telcordia, have collaborated to organize a multi-company interoperability demonstration featuring gigabit passive optical network (G-PON) equipment built according to the ITU-T G.984 Recommendation. PON technology is used in the local loop environment to cost effectively connect residential and Small and medium enterprises (SME) end users premises in an all-fibre network.

The G-PON Pavilion features live demonstrations of G-PON equipment interoperability; with interoperability being a critical enabler to reducing G-PON equipment costs. Triple-play interoperability demonstrations are provided by the following device and equipment manufactures: Alphion, Cambridge Industries Group, Hitachi, Huawei, iamba Networks, LS Cable, PMC-Sierra, Tellabs, Terawave Communications, TXP Corporation, XAVi Technologies, ZTE Corporation. Corning is providing the optical distribution network components over which the 2488 Mbps/1244 Mbps (downstream/upstream) G-PON systems will be operating.

With PONs, signals are carried by lasers and sent to their destination without the need for active electronics in the outside plant of the telecommunications network. Carriers can realize significant savings with fiber sharing in the local loop, equipment sharing in the Central Office and by eliminating the dependence on expensive active network elements.

ITU-T Recommendations in the G.984 series detail gigabit PONs (G-PON), the latest generation of PON technology. Increasing capacity to gigabit levels should more than satisfy foreseeable customer demands, offering video applications, high-speed Internet access, multimedia and other high-bandwidth capabilities. G-PON maintains the same optical distribution network, wavelength plan and full-service network design principles of broadband PONs (B-PON) defined in ITU-T Rec G.983. As well as allowing for increased network capacity, the new standard offers more efficient IP and Ethernet handling.

Friday, May 18, 2007 3:18:22 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, May 15, 2007

ITU and the IEEE will hold a workshop on carrier-class Ethernet, 31 May - 1 June.Much work has been done in both organisations to progress Ethernet, developed as an enterprise technology, into a carrier service. The event will focus on opportunities for further collaboration. Long-recognized as the ubiquitous LAN technology, Ethernet is now seeing increased attention as a carrier-grade service. In part this is due to the convenience of being able to simply provide end-to-end service, but also carriers can realize savings both in terms of capital and operational expenditure.

Ethernet services are becoming popular because they allow carriers to offer considerably improved flexibility to customers through a much simpler and lower cost interface. Ethernet allows users to specify exactly how much bandwidth they want between the 10Mbit/s and 1Gbit/s range currently offered. Further, Ethernet provides reduced operation complexity and improved scalability for carriers. And as operators look to NGN and the use of the Internet Protocol (IP), Ethernet is seen as the best fit, especially given the rise of such services as IP VPNs, VLANs and dedicated Internet access.

The event will start with an overview of the standards work from ITU-T and IEEE and will then drill down into detail with sessions focusing on: Ethernet based and Ethernet capable access networks; Ethernet network transport; Ethernet Bridging architecture; Ethernet OAM and management; Ethernet QoS, timing and synchronization. A closing session will bring together reports from all of the session chairs in order to identify the direction of future work.

Tuesday, May 15, 2007 2:05:49 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, April 02, 2007

Meeting of Study Group 15 - Optical and other transport network infrastructures

Geneva, 4-15 June 2007

Registration Form

See TSB Collective-letter 4/15 for more information.

Study Group 15 Home

Monday, April 02, 2007 3:18:37 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, February 05, 2007

ITU and the IEEE will hold a workshop on carrier-class Ethernet, 31 May- 1 June.

Much work has been done in both organisations to progress Ethernet, developed as an enterprise technology, into a carrier service. The event will focus on opportunities for further collaboration.

Long-recognized as the ubiquitous LAN technology, Ethernet is now seeing increased attention as a carrier-grade service. In part this is due to the convenience of being able to simply provide end-to-end service, but also carriers can realize savings both in terms of capital and operational expenditure.

Ethernet services are becoming popular because they allow carriers to offer considerably improved flexibility to customers through a much simpler and lower cost interface. Ethernet allows users to specify exactly how much bandwidth they want between the 10Mbit/s and 1Gbit/s range currently offered. Further, Ethernet provides reduced operation complexity and improved scalability for carriers. And as operators look to NGN and the use of the Internet Protocol (IP), Ethernet is seen as the best fit, especially given the rise of such services as IP VPNs, VLANs and dedicated Internet access.

The event will start with an overview of the standards work from ITU-T and IEEE and will then drill down into detail with sessions focusing on: Ethernet based and Ethernet capable access networks; Ethernet network transport; Ethernet Bridging architecture; Ethernet OAM and management; Ethernet QoS, timing and synchronization. A closing session will bring together reports from all of the session chairs in order to identify the direction of future work.

Monday, February 05, 2007 1:02:41 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, January 25, 2007

Lightwave Europe has recently published an article on ITU-T Rec. G.655. The standard extends the use of fibre previously used mainly in core networks to metropolitan or regional networks. Crucially it also has the potential to greatly reduce operating costs for network providers.

See Lightwave’s story here.

See ITU-T Newslog entry here.

 

Thursday, January 25, 2007 3:59:46 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, December 19, 2006

Next meeting of TSAG - Telecommunication Standardization Advisory Group (including meeting of the Seminar Coordination Committee (SCC))
 
Geneva, 26 February - 1 March 2007

Registration Form

See TSB Collective-letter 4/TSAG for more information.

TSAG Home

Tuesday, December 19, 2006 9:04:02 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, November 24, 2006

ITU-T’s Study Group 15 has consented on a revision to a home networking specification that increases data rates over existing home wiring to 320 Megabits per second.

The original standard (ITU-T Recommendation G.9954) is based on input from the HomePNA alliance. The revision adds home networking over existing coax cables to networking over phone wires. The revision also includes new operating spectrums adding VDSL coexistence to the ADSL, POTS and broadcast TV channel spectrum coexistence provided by the original standard.

G.9954 facilitates interoperability and convergence of all networked IP data in the home by creating open, interoperable standards and best practices for a universal home networking market. Telephone service providers have collaborated with residential gateway, set-top box, bridge, consumer electronics (CE) equipment, and ONT manufacturers, as well as their component providers, to meet consumer demand for bundled multimedia home networking.

