International Telecommunication Union   ITU
 
 
Site Map Contact us Print Version
 Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Introducing ICT innovations in the elderly care not only contributes to a better life for seniors, but also saves costs on social and healthcare systems. Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS, Joint Research Centre, European Commission) presented the preliminary findings of two case studies of ICT in long-term care from Scotland (UK) and the Limousine Region (France) at the Social Innovation Conference in Brussels in May 2014. The two cases studies are part of the ongoing project called “Long-term care strategies for independent living of elderly people (ICT-AGE)”.

Scottish Telecare Development Programme
The programme addressed the need to reduce healthcare costs of elderly people aged 65+ in 2006-2011. By installing remote emergency systems in elderly homes, the programme achieved €91 million of cost savings and increased the quality of life, safety and independence of more than 43, 000 users. It helped to reduce hospital admissions and stay length, admissions to care homes, and, caring tasks, thereby reducing stress for informal carers and increasing their ability to retain paid employment.

Home Automation and Advanced Telecare
The project in the Limousine region (Creuze, Corrèze and Haute Vienne Departments) in France began in 2010 and focused on preventing falls. Falls are a  major public health problem, costing an estimated €2 billion each year. Sensors, light paths, and alarm systems connected to a Telecare centre aimed to reduce the number of falls, and resulted in reduced hospital admissions, depression of the elderly, and their overall need for care. This programme saved the Corrèze Department an estimated €6.300-7.300 per person a year.

Key Success Factors
Public funding is necessary to support such business models. Nonetheless, other funding sources (user) also contribute to the sustainability of the business model. In addition, political engagement and local stakeholders’ involvement, extensive training to all involved actors and mainstreaming strategies prove to be crucial as well. It is important to run awareness campaigns and promote such projects to drive the development, deployment and adoption of ICT-based services and to inform societies about future solutions in elderly care.

Project website:ICT-AGE

(Source: Careplus)

Wednesday, July 09, 2014 3:34:57 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, March 24, 2014


The Ministry of Information Communication Technology (ICT), Postal and Courier Services is organising the e-TECH AFRICA 2014 EXPO conference and exhibition scheduled for 11 – 14 March 2014 in collaboration with its strategic partners.

The theme for this year is “Promoting Competitiveness and Sustainable Growth Through ICTs”.

The conference will run parallel to the exhibition. The event is expected to bring a wide range of ideas, opinions, perspectives, research findings and expertise to expand knowledge frontiers for sustainable growth and development through ICTs. The event is also expected to draw people from the ICT Industry, civil society, academia and government to a discussion platform for national development. The e-TECH Africa 2014 Conference and exhibitions will provide a platform for creating awareness about the opportunities, challenges and benefits derived from the adoption of ICTs in Africa as well as initiate practical measures needed to extend the ICT reach.

The exhibitions and conference will also explore the enabling role of ICTs in the development of African countries.

Objectives of the conference
The general objective of the e-TECH Africa Conference is to arouse the interest of the Zimbabwean population in the use of ICTs for a successful transformation of Africa from an agricultural society to a knowledge society. In line with the African Regional Action Plan on the Knowledge Economy (ARAPKE), the Conference is expected to:

a. Promote the right of all to have equal access to ICT value added services and to experience the advantages of using technological services
b. Develop, maintain and stimulate people’s curiosity, interest and enjoyment in ICTs
c. Promote the acquisition of appropriate technological skills, concepts, principles, methods and vocabulary
d. Leverage ICTs as a tool for socio- economic development especially in developing countries.
e. Attract more and new investments in the ICT sector
f. Bridge the digital divide.
g. Promote business linkages and partnerships.

The thrust of the conference is therefore to explore how ICTs can accelerate Africa’s developmental agenda and in the process transform Zimbabwe into a knowledge based society.