Home networking bandwidth requirements will steadily increase as operators deliver multi-stream high-definition content, upgrade last-mile access network technologies, and provision future IP-based services. Leveraging existing home wires, service providers can reduce installation, operational expenses and even end-user costs. Experts say that 320 Mbps can accommodate the future bandwidth requirements of service providers as they enhance their offerings with additional features and capabilities.

 

Friday, November 24, 2006 11:10:49 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, November 14, 2006
 Monday, November 13, 2006
A major step towards dynamic and reconfigurable ‘smart’ networks has been made with the consent of a new standard.

Operators and manufacturers have pushed the development of the ITU-T Recommendation (G.667) that is the first for adaptive chromatic dispersion compensators.

Chromatic dispersion is a phenomenon that produces pulse broadening in optical fibers, and can limit the overall amount of data transported over them.  In some applications, the chromatic dispersion of the optical path varies with time or optical network re-configuration to such an extent that, to avoid signal degradations at the receiver, an adaptive dispersion compensator is used to dynamically compensate the chromatic dispersion change of the optical link.

The automatic management of chromatic dispersion of the optical path, previously not standardized, means that for operators it will be much simpler to change the path of an optical channel in the optical network while maintaining the desired degree of chromatic dispersion. The standard allows for chromatic dispersion compensation to be controlled automatically in real time rather than operators having to manually change physical devices in the network.

The need for chromatic dispersion compensators is increasingly influenced by bit-rate as optical transmission systems are being upgraded from 10 to 40Gbit/s. Distance is also a factor as optical systems – ultra long-haul - now extend to thousands of kilometers. In such situations the accumulation of chromatic dispersion variation with time or temperature of the optical path can exceed tolerance and therefore adaptive compensation is necessary. Network operation costs and flexibility should be favorably impacted by the ability to have chromatic dispersion compensation achieved automatically within the network. 

Monday, November 13, 2006 3:11:27 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

ITU-T's Study Group 15 has fast tracked a standard that significantly reduces costs for operators rolling out fibre to the home (FTTH). The new Recommendation G.657 "Characteristics of a Bending Loss Insensitive Single Mode Optical Fibres and Cables for the Access Network" gives fiber optic cable similarly flexible characteristics to copper meaning that it can be much more easily deployed in the street, in the building and in the home.

This increased flexibility in a fibre optic cable means that operators can follow tighter corners in buildings, can employ less-skilled labor in deploying the cable and can worry less if cables / fibres are laid with a sharp bend. This all makes installation work more engineer friendly leading also to less re-work. Moreover the closures for fibres can be half the size, important where space is at a premium for example in an apartment building.

The new standard, which allows optical fibres to flex and bend more than the previous standardized types has achieved consent nearly a year earlier than was expected. This has been due to a push by operators planning the introduction of FTTH. Operators are keen that manufacturers around the world immediately start producing fibres according to the specification with clear advantages in terms of flexibility of deployment and cost reduction.

Many telcos have plans to roll out FTTH. The number of FTTH users in Japan exceeded 6 million as of mid 2006. According to experts the impetus for the work came from Japan, followed by the USA, but there is now much interest from European operators.

 

Monday, November 13, 2006 10:21:17 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, November 07, 2006

A new tool that will give a unique overview of ITU-T’s next generation network (NGN) work has gone live. The NGN Project Management Tool, was developed with the support of a voluntary contribution from Siemens.

Since the work towards standards for NGN is taking place across a number of different ITU-T study groups and other standards development organizations (SDOs) the ability to coordinate and view all NGN work in one place will be invaluable to the swift and efficient publication of NGN specifications.

Essentially a repository of information from ITU and other SDOs, the system was asked for by members of the various Study Groups working on NGN. Key will be the ability to keep track of the latest versions of Recommendations and provide detailed information for experts and summaries for management.

Tuesday, November 07, 2006 9:25:52 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

John MacDonald, a member of the ITU team that created the new VDSL 2 standard, will take part in an upcoming Webinar on this topic, Tuesday, November 21. The Webinar, the second on the topic that ITU has contributed to, will outline what VDSL2 is, which are its competitive differentiators and benefits, and how it allows service providers to compete with cable and satellite operators - by enabling the delivery of enhanced voice, video and data services over a standard copper telephone cable.

ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) is a product of ITU-T, ITU’s standardization arm, and is the world's most widely deployed broadband access technology. It has enhanced users' experience of the Internet, provided access to digitized content, and fuelled the delivery of streaming video and the development of online gaming by offering downstream data rates of up to 8 Mbit/s. Today, service providers must ensure their DSL offerings can compete against other market options from cable operators. One way to do so, is by offering services over VDSL2 (ITU-T Recommendation G.993.2) - very high-speed DSL - a new version of DSL, which gives service providers the ability to deliver even higher bandwidth and more enhanced services to consumer and business customers.

Delivering up to 100 Mbit/s both up and downstream, a tenfold increase over ADSL (Asymmetric DSL) VDSL2 provides for so-called fiber-extension, bringing fiber-like bandwidth to premises not directly connected to the fiber optic segment of a telecom company’s network. By deploying VDSL2 operators expect to be able to offer services such as high-definition TV (HDTV), video-on-demand, videoconferencing, high-speed Internet access, and advanced voice services. Importantly VDSL 2 offers carriers a solution that is interoperable with the DSL equipment many already have in place. In addition, VDSL 2 will work with both legacy ATM networks and next generation IP-based networks.

Register to take part in this online event here

 

Tuesday, November 07, 2006 9:16:51 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 31, 2006

Telecom World, December 4-8, Kong Kong will see ITU-T members, and guests stage an interoperability showcase for fibre to the premises (FTTP) related standards.

 

On show will be gigabit passive optical network (G-PON) equipment built according to the ITU-T G.984 Recommendation. PON technology is used in the local loop to connect residential and SME end users premises in an all-fibre network.

 

The G-PON Pavilion features live demonstrations of G-PON equipment interoperability; with interoperability being a critical enabler to reducing G-PON equipment costs. Triple-play interoperability demonstrations are provided by the following device and equipment manufactures: AMCC, Cambridge Industries Group, Ericsson, FlexLight Networks, Fujitsu Network Communications, Hitachi, LS Cable, Mitsubishi Electric, NEC, Terawave Communications, and ZTE.

 

With PONs, signals are carried by lasers and sent to their destination without the need for active electronics. Carriers can realize significant savings with fiber sharing in the distribution network, equipment sharing in the Central Office and by eliminating the dependence on expensive active network elements. 

 

ITU-T Recommendations in the G.984 series detail gigabit PONs (G-PON), the latest generation of PON technology. Increasing capacity to gigabit levels should more than satisfy foreseeable customer demands, offering video applications, high-speed Internet access, multimedia and other high-bandwidth capabilities. G-PON maintains the same optical distribution network, wavelength plan and full-service network design principles of broadband PONs (B-PON) defined in ITU-T Rec G.983. As well as allowing for increased network capacity, the new standard offers more efficient IP and Ethernet handling.

Tuesday, October 31, 2006 3:58:42 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, September 18, 2006

Introduction

ITU-T is hosting a workshop NGN and Grids in collaboration with the Open Grid Forum (OGF) in Geneva, 23-24 October 2006.

ITU-T’s Global Standards Initiative on Next Generation Network (NGN-GSI) is well under way and is responding to urgent market needs for global NGN standards. NGN offers increased quality and service features for users, independent of the underlying transport technology.

Grids have been widely used in the scientific community. Increasingly, Grids are being deployed within commercial settings. The Open Grid Forum is actively reaching out to communities such as the Telco community to advance Grid adoption, interoperability and scalability. Different scenarios for Telcos can be envisioned: Telcos may 1) specialize in network SLAs that are optimally suited to Grids; 2) use Grids for their IT internal needs; and/or 3) offer Grids as a managed service to customers.

Objectives

  • The joint ITU-T/OGF workshop will bring together the telecoms industry and the Grid community to:
  • Review the present status of applications, services and business opportunities in Grid networks and NGNs.
  • Discuss future evolution for Grids and NGNs both in terms of business opportunities and related technical requirements.
  • Identify relevant existing international standards as well as gaps in the standardization framework for Grids and NGNs.
  • Understand what additional features required by Grids should be considered in ITU-T’s NGN Release 2.
  • Identify the impact of NGN on Grids.
  • Contribute to the establishment of a roadmap for future standardization activities among major players.
  • Prepare a coordinated action plan on urgent standardization issues between standards developing organizations and fora/consortia working in this area.

More details

ITU-T Workshops and Seminars 

Monday, September 18, 2006 2:15:54 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, September 13, 2006

Interoperability between equipment using the ITU-T Recommendation G.984 for passive optical network (G-PON) has been demonstrated at an independent test laboratory, KTL in Santa Clara, California.

PON technology is used in the local loop to connect residential and SME end users premises in an all-fibre network. The event organized by the Full Service Access Network (FSAN) Group demonstrated service level interoperability between several vendors.

ITU-T Recommendation G.984 enables line rates of 2.5 Gbps in the downstream (central office to customer) and 1.2 Gbps in the upstream (customer to central office) to handle the bandwidth requirements for services like HD IPTV, online-gaming, Ethernet services, VoIP and TDM over fibre. In addition it offers more efficient IP and Ethernet handling.

FSAN together with ITU have hosted a series of B-PON and G-PON interoperability events over the years. The recent event, involved voice, data and IPTV testing between the following system vendors: Calix, Cambridge Industries Group, Entrisphere, Fujitsu, Hitachi, Huawei, Iamba Networks, Mitsubishi Electric, NEC, Siemens, Terawave. Shenick provided IPTV and data testing with quality of experience (QoE) and performance assessment. Spirent provided its triple play test solution to verify voice, video, and data service performance and functionality with 'real world' scenarios. Corning provided the complete optical distribution network (ODN) for the event, including the optical fibre, cable, splitters, cabinet, terminal distribution system, and connectorized drop cables.

The multi-vendor G-PON systems were used to transport voice, data and IPTV between the optical networking terminals (ONTs) and the optical line terminals (OLTs). Service provisioning of triple-play services was done via the ONT management and control interface (OMCI). Detailed test cases where used to verify quality and performance of services in a multi-vendor environment.

"We are very pleased with the achievement of VoIP and IPTV as well as other services working across a mix of vendor equipment," said Michael Brusca, Verizon Communications, Chair FSAN Interoperability Task Group. "We have overcome the challenge of OMCI interoperability that built on our previous physical layer testing, within a year after specifying its enhancements. G-PON is now mature and ready for mass deployment."

Don Clarke, 21CN chief access designer for BT Wholesale: "We are actively supporting FSAN and the ITU-T in their endeavor to achieve interoperability for GPON equipment. Interoperability will help drive down costs and leverage innovation in the customer termination space."

A public G-PON Interop Showcase is planned for ITU TELECOM WORLD 2006 this December in Hong Kong.

Wednesday, September 13, 2006 9:42:06 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, June 19, 2006

AAP Announcement UPDATE NOTIFICATION

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2006-06-15

Group : aap
updated :          2006-06-15 17:32:22      
title :          [038] AAP Announcement No. 38, 16 June 2006, (SG 4, 12, 15, 16, 17)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/038.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

More on AAP

Monday, June 19, 2006 9:09:26 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, June 05, 2006

As part of celebrations for the 50th anniversary of ITU-T, you are invited to vote for the most influential standards work from ITU-T.

ITU work is behind many of the worlds most prevalent information and communications technologies. Choose here from our shortlist which you think has best shaped the ICT world of today, or feel free to suggest your own idea.

 

 

Monday, June 05, 2006 8:05:08 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, June 02, 2006

ITU-T is hosting a workshop NGN and Grids in collaboration with the Global Grid Forum (GGF) in Geneva, 23-24 October 2006.

ITU-T’s Global Standards Initiative on Next Generation Network (NGN-GSI) is well under way and is responding to urgent market needs for global NGN standards. NGN offers increased quality and service features for users, independent of the underlying transport technology.

Grids have been widely used in the scientific community. Increasingly, Grids are being deployed within commercial settings. The Global Grid Forum is actively reaching out to communities such as the Telco community to advance Grid adoption, interoperability and scalability. Different scenarios for Telcos can be envisioned: Telcos may 1) specialize in network SLAs that are optimally suited to Grids; 2) use Grids for their IT internal needs; and/or 3) offer Grids as a managed service to customers.