Conference Agenda
The conference will be characterised by key presentations followed by panel debates that will discuss how ICTs can be exploited to support sustainable economic development. Presentations and panel debates will focus on what can be done to sustain or speed up the developmental pace and close the ICT gap still exists particularly at national level and in Africa. It is therefore expected that key presentations will be made in and around the following areas:

• Building a Knowledge and Information Society
• Research and development in ICT’s
• ICT’s in Health and Agriculture
• ICT’s in Tourism and Entertainment
• Building a vibrant ICT industry
• The need for a well regulated ICT environment
• Bridging the digital divide
• The potential of ICT’s for sustainable growth
• Cyber Security & Cyber Ethics
• ICTs for Poverty Alleviation and Community Development
• Impact of e-Government on National Development
• E-learning for a developing economy
• Green Computing
• Cloud Computing

For more information please visit http://www.etechafrica.co.zw/ or email:  gchingonzo@ictministry.gov.zw or bmhonderwa@ictministry.gov.zw

(Source: TechZim)

Monday, March 24, 2014 5:55:31 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
The winners are iQube Labs, Health Central and Health IT. PHN also gave cash prizes to the three winning teams.

The landmark healthcare hackathon saw teams of tech entrepreneurs participate in the day long hackathon where PHN provided representative healthcare datasets that included facility level, household and programmatic data points for the leading causes of mortality, including malnutrition and malaria.

In addition, locations of primary healthcare centers and referral hospitals in all 36+1 states in the country were unveiled with state level human resource for health data and other socio-economic indicators.

Aliko Dangote, founding patron, PHN, meeting the winner of the healthcare hackathon, iQube Labs, said that “as part of the innovation pillar of the Alliance, we recently launched the Nigeria Health Innovation Marketplace (NHIM), an intervention aimed at providing a convergence platform for identifying and incubating innovative health products, technologies and approaches.

He said this is in a bid to provide market linkages to enable promising health innovations such as iQube Labs achieve scale and impact on the nation’s effort in meeting Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 4, 5 and 6’.

iQube Labs used PHN healthcare datasets to develop an innovative mobile health solution to address supply chain challenges for essential health commodities and incorporated GIS/crowd sourcing layers to potentially estimate alternative routes to support the distribution and management of drugs in crises prone states.

Health Central showcased an integrated predictive service delivery tool while Health IT provided access and info about health infrastructure and human resources for health mapping to empower patients.

Jim Ovia, co-chair of PHN, congratulated the winners, stating that the NHIM comprises 3 core elements: virtual health innovation portal, health innovation hub/incubator and health innovation challenges/hackathons.

During the landmark hackathon, Muntaqa Umar-sadiq, the CEO of the Private Sector Health Alliance, in his remarks, stated that “it is humbling to see an army of computer programmers and tech entrepreneurs develop mobile and ICT solutions that will empower the true heroines of the Saving One Million Lives Movement: the thousands of midwives, female community and village health workers, working in many rural areas across the country to save the lives of women, newborns and children”.

Umar-sadiq said that PHN has engaged different segments of its private sector members to co-develop and unveil innovative partnership projects to contribute to the Saving One Million Lives Movement.

The private sector members, according to him, are telecommunication members, financial institution members, pharma/FMCGs members, healthcare providers, amongst others.

Kelechi Ohiri, the technical lead of the Saving One Million Lives Initiative and special adviser to the minister of health, added that “with access to data and capital, we believe that the tech community can play an important role in creating the enabling environment to accelerate progress in saving at least one million lives by 2015.”

(Source: Business Day News)

Monday, March 24, 2014 5:27:43 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, February 19, 2014


Malawian mothers and guardians of young children who live in villages far from health facilities are heaving a sigh of relief, after the introduction of a hotline through which they can access medical advice. VillageReach, a non-profit NGO, is running a program called “Chipatala Cha Pa Foni“, which means Health Center by Phone.

Malawi has some of the highest mother and child mortality rates in the world. The maternal mortality ratio is at 675 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births, while the under-five mortality rate is 112 deaths per 1,000 births.

The figures are largely attributed to limited availability of timely and reliable health information for women of childbearing age, and a lack of access to health care for villagers due to long distances.