More information

Friday, June 02, 2006 9:58:43 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, June 01, 2006

AAP Announcement UPDATE NOTIFICATION

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2006-05-31

Group : aap
updated :          2006-05-31 17:44:26      
title :          [037] AAP Announcement No. 37, 1 June 2006, (SG 2, 5, 13, 15, 16)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/037.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

More on AAP 

Thursday, June 01, 2006 8:15:08 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, May 23, 2006

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2006-05-16

Group : aap
updated :          2006-05-16      
title :          [036] AAP Announcement No. 36, 16 May 2006, (SG 15, 16, 17)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/036.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

Tuesday, May 23, 2006 1:46:58 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, May 01, 2006

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2006-04-28

Group : aap
updated :          2006-04-28 19:05:29      
title :          [035] AAP Announcement No. 35, 1 May 2006, (SG 13, 15, 16)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/035.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

More on AAP

Monday, May 01, 2006 8:57:24 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, April 04, 2006

AAP Announcement UPDATE NOTIFICATION

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2006-03-31

Group : aap
updated :          2006-03-31 17:53:21      
title :          [033] AAP Announcement No. 033, 1 April 2006, (SG 4, 13, 15, 17)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/033.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

More on AAP 

Tuesday, April 04, 2006 8:27:35 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, March 20, 2006

John McDonald, a member of the ITU team that created the new VDSL 2 standard, will take part in an upcoming Webinar on this topic, Monday, April 03. The Webinar hosted by Light Reading will look at this development and explore the significance and implications of the new standard for both operators and the enormous installed base of DSL subscribers.

ITU’s new VDSL 2 (Very High-Speed DSL 2) standard (ITU-T Recommendation G.993.2) delivers up to 100 Mbit/s both up and downstream, a tenfold increase over ADSL (Asymmetric DSL). By doing so, it provides for so-called fiber-extension, bringing fiber-like bandwidth to premises not directly connected to the fiber optic segment of a telecom company’s network.

VDSL 2 will allow operators to compete with cable and satellite providers by offering services such as high-definition TV (HDTV), video-on-demand, videoconferencing, high-speed Internet access, and advanced voice services, over a standard copper telephone cable.

As well as addressing fast-growing consumer demand for high-speed multimedia services, VDSL 2 offers carriers a solution that is interoperable with the DSL equipment many already have in place, expediting migration of customers to new VDSL 2-based products. In addition, VDSL 2 will work with both legacy ATM networks and next generation IP-based networks.

Register to take part in this online event here.

Monday, March 20, 2006 10:27:08 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, March 03, 2006

Study Group 15 saw continued progress in its work on standards to support the end-to-end rollout of Ethernet and Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS). This work continues the evolution of the use of Ethernet as an enterprise technology into a carrier service, and supports MPLS from a wider network perspective.

Study group experts say that ITU is the only standards body looking to support the choice of either Ethernet or MPLS as an end-to-end network technology. In effect ITU is addressing both technologies as part of one packet transport network, focusing in addition on their seamless interoperability.

Work in the Ethernet field progressed at the February meeting aims to allow per user, service provider, and network operator service level monitoring and assurance; fault isolation to target maintenance and repair and to enable automatic protection switching, network management and the possibility of reuse of SDH management systems.

This work is based on, and enabled by the work recently completed on Ethernet operations, administration and maintenance (OAM) in Study Group 13 with their consent of new Recommendation Y.1731 (see story). The follow-on work in SG 15 includes amendments to the layer network architecture (G.8010/Y.1306) and the Ethernet equipment Recommendations (G.8021/Y.1341), and a new Recommendation on Ethernet protection switching (G.8031/Y.1342), which according to Study Group experts will give operators the opportunity to offer close to 100 per cent availability of Ethernet services for the first time. This is achieved using a system that uses a predefined alternative route if the most direct is broken.

In the field of MPLS a raft of new work aims to allow operators to adopt this technology end-to-end. MPLS is widely embraced in backbone networks as a way to speed up routers. Lately some have advocated its use further downstream in access networks, there have even been suggestions to extend this as far as customer premises. ITU’s work seeks to support this, but additionally to allow the seamless interworking between Ethernet and MPLS. This has been progressed in SG 15 through the completion of a new set of Recommendations for Transport MPLS (T-MPLS), a technology which uses a subset of the components defined in the MPLS Layer Network Architecture of Recommendation G.8110 to support packet transport applications that adhere to ITU-T layer network architecture principles. A T-MPLS layer network can operate independently of its clients and its associated control networks (i.e., multi-carrier or single carrier networks (MCN, SCN) and can carry a variety of client traffic types. This independence affords network operators the freedom necessary to design robust packet transport networks for their own use and to transport customer traffic. T-MPLS is designed to behave consistently with existing transport technologies, thus offering the operational characteristics, performance and reliability that network operators require from carrier-class technologies. The new Recommendations for this technology cover the T-MPLS layer network architecture (G.8110.1/Y.1370.1), interfaces for the T-MPLS Hierarchy (G.8112/Y.1371), and T-MPLS Equipment (G.8121/Y.1381).

 

Friday, March 03, 2006 12:21:50 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, March 01, 2006

AAP Announcement UPDATE NOTIFICATION

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2006-02-28

Group : aap
updated :          2006-02-28 17:39:29      
title :          [031] AAP Announcement No. 31, 1 March 2006, (SG 4, 12, 13, 15)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/031.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

More on AAP 

Wednesday, March 01, 2006 10:02:13 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, February 27, 2006

A revision to a commonly used ITU-T Recommendation will extend use of fibre previously used mainly in core networks to metropolitan or regional networks. Crucially it also has the potential to greatly reduce operating costs for network providers.

G.655 for non-zero dispersion-shifted fibre (NZDSF) was originally designed to support DWDM long distance core, it was designed to reduce a phenomenon called four wave mixing (an interaction between wavelengths that generates additional optical channels). The impressive improvement in dispersion profiles afforded by G.655 fibre together with the development of the G.692 standard for optical interfaces for multichannel systems with optical amplifiers led to an explosion in the market for DWDM systems experts say.

Reduced dispersion allows sending signals over greater distances without dispersion compensation, meaning that operators will be able to avoid using a compensator and amplifier as well as the costs associated with this; power, protection, housing and security.

The revision to G.655 (full title, Characteristics of a non-zero dispersion-shifted single-mode optical fibre and cable) deals with chromatic dispersion, a phenomenon which at low levels counteracts distortion, but at high-levels can make a signal unusable. The management of chromatic dispersion is crucial as the number of wavelengths used in WDM systems increases. ITU has a history of providing the specifications that allow operators to most efficiently handle this. The revision allows more efficient use of the properties of chromatic dispersion by more stringently defining its existence. It defines chromatic dispersion in two new categories that can be exploited by systems designers as necessary.

The need for the work stemmed from systems' designers want to better understand dispersion. And a result is that experts saw a use for G.655 cable in metro or regional networks where it had previously only been used in core networks.

 

Monday, February 27, 2006 5:16:39 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, February 23, 2006
A new Recommendation identifies the needs required to give end-to-end visibility of client services carried across multi-carrier networks. Without this ability carriers have often had to wait for customers to report problems before they can begin to address them.

The Recommendation - G.8601 - identifies the requirements for the next stage of work which will focus on methodologies to address this issue. Study group experts report that contributions to this end have already
been received.

G.8601 defines architectural requirements for the edge-to-edge management of client services transported over various transport network topologies and technologies. The services for which such management capabilities are required are also included.

The requirements for the transference of the management data between the edge points are described along with the requirements for accessibility to management information at some point in the network, other than the end point.

Thursday, February 23, 2006 8:19:05 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, February 20, 2006

G.959.1, the Recommendation that increased the capacity for multi-vendor optical interfaces developed to exploit the demand for high capacity Internet routers (see press release), has been updated to help further reduce costs for operators. The use of forward error correction (FEC) as defined in ITU-T Rec. G.709 will allow operators to transport data more cost-effectively through the use of lower cost electro-optics.

 

FEC is a method of sending redundant information with the data in one-way communication in order to allow the receiver to reconstruct the data if there was an error in transmission.

 

Experts say that in the last few years they have seen a shift in demand from operators who are now looking to maximize return on investment rather than increase distance covered etc. The revision of this Recommendation addresses this need. 

 

This work forms part of ITU’s ongoing work in optical transport networks (OTN) which encourages a fair market for manufacturers and operators, and ultimately encourages better service for consumers. It has been developed with input from the Optical Interworking Forum (OIF).

 

Monday, February 20, 2006 9:44:25 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

ITU-T will publish the first ITU-T Recommendation in the area of free-space optics. FSO is an area dominated by proprietary solutions, the new Rec means that users of FSO systems will be able to co-locate FSO solutions provided by different manufacturers for the first time.

FSO systems use lasers or LEDs to transmit data between two points with line of sight up to 2km. Typically this means between the top of buildings. Data rates of up to 1.25 Gbps are available.

As well as use in fixed settings like between tall office buildings. FSO systems have proven useful in disaster relief where telecoms infrastructure has been damaged and a quick fix is necessary. Equally FSO systems are used where there is no existing infrastructure as a way of avoiding disruptive and expensive cable laying. They are spectrum license free and protocol independent so will happily carry Ethernet, SDH signals etc.

The ITU-T Rec. G.640 will allow the co-location of FSO systems without interference with each other. 

Monday, February 20, 2006 9:10:23 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, February 17, 2006

Study Group 15 has consented a Recommendation that will address a key concern in the evolution to next generation networks (NGN).

With the proposed move to packet switched networks, carriers, mobile operators and system integrators all have a need to support time-division multiplexing (TDM) over packet networks. TDM, experts say, today forms all of the transmission network and a good part of the access network.

The role of this Rec - G.8261 - is to outline the requirements for the support of a crucial part of TDM's operation in packet networks. The Recommendation's authors say that without proper synchronization, applications such as mobile telephony simply will not work.

G.8261 analyses synchronization aspects in packet networks, with particular focus on the Ethernet, and outlines the minimum requirements for the synchronization function of network elements. In particular it focuses on the transport of synchronization information required for the transport of TDM signals over packet networks. The transport of SDH signals is for further study.

Friday, February 17, 2006 2:42:51 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, February 03, 2006

With the agreement of the TSAG meeting 14-18 March 2005, a Joint Coordination Activity on Home Networking (JCA-HN) was established. Mr. Andrew Nunn (BT, UK) was appointed as the Convenor of this activity.

The scope of the JCA-HN was decided following a meeting held immediately after the ITU-T workshop Opportunities and Challenges in Home Networking, 13 – 14 October 2005, Geneva and discussions at the TSAG meeting 7-11 November 2005. The name “Home Network Initiative” will be used to describe work in this field spanning ITU-T Study Groups.

JCA-HN will:

  • Co-ordinate the Home Network Initiative activity across all the relevant ITU-T Study Groups (e.g. currently ITU-T SGs 4, 5, 6, 9, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17) and liaise with relevant ITU-R SGs (currently, SGs 1 and 6).
  • Seek cooperation from external bodies working in the field and disseminate information received from these bodies to the relevant ITU-T Study Groups.
  • Identify what should be standardized by ITU-T
  • Prepare a roadmap for this standardization activity

More on JCA-HN

Friday, February 03, 2006 5:42:16 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, January 27, 2006

If you missed the recent ITU-T webinar on NGN you may be interested to know that the whole thing including slides, audio and the question and answer session is available in Light Reading’s archive.

Nearly 400 people attended the live event on 23 January, submitting close to 100 questions to the speakers.

Friday, January 27, 2006 10:27:45 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, January 19, 2006

ITU’s Strategy and Policy Unit (SPU) is hosting a workshop 23-24 March in Geneva focusing on the policy and regulatory challenges related to the deployment of IP-enabled NGNs. The draft workshop concept document gives additional details on the objectives of the workshop.