VillageReach officials say the phone program, which is currently run in the districts of Balaka, Mulanje, Nkhota-kota and Ntcheu, aims to bridge this information gap. “This is a toll-free case management hotline, which means people can call free from any Airtel [mobile phone service provider] phone and can ask their questions concerning any health issues", explained Zachariah Jezman, the program manager. "And apart from that component, we have also a reminder and tips service. In addition to that we have protocol approved messages, which are either posted to clients who have personal phone or which can be retrieved by a client without a phone by using any Airtel phone”.

According to Jezman, two complementary services extend the health centers' reach by providing Malawians with access to accurate health information.

He said the clients are handled by hotline workers who are trained personnel in maternal, newborn, and children's health. The workers use a simple touch-screen device that records data electronically for monitoring and evaluation purposes. They are supervised by trained nurses for quality assurance.

Balaka Center hotline nurse supervisor Novice Gauti tells VOA the center receives between 25 and 30 calls each day from mothers and guardians who seek medical advice. Gauti said along with providing crucial help for people in remote villages, Chipatala Cha pa Foni has helped reduce queues in the health facilities.

“Now the queues at the hospitals are very small compared to the time when there was no Chipatala cha pa Foni, because the mothers were just rushing to the hospital with minor problems", she noted. " But now when they have minor problems or discomfort they can easily and comfortably call us from their home and seek medical advice or medical care”.

(Source: Voice of America)

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 10:32:41 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, December 13, 2013

Most people are optimistic about technology innovations advancing healthcare, are willing to participate in virtual healthcare visits with their doctor, and would use health sensors in their bodies and even their toilets, according to a new study commissioned by Intel Corporation.

The "Intel Healthcare Innovation Barometer", conducted across eight countries by Penn Schoen Berland, found the majority of people also believe that technology innovation holds the best promise for curing fatal diseases – more than increasing the number of physicians or additional funding for research.

"This survey indicates very high willingness of people to become part of the solution to the world's healthcare problems with the aid of all sorts of technologies", said Eric Dishman, Intel fellow and general manager of the company's Health and Life Sciences Group. "Most people appear to embrace a future of healthcare that allows them to get care outside hospital walls, lets them anonymously share their information for better outcomes, and personalizes care all the way down to an individual's specific genetic makeup".

Intel's research revealed that what people want most at the intersection of healthcare and technology is more personalized care based on their own behaviors and biology that provides the freedom to get healthcare wherever and whenever it's convenient for them.

Intel Healthcare Innovation Barometer: Key Findings

Improving Personal Care and Self-Monitoring with Technology

- More than 70 percent of people globally are receptive to toilet sensors, prescription bottle sensors or swallowed monitors.
- Sixty-six percent of people say they would prefer a personalized healthcare regimen designed specifically for them based on their genetic profile or biology.
- Fifty-three percent of people say they would trust a test they personally administered as much or more than if performed by a doctor.
- About 30 percent of people would trust themselves to perform their own ultrasound.

Sharing Anonymous Digital Health Records for the Common Good

- People are more willing to anonymously share their health records or genetic information than their banking information or phone records.
- More than three-quarters (76 percent) of respondents over the age of 55 would be willing to anonymously share results of lab tests or health monitoring to contribute to research databases compared with 64 percent of millennials.
- India is the country most willing to share healthcare information to aid innovation.

Emerging Technology Tools for Increased In-Home Health Management

- Half of those surveyed would trust a diagnosis delivered via video conference from their doctor.
- Seventy-two percent are receptive to communication technologies that allow them to remotely connect to their doctor.
- The innovation least likely to be incorporated by the global population is a robot performing surgery.
- Almost half of respondents (43 percent) globally would trust themselves to monitor their own blood pressure and other basic vitals.
- Only 42 percent of Japanese respondents say the traditional hospital will become obsolete in the future compared with 57 percent of global respondents.

Further details

Friday, December 13, 2013 5:05:37 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, November 14, 2013

Partnership supports ITU-WHO goal to combat non-communicable diseases using mobile services

The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) has signed a ground-breaking partnership agreement with international healthcare company Bupa, to collaborate on a global ‘m-Health’ initiative called ‘Be Healthy, Be Mobile’. Bupa and ITU will join forces to provide multidisciplinary expertise, health information and mobile technology to fight chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular and chronic respiratory diseases, in low- and middle-income countries. The programme is led by ITU and the World Health Organization (WHO).