Thursday, January 19, 2006 9:26:42 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, January 16, 2006

AAP Announcement UPDATE NOTIFICATION

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2006-01-13

Group : aap
updated :          2006-01-13 18:42:24      
title :          [028] AAP Announcement No. 28, 16 January 2006, (SG 2, 4, 5, 13, 15, 17)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/028.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

More on AAP

 

Monday, January 16, 2006 9:59:53 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, December 23, 2005

The ITU’s work on standards for next generation networks (NGNs) promises to have a fundamental impact on tomorrow’s telecom services – by opening hardware and software markets to competition, driving down costs, encouraging innovation, and laying the foundation for the next phase of convergence.

You are invited to find out more about the latest release of the ITU’s NGN standards and their likely impact on the telecom supply chain in a free one-hour-long online seminar, hosted by Light Reading and featuring key players in ITU’s work on NGN on Monday, January 23. 

The event is being held by Light Reading in collaboration with the ITU.  Speakers will be:

  • Keith Dickerson, Representative of the ITU NGN-Global Standards Initiative (GSI)
  • Marco Carugi, Representative of the ITU NGN- GSI
  • Monique Morrow, Representative of the ITU NGN- GSI

The speakers will explain the context of the latest NGN standards and then drill down on some of the key aspects of them, explaining  their importance and likely impact on telecom equipment and service markets.

The Light Reading “SuperWebinar” will comprise a short introduction by Peter Heywood,  Founding Editor of Light Reading, followed by a 45 minute slide presentation given by all three speakers.  There will be a 10-15 minutes Q&A session at the end.

The live event will be staged on Monday, January 23rd at 5:30 PM Central European Time,  4:30 PM London time, 11:30 AM New York time, and 8:30 AM Pacific time. 

To register please click on this link.
Friday, December 23, 2005 4:00:44 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, December 22, 2005

An ITU-T workshop - NGN and its Transport Networks - will take place at the International Conference Center Kobe (ICCK), Japan, 20 to 21 April 2006.

NGN Standardization work is now well underway in the ITU-T and other SDOs. Following the success of the NGN Focus Group and the establishment of the NGN Global Standards Initiative (NGN-GSI) in ITU-T, this ITU-T workshop will be an opportunity to review the status of the work, identify technology trends, and provide a framework for moving forward standardization work.

This event will provide an overview of the architecture, performance and transport aspects of NGN as well as the market drivers and challenges. Particular emphasis will be given to network technologies, standards that address architecture and the performance aspects of NGN and transport networks aspects to support NGN services. More.

Thursday, December 22, 2005 2:11:08 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

ITU-T together with the US Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions (ATIS) will hold a workshop, Next Generation Network Technology and Standardization at the Mandalay Bay Convention Centre in Las Vegas, USA, from 19 to 20 March 2006. This workshop will be held during the TelecomNEXT event.

NGN Standardization work is now well underway in the ITU-T, ATIS and other SDOs. Following the success of the ITU-T’s Focus Group on NGN (FGNGN), the establishment of the NGN Global Standards Initiative (NGN-GSI) in ITU-T and the activities within the ATIS NGN Focus Group and Technical committees, this free workshop will be an opportunity to review the status of the work, identify technology trends, and seek to identify areas where the ITU-T and ATIS together with regional experts can further coordinate their standardization work.

ATIS has kindly negotiated registration rates for workshop participants who are also interested in attending TelecomNEXT. For details please see http://www.techthink.org/registration.html

More.

Thursday, December 22, 2005 2:10:02 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

With the next phase of ITU-T's work on next generation networks (NGN) underway a new webpage as been unveiled giving access to a variety of NGN resources.

The new page will act as a portal for those people participating in NGN study but also to those new to NGN. Features include a live news feed, a short introduction to NGN, links to official documents, the Release 1 set of NGN specifications, presentations and important dates for your calendar.  

An upcoming feature will be an NGN Roadmap, that will provide an overview of the NGN work going on across the standardization world. Essentially, it will act as a repository of NGN information from ITU and other SDOs. A key feature of the tool will be the ability to track work progress and see the latest versions of documents.

Thursday, December 22, 2005 2:08:00 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
NGN-GSI will build on the successful completion by the Focus Group on NGN (FG NGN) of its Release 1 deliverables. NGN-GSI will focus on developing the detailed standards necessary for NGN deployment to give service providers the means to offer the wide range of services expected in NGN. NGN-GSI will harmonize, in collaboration with other bodies, different approaches to NGN architecture worldwide.

More on NGN-GSI

Thursday, December 22, 2005 11:07:30 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, December 16, 2005

AAP Announcement UPDATE NOTIFICATION

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2005-12-16

Group : aap
updated :          2005-12-16 16:22:28      
title :          [027Corr1] Corrigendum 1 to AAP Announcement No. 27, 16 December 2005, (SG 4, 9, 15)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/027corr1.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

More on AAP

Friday, December 16, 2005 11:37:46 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, December 15, 2005

AAP Announcement UPDATE NOTIFICATION

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2005-12-15

Group : aap
updated :          2005-12-15 17:57:40      
title :          [027] AAP Announcement No. 027, 16 December 2005, (SG 4, 9, 15)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/027.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

More on AAP 

Thursday, December 15, 2005 11:32:41 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, December 02, 2005

Next meeting of Study Group 15 - Optical and other transport network infrastructures

Geneva, 6-17 February 2006

Registration Form

See TSB Collective-letter 2/15 for more information.

Study Group 15 Home

Friday, December 02, 2005 12:05:25 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, October 31, 2005

A workshop on home networking will move standardization work in the area to a crucial new stage according to participants. The event held by ITU in Geneva 13-14 October followed a similar 2004 ITU-T Study Group 9 Tokyo workshop, and closed with agreement on how to move forward in a number of key areas. Meeting concurrently was the Home Networking-Joint Coordination Activity (HN-JCA), a group of ITU-T experts aiming to coordinate standardization effort on home networking across ITU-T Study Groups.

Home networking is the linking of all types of electronic devices for applications such as entertainment, telecommunication, home automation systems and telemetry (remote control and monitoring systems), see below for the official ITU definition. It has become an increasingly important topic for standardizers, partly because of the disparate nature of the items to be networked and partly because of market pressure. US organization CTAM (Cable and Telecommunications Association for Marketing), estimates that 40 percent of broadband customers want to share audio over the home network and 36 percent want to share video.