Welcoming the partnership, ITU Secretary-General Hamadoun I. Touré said: “Non-communicable diseases are the single greatest factor contributing to mortality and the overall disease burden in developed countries and emerging economies alike. Where m-Health is concerned, ITU works with WHO to share our long-standing experience and our competence in mobile technologies and healthcare as well as our network of partners. We are truly excited about the potential of this new partnership with Bupa to help us accelerate the adoption of mobile health interventions worldwide”.

Bupa CEO Stuart Fletcher said: “Of the 36 million people who died from chronic disease in 2008, nine million were under the age of 60; and 90 per cent of these premature deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries. m-Health is a cost-effective and accessible way to get health information and tools to people so that they can keep well and we can reduce the impact of chronic diseases worldwide. Through this partnership we will be at the heart of a systemic intervention in healthcare and will help millions of people to live longer, healthier, happier lives, fulfilling our purpose”.

Launched in October 2012, the “Be Healthy, Be Mobile” initiative looks at developing best practices and bringing them to scale and is planned to run for four years initially.
In its first phase, the initiative is focusing on deploying mobile health interventions in areas such as diabetes, smoking cessation, hypertension, wellness and training of health workers. More than 25 countries have already expressed interest in participating. A smoking cessation programme via mobile phones is currently underway in Costa Rica.

Bupa will contribute with expert knowledge, health information and innovative technology to support the adoption of m-Health interventions by governments to address prevention and treatment of NCDs and their common risk factors, including tobacco use, diet, stress and physical inactivity.

(Source: ITU Newsroom)

Thursday, November 14, 2013 5:37:56 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, November 07, 2013
Donato Tramuto, the Founder ofHealth eVillages, announced last week that the organization has made a grant to the Lwala Community Alliance (LCA) for comprehensive Internet service that will improve connectivity between LCA clinicians in rural Kenya. The grant was announced during a visit to Lwala by Tramuto and other members of the Health eVillages team.

With this grant, LCA clinicians working in rural communities in Migori County, Kenya, will be able to communicate and consult directly with doctors at the LCA Hospital in Lwala to help them make critical decisions in the field for their patients. LCA programs focus both on treatment at the Lwala Community Hospital and prevention through health education and outreach in the surrounding communities.

Health eVillages is a program founded by Tramuto and Physicians Interactive in partnership with the not-for-profit Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice & Human Rights (RFK Center). Health eVillages provides iPod(R), iPad(R) and other handheld devices equipped with specialized references and clinical decision support tools to improve primary and preventive healthcare in underserved areas around the world.

"Health eVillages is excited to expand our support of the Lwala Community Alliance to promote better healthcare through wellness, preventative and medical care initiatives", said Tramuto, who is also the CEO and Chairman of Physicians Interactive. "The LCA is dedicated to providing comprehensive care to its patients throughout the region, many of whom cannot make the journey to the main clinic in Lwala. With this comprehensive Internet service, clinicians in remote rural areas are now able to communicate directly on site with doctors back at the Lwala Community Hospital to immediately discuss diagnoses and treatment options, instead of having to travel back to the hospital".

The Lwala Community Alliance was founded in 2006 by brothers Milton Ochieng, M.D., and Fred Ochieng, M.D., to create sustainable solutions for the Lwala community. The Vanderbilt University Medical School graduates created the LCA to fulfill the vision of their late parents to build a hospital and provide healthcare for residents throughout Migori County.

"We are honored to receive this grant from Health eVillages to improve the communications with our clinicians in the field", said James Nardella, LCA's Executive Director. "Due to the threats of HIV, malaria, other infectious diseases and poor sanitation, life expectancy in the region hovers just above 40 years. With this grant, our clinicians will be able to better serve our patients in a more immediate manner in remote rural areas. This will enable the residents of Migori County to take a more proactive role in their own comprehensive well-being".