One of the key conclusions of the workshop is that there needs to be better collaboration between the various groups involved in the work. Ralph W. Brown, Chief Technology Officer, CableLabs and presenter at the event: “Through better coordination and closer working relationship, we can avoid the proliferation of incompatible standards.” It is critical for ITU to facilitate working relationships and open the door to referencing the specifications of other organizations from international standards it was agreed. To this end, Reinhard Scholl, Deputy to the Director of ITU’s Telecommunication Standardization Bureau gave a presentation highlighting the various ways that ITU can accommodate the work of other bodies. Participants welcomed the degree of flexibility offered by ITU.

One option outlined by Scholl and discussed as a possible next step is the formation of an ITU-T Focus Group to work on some of the technical issues. The Focus Group concept allows urgent standardization needs that are not addressed within existing ITU‑T structure to be addressed quickly and with the minimum of red-tape. Currently a group, the Home Networking-Joint Coordination Activity (HN-JCA), exists to harmonize work going on across ITU-T Study Groups but its mandate does not extend to technical work. More

.

 

Monday, October 31, 2005 9:48:32 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, October 03, 2005

AAP Announcement UPDATE NOTIFICATION

The following files relative to AAP have been updated since 2005-09-30

Group : aap
updated :          2005-09-30 16:36:31      
title :          [022] AAP Announcement No. 22, 1 October 2005 (SG 15, 16, 19)
url :          http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/aap/announce/05-08/022.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Note : This is an automatic message for ITU-T/TSB Alternative Approval Process

 - For further questions, please contact TSB EDH at tsbedh@itu.int
 - For documentation, go to http://www.itu.int/ITU-T/aap/index.html 
 - Comments on Recommendations under AAP should be submitted by filling the appropriate forms in each Study Group AAP web page and sent to the relevant Study Group email address

More on AAP

Monday, October 03, 2005 10:27:58 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, September 13, 2005

Home Networking, the linking of all types of electronic devices for applications such as entertainment, telecommunication, home automation systems and telemetry (remote control and monitoring systems), is attracting a great deal of interest. And given the wide range of previously unrelated technologies involved, standards that allow for interoperability are seen as key to the successful marketing of the concept. However, thus far, despite many initiatives, a lack of standardization has stifled the market. And, many believe that for the new technology to take-off, a consolidation of the various standardization efforts is necessary.

This workshop will bring together experts from all over the world who are pushing forward the frontiers of this fast moving field. It will provide an overview of the technology as well as an examination of standards that address access, services, performance, quality of service (QoS), electromagnetic interference and security issues. The workshop will deal with current technology and future trends to provide a framework for moving forward standardization work.

More details.


Tuesday, September 13, 2005 9:27:20 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, June 03, 2005

A meeting of Study Group 15, the ITU-T group responsible for studies into optical and other transport network technologies, saw consent on a new Recommendation that defines the way for equipment providers to produce systems for Ethernet virtual private line (EVPL) services.

EVPLs offer a way for operators to provide point-to-point connections for carrying data over shared-bandwidth facilities.

The announcement is in line with the current industry trend to offer Ethernet services, and further signals Ethernet's growth in popularity as an enterprise telecom service.

Long-recognized as a ubiquitous LAN technology, Ethernet is now seeing increased attention as a carrier-grade service. In part this is due to the convenience of being able to simply provide end-to-end service, but also carriers can realize savings both in terms of capital and operational expenditure.

In terms of capital expenditure, Ethernet is easy and cost-effective to provision in the network. In terms of operational expenditure, carriers can deploy a single physical connection to the end user, but adapt its data-carrying capacity as end-user requirements dictate over time. This flexibility means a significant saving for the operator and the customer.

This work follows earlier work in the area of Ethernet standards approved last year. See also press release 8 June, 2004.

The new Recommendation - G.8011.2 - defines the service attributes and parameters for carrying Ethernet characteristic information over shared-bandwidth, point-to-point connections, provided by SDH, ATM, MPLS, PDH, OTH, or ETY server layer networks.

 

Friday, June 03, 2005 8:10:54 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, June 01, 2005
ITU-T's Study Group 15 has agreed on design guidelines for optical fibre submarine cable systems.

Submarine cable systems form a very important part of the world's ICT network infrastructure with cables linking all the world's continents except Antarctica. And as demand for increased transmission capacity increases, owners of these networks are keen to optimize their investments, because laying new submarine cables is an expensive and difficult business.

The guidelines appear in a supplement to ITU-T Recommendations on the topic of submarine cable systems (Supplement 41, to the G series of ITU-T Recommendations), and allow for the incorporation of traditional technology (e.g. WDM systems, erbium doped fibre amplifiers) as well as new technology including new generation forward error correction (FEC) and Raman amplifiers.

According to the expert authors, the document has been produced with a key objective to detail the main technical issues to be taken into account in order to achieve a link's longest distance, with maximum reliability.

The supplement describes considerations for repeatered, repeaterless and optically amplified systems supporting synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH) and optical transport network (OTN) signals. Repeaterless submarine cable systems are used for terrestrial network extensions in cases where submarine distances up to about 350 km are to be covered. Repeatered submarine systems are used for long haul, large capacity transmission by using submerged optical amplifiers in order to cross distances up to transoceanic lengths.

Wednesday, June 01, 2005 10:39:33 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, May 27, 2005
A new ITU-T Recommendation specifies the characteristics for devices that address a phenomenon known as polarization mode dispersion (PMD) in optical fibres. PMD is caused by a difference of the propagation speed in different polarisations of the light travelling through a fibre. PMD is induced by distortion of the light in optical fibres that occur as a result of the manufacturing process, the way it is laid in the ground, around corners etc.

PMD becomes an increasingly serious problem as the bit rate and the length of optical transmission systems increase. As a result, PMD compensation (PMDC) is an important technology for very high rate long distance systems. For instance at 10Gbit/s PMD is manageable for currently existing long-haul dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) systems but at 40Gbit/s compensation may become necessary.

While there has been knowledge of the phenomenon for some time the PMD-induced penalties such as distance and bit rate limitations have often been considered too difficult or expensive to deal with, and so the telecommunication industry has had to learn to live with the problem. There have been limited efforts to develop solutions which have not evolved into successful commercial products.