(Source: HealthCare IT News)

Thursday, November 07, 2013 4:10:39 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, November 01, 2013
PREAMBLE

We, the participants in the second Women With the Wave High Level Forum Series on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Media Inclusion of Women and Girls and Persons with Disabilities, held in Hanoi, Vietnam on the 23rd and 24th October, 2013, make this affirmation of commitment to its goals and outcomes and to the empowering of women and girls and persons with disabilities through media and ICTs.

The first Women With the Wave Forum was held in Seoul, Korea in October 2012.  From that two-day forum the Statement on Empowering Women through Media and ICTs was developed and supported by participants and sponsors.  The statement included a commitment to overarching goals in relation to the empowerment of women and girls to fully participate in, and have access to, the media and information and communication technologies (ICT). It also provided a number of potential initiatives for practical application across the region and a call for participants and sponsors to engage and promote these initiatives. In the second forum 2013 we recognise that another diversity group, persons with disabilities, should be targeted for digital inclusion and employment opportunities in the media and ICT and identified necessary measures to promote their digital inclusion and employment opportunities in media and ICTs.

Therefore, we support a reinforcement of the 2012 Women with the Wave Statement and a call to move forward to implement the updated actions arising from presentations and discussions from the 2013 forum. We also support the additional commitment and relevant activities and outcomes for persons with disabilities.

In thanking the organizers of the 2013 Forum, the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union (ABU), Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (FES), the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Vietnam Television (VTV) and other partners, we note that women and girls make up 50 per cent of the world’s population and there are one billion people living with some form of disability and that equal rights and opportunity underpin healthy economies and societies.
Further, we recognize that the media has a crucial role to play in promoting women and persons with disabilities’ full participation in every aspect of life and society and, to this end, we invite ITU and ABU to endorse this statement with a view to seeking to assist in the practical implementation of its recommendations.

We also call on intergovernmental agencies, in particular ITU, UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia-Pacific (ESCAP), United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and UN Women (UNW), professional associations of broadcasters, especially the ABU, regional training institutions, such as the Asia-Pacific Institute for Broadcasting Development (AIBD) and the Asian Media and Information Communication Centre (AMIC), commercial businesses and Foundations, relevant NGOs and tertiary education institutions, including University journalism and communication departments, to take note of this statement and to undertake, where applicable, to provide support for its recommendations.

COMMITMENT

We are committed to promoting widespread and affordable access to media and information and communication technology (ICT) for women and girls and a gender inclusive media and ICT environment that empowers women and girls to fully participate and give access to expression and decision-making in and through the media and new technologies of communication by being able to:

- work in the media and ICT fields across all levels and occupational groups on and off the screen;
- have access to technological and digital platforms including multilingual and localised content;
- achieve a positive, non-stereotypical and balanced portrayal across all forms of media and technological platforms, including the recognition of women with ICT careers and girls who use ICTs for their empowerment.

We are committed to promoting widespread and affordable accessible media and information and communication technology and a more inclusive media and ICT environment for persons with disabilities by being able to:

- work in the media and ICT fields across a range of levels and occupational groups on and off the screen;
- have improved access to technological and digital platforms and use accessible media and  ICT including multilingual and localised content;
- contribute to a positive and balanced portrayal across media and technological platforms.

IMPLEMENTATION

Specifically, we declare support for the practical application across the region of the following agreed activities and outcomes of the Forum:

-development of a diversity action plan for ABU in 2014;

-implementation of the Broadcasting for All: Focus on Gender guidelines that include strategic and practical applications for use in media and ICT workplaces to promote and implement a gender mainstreaming corporate culture throughout organizations particularly focusing on policies and training that include workplace behaviour, work and family balance conditions of service, positive gender initiatives and career development;

-encouragement for the determining of a framework for the broad provision of training and access to technological and digital media by women and girls and persons with disabilities;

-applying existing research, surveys and findings of the portrayal, stories, faces and voices of the female population as well as persons with disabilities across the region and formulating a broad strategy for the application of fair representations across organizations and platforms and to change stereotypes in media content, language and presentation;

-championing media leaders who promote content and balanced images of girls and women and persons with disabilities;

-piloting UNESCO’s Gender Sensitive Indicators for Media (GSIM) as a practical tool to assess and encourage gender equality and women’s empowerment in media;

-collaborating with partners, such as the ITU, to promote women and girls in media and ICTs, including developing programming story lines with women and ICT careers, organising events on International Girls in ICT Day, promoting the Women’s Digital Literacy Campaign and supporting the recommendations of the 2013 Broadband Commission Working Group on Broadband and Gender;

-securing industry-wide commitments to take steps towards positive change to promote success stories on radio and television broadcasts;
-sharing existing resources amongst stakeholders, particularly in regard to gender and disability;

-gaining specific attention and assistance, from the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union (ABU) through its various specialized departments and its member organizations, to the needs of smaller media institutions (such as in island regions and remote areas), thus enabling out-reach to women and girls and persons with disabilities and their empowerment in marginalized societies;

-development and distribution of educational modules for use in secondary schools, tertiary education institutions and other scholastic agencies (and, where applicable, by distance learning modes and techniques) to introduce students to gender and media/ICT issues, and the role of media in society;

-making use of accessible broadcasting tools such as the ITU report, Making Television Accessible and the ITU Standardization Bureau Focus Group on Audio Visual Accessibility toolkit to work toward accessible media and ICTs for persons with disabilities, including by setting targets for introducing accessible broadcasting, accessible emergency communications and supporting a campaign for the accessible broadcasting of the 2016 Paralympic Games.

-adopt measures to ensure the early warning system and disaster risk reduction programs are accessible for persons with disabilities and meet universal design principles and UNCRPD, including provisions for access to alternative communication systems.

CONCLUSION

We recall the inspirational discourse of the two-day ABU/FES/ITU/UNESCO/VTV sponsored Women With the Wave High Level Forum and, in particular, the successful media and ICT case studies and models shared by speakers from throughout the region. The collegiality of fellow Forum participants, the professionalism of the videos and films they exhibited to the Forum, the commitment of keynote presenters and the atmosphere of optimism expressed by all present have reinforced our belief that affirmative action on the Forum recommendations is vital to ensuring the forward progress of the empowerment of women and girls and people with disabilities through media and ICTs.
To this end, we call on all who can assist to recognize the digital wave now sweeping the world and to join us in supporting the preparation of women and girls and people with disabilities for the opportunities and benefits which the knowledge society is now bringing to families worldwide and which will do so even more in the future.

******

Friday, November 01, 2013 4:59:52 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, October 23, 2013


Mobile Monitoring Station, a team of student entrepreneurs from Chile, won the 9th annual Intel Global Challenge at UC Berkeley, a global business plan competition that encourages student entrepreneurs to tackle some of the world's most pressing issues through computing technology. The competition provides a unique entrepreneurship experience by giving teams access to top venture capitalists and investors in Silicon Valley.

Mobile Monitoring Station, comprised of team members from engineering research and development company SoluNova, Chilean mining company Coldeco and the University of Chile, created a set of portable sensors that collects industrial workers' biomedical data, such as heart rate, in real time. The sensors, which are applied directly to the workers' clothes, transmit valuable biomedical information to devices such as smartphones, which then push the data to the cloud. The solution will be offered as a service, supplying industrial sites with the hardware and software for a monthly fee per worker. The winning team, driven by the lack of existing data on industrial workers' exposure to health risks, expects the sensors to result in a considerable drop in health dangers in this industry.

"At Intel, we know that innovation is critical to growth for individuals, businesses and economies", said Staci Palmer, Intel's director of Global Strategic Initiatives and Marketing in the Corporate Affairs Group. "Through the Intel Global Challenge at UC Berkeley, students around the world gain lifelong entrepreneurship and innovation skills they can apply throughout their careers, in fields ranging from healthcare to transportation".

The Intel Foundation awarded $100,000 total in cash prizes, including a $50,000 grand prize and three $10,000 awards for teams taking first place in the following categories: Internet, mobile and software computing; computing for social innovation; and hardware and computing. In addition, four $5,000 special awards were presented.