In order to address the problem in a more efficient manner and stimulate a market for PMD compensating devices, operators have driven this ITU-T work. By agreeing on a set of characteristics for these devices, operators can look forward to the availability of products that will be more mature and will cost less than developing in-house solutions. It is expected that operators may also see reduced expenditure because it is thought that the use this technology will reduce the need for electro-optical regenerators (devices that break a signal down in order to restore it to its original quality).

Future work of the group that has produced this Recommendation will look at similar devices called adaptive dispersion compensators for another phenomenon called chromatic dispersion that also limits data rates and transmission distances in optical fibres.

Friday, May 27, 2005 12:54:31 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
A new standard from ITU-T's Study Group 15 gives network operators the ability to deploy multi-vendor dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM) systems in a metro environment. Defining specifications for interoperability in this field is seen as a ground-breaking achievement, where previously there has been domination by proprietary systems.

WDM technology is used by the owners of optical fibres to maximise their capacity. The technology achieves this by simultaneously operating an optical fibre pair at more than one wavelength. Since operators wish to maximize their cable plant investments and deploy increasingly bandwidth hungry services in a multi-vendor environment, standards development in this field is seen as crucial.

Until now DWDM systems, which have the capability of carrying a high number of channels (up to 80) on a single optical fibre pair, have been deployed in core fibre networks that cover great distances. A different WDM technology CWDM (the C stands for coarse) was the first standardised solution for metropolitan areas, but CWDM systems only have the capability of carrying a limited number of channels (up to 12 now, but in the future 16).

This standard (ITU-T Recommendation G.698.1) has been driven by operators and allows them to benefit from the greater capacity of DWDM systems in metropolitan environments while being able to deploy system elements from multiple vendors. The current version of this Recommendation covers distances in the range of 30 - 80 km.

These new specifications have been made possible by the use of a fundamentally different methodology to that used previously according to the experts who developed it. The so-called 'black-link'-approach is seen as a new direction in the standardization of WDM systems, providing a powerful tool to enable agreement on multi-vendor interoperability in a previously proprietary environment.

Friday, May 27, 2005 12:52:45 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

ITU-T has completed the specifications necessary for telecoms operators around the world to offer a ‘super’ triple play of video, Internet and voice services.

The ITU-T Recommendation for very-high-bit-rate digital subscriber line 2 (VDSL2) will allow operators worldwide to compete with cable and satellite operators by offering services such as high definition TV (HDTV), video-on-demand, videoconferencing, high speed Internet access and advanced voice services including VoIP, over a standard copper telephone cable.

VDSL2 will offer consumers up to 100 Mbps up and downstream, a massive ten-fold increase over the more common ADSL. Essentially it allows so-called ‘fibre-extension’ bringing fibre like bandwidth to premises not directly connected to the fibre-optic segment of a telecoms company’s network.

As well as addressing increasing consumer demands, VDSL2 offers telecom carriers a solution that promises to be interoperable with the ADSL kit that many operators already have in place. This interoperability will make the migration of customers to VDSL2 much simpler. Another important feature of VDSL2 is that it will work in both legacy ATM networks and next generation IP based networks.

VDSL2 is seen by many operators as an ideal accompaniment to a fibre to the premises (FTTP) rollout, where for instance fibre is supplied direct to an apartment block and from there copper cable is used to supply residents with high-speed VDSL2.

Yoichi Maeda, chairman of the Study Group responsible for the work said: “We have leveraged the strengths of ADSL, ADSL2+, and VDSL to achieve the very high performance levels that you will see with VDSL2. It looks set to become an extremely important feature of the telecommunications landscape and is a landmark achievement for our members, many of whom were relying on this Recommendation in order to take their businesses to the next level.”

The publication of standardized specifications in an ITU-T Recommendation (G.993.2) means that operators can avoid being locked into a single vendor. As well as the economic advantages that this may bring it also means that operators can select the best solutions according to their needs.
Friday, May 27, 2005 12:49:03 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, May 16, 2005

Supercomm, June 6-9, Chicago, USA will see ITU-T members, and guests stage an interoperability showcase for fibre to the premises (FTTP) related standards. 

On show will be passive optical network (PON) equipment built according to the ITU-T G.984 and G.983 series of Recommendations. PON technology is used in the local loop to connect residential and SME end users premises in an all-fibre network.

With PONs, signals are carried by lasers and sent to their destination without the need for active electronics. Carriers can realize significant savings with fiber sharing in the distribution network, equipment sharing in the Central Office and by eliminating the dependence on expensive active network elements. 

ITU-T Recommendations in the G.984 series detail gigabit PONs (G-PON), the latest generation of PON technology. Increasing capacity to gigabit levels should more than satisfy foreseeable customer demands, offering video applications, high-speed Internet access, multimedia and other high-bandwidth capabilities. G-PON maintains the same optical distribution network, wavelength plan and full-service network design principles of broadband PONs (B-PON) defined in ITU-T Rec G.983. As well as allowing for increased network capacity, the new standard offers more efficient IP and Ethernet handling.

17 vendors will show B-PON interoperability, products for G-PON, optical distribution network, testing and performance and video service equipment and set-top boxes.

 

Monday, May 16, 2005 4:36:56 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, May 13, 2005

A new international standard from ITU-T looks set to help take home phoneline networking technology into the mainstream.

Home phone networking is a simple way to network devices such as computers, printers, games machines etc. in the home. It uses existing internal - telephone line - infrastructure and so is available to anyone with more than one phone in their home. Data rates up to 128 Mbps (240 Mbps with optional extensions) are achievable with the technology according to the Home Phoneline Networking Alliance (HomePNA) upon whose specifications some of ITU-T's standards are based.

ITU-T Recommendation G.9954 is the latest in a series of ITU-T Recommendations (including G.989.1, G.989.2 and G.989.3) in the area and outlines interoperability and compatibility issues for phoneline networking transceivers. Specifically it gives enhanced physical, media access, and link layer specifications for the devices.

A number of manufacturers are already incorporating ITU-T specifications into their phoneline networking products.

Friday, May 13, 2005 3:30:08 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     |