Innovations from the three first-prize winners included industries ranging from technology to healthcare. Gameleon of Bulgaria developed a cloud-based platform that allows anyone to create, publish, play and monetize Web games with only a browser, regardless of programming skills or experience. Karmashop of Mexico created a crowd-funding platform that allows users to customize how they receive donations and, in return, gives donors "Karma Points". For example, through a Karmashop campaign raising money for community members affected by the recent floods in Mexico, donors have the option to contribute items including drinking water, first aid and shelter. Tensive of Italy developed implantable biomaterials for the reconstruction of large bone and tissue defects, caused by osteoporosis, trauma or tumor removal. The patented technology replicates the patient's blood vessels and accelerates the natural regeneration of bone and tissue.

(Source: Intel Newsroom)

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 11:05:57 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, September 27, 2013
A new report released today demonstrates how Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), have become a positive force of transformation and a crucial element of any personal development, empowerment and institutional framework for inclusive development.

While the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) represent a concerted effort to address global poverty, there is a striking gap in the current MDGs and their inclusion of persons with disabilities. The estimated 1 billion persons with disabilities are still excluded from equitable access to resources (education, healthcare, etc.) and as a result persons with disabilities experience disproportionately high rates of poverty. In spite of the conclusion of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2006, disability remains largely invisible in most mainstream development processes.

The High-Level Meeting on Disability and Development (HLMDD) of the sixty eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly, taking place in New York, provides a historic opportunity to rectify this omission and will discuss the issues that should be reflected in the post-2015 framework for development.

“The ICT Opportunity for a Disability-Inclusive Development Framework” contributes to a better understanding of the extent to which ICTs can enable and accelerate the social and economic inclusion of persons with disabilities. It lists challenges that are still to be addressed while outlining concrete actions to be undertaken by each group of stakeholders and a set of indicators to help measure progress towards the achievement of a disability-inclusive development agenda.

This report is the result of collaborative input from the UN Broadband Commission for Digital Development, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs (G3ICT), the International Disability Alliance (IDA), the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Microsoft, the Telecentre.org Foundation and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Launching the report, Secretary General of the ITU, Dr Hamadoun I. Touré, said “The use of information and communication technologies should be at the heart of any strategy to promote the social and economic inclusion of persons with disabilities. We have the tools at our hands; the remaining challenge is to expand access to these technologies to all and to make ICTs accessible and affordable for persons with disabilities”.

The content is based on feedback from a global consultation on ICT, Disability and Development, carried out from 20 May to 17 June 2013 in support of the preparatory process of the HLMDD. The consultation gathered over 150 expert inputs from relevant organizations and key individuals from over 55 countries and representing multiple stakeholders, including governments, academic institutions, organizations of persons with disabilities, civil society organizations, private sector and regional and international organizations.

The report highlights that when ICT are available, affordable and accessible, they can significantly improve the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all aspects of society.

- Web services constitute the access technology with the greatest impact in promoting the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all areas of development (e.g. social networking, teleworking, online educational classes, telemedicine).

- Mobile devices and services constituted the second-most valued ICT. In particular, the use of mobile phones is instrumental to enable independent living of persons with disabilities (e.g. SMS, captioned telephone, mobile banking services, and access to emergency services).

-Television is the third-ranked ICT in the assessment, specifically for its use as a tool to access government services and information (e.g. news broadcasts, information and education programmes).

Regarding the challenges to overcome, some barriers are universal while others affect specific areas of development.

- The cost of assistive technologies, which is comprised of the cost of the technology as well as the cost of assistive technology assessment, training and support services, is still one of the main barriers that prevents many persons with disabilities to fully access healthcare services, benefit all educational levels, be competitive in the labour market and to live independently.

- A lack of access to ICT accessibility technologies is a pervasive barrier that is further reinforced by the lack of policies which foster widespread availability of accessible ICTs and the lack of effective policy implementation.

- Limited availability and use of ICT in general greatly constrains the use of ICT as a solution to tackling development challenges.

Addressing these barriers requires the collaboration of the main stakeholders involved in each sector, as well as concrete actions to be undertaken by each group of stakeholders and relevant indicators to monitor progress.

- Governments can play a key role in stimulating the introduction of ICT-enabled solutions adapted to the needs of persons with disabilities, increasing the availability of accessible ICTs and promoting the affordability of assistive technologies in social, educational, economic and other domains. One priority action is the inclusion of accessibility requirements in procurement policies. In addition, governments can foster a greater awareness of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities as a comprehensive and integral instrument which highlights the importance of ICTs and accessibility for the enjoyment of one’s human rights and fundamental freedoms. This entails updating disability legislation to include ICTs in the legal definition of accessibility. Through regular consultation with organizations of persons with disabilities, they can improve the provision and quality of accessible ICT.

- Private sector entities can contribute by increasing research and development efforts, incorporating universal design principles at the earliest stage possible and recruit persons with disabilities in product development departments to develop accessible ICTs. Another priority action is to address the shortage of IT professionals with ICT accessibility skills (in-house training, industry gatherings and publications). The private sector can further remove attitudinal barriers towards hiring persons with disabilities and promote accessible and inclusive workplaces. Through these contributions, employers can greatly contribute to a society where persons with disabilities can participate in work life, and have increased independence.

- Civil society organizations have a key role in raising policymakers’ awareness of the remaining accessibility barriers, becoming more active in the work conducted by international standards organizations. Furthermore, they also have the ability to bring about social progress and economic growth by raising the awareness and building the capacity of persons with disabilities and their relatives in using ICT to facilitate their own economic and social inclusion. Finally, advocating for the mainstreaming of the use of the universal design principle in all development efforts is crucial for ensuring that the international development framework is disability-inclusive.

- The UN system and other international organizations must implement operational activities to meet disability-inclusive development goals, complemented by the monitoring and evaluation of development efforts at the global, regional and national levels. Also necessary are performance reviews to assess whether development policies, programmes and projects are effective and results-driven. It is imperative to ensure that this analysis is quantitative and supported by consistent data, and that such analysis is designed with the participation of persons with disabilities, in order to make sure that the correct factors are measured. Lastly, the UN must ensure that it keeps implementing awareness-raising activities and mobilization campaigns in order to create a demand for national governmental action.

- International standards organizations can also play a special role in enabling a disability-inclusive development agenda by providing a neutral platform from which to develop and/or harmonize international standards and provide recommendations related to accessible ICTs. To achieve this, standards development bodies must facilitate the participation of relevant experts and delegates with disabilities. Furthermore, these organizations can contribute to the promotion of R&D focused on developing specific ICT-enabled solutions for persons with disabilities. International standards organizations must also raise policy makers’ awareness of accessibility barriers to be addressed.

The report is released during the High-Level side-event to the HLMDD “The UN delivering as one in enabling a disability-inclusive development agenda towards 2015 and beyond”, taking place today, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

Download the full version of the new report here.

For more information on ITU, visit: http://www.itu.int/accessibility

Follow ITU on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/ITU/103018419782973

Follow ITU on Twitter: https://twitter.com/itu

(Source: ITU Newsroom)

Thursday, September 26, 2013 11:01:39 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, September 17, 2013
 

We, the participants of the BYND2015 Global Youth Summit, represented here and online, on behalf of  other  young  people  around  the  world,  in  recognition  of  our  unique  place  and  role  in  a  deeply transformed  and  interconnected world,  which will be shaped by the  post-2015  global development agenda declare the following:Youth  are  transforming  our  world.  We  are  a  force  for  progress.  Ensuring  our  full  participation  in decision-making processes is vital to improving democracy.  We urgently require measurable targets to monitor the empowerment of young people at regional, national and international levels.

We call on  member states  to provide more flexible, dynamic, transparent  and open structures  for governance that engages more directly with citizens. We call  for the creation  of open data, information  and technical knowledge, in all  areas  critical to our  lives.  Health,  civic  engagement,  online  protection,  environmental  protection  and  economic success all  depend  on having  unfettered access  to knowledge which  ICTs can  extend  to everyone. The spread of information amongst  young people  can directly  foster empowerment and innovation on a global scale.

The  key  to  a  new  global  development  agenda  is  innovation.  Old  methods  and  systems are  poorly suited  to  the  transformed  and  interconnected  communities  we  live  in  today.  We  call  on  member states, civil society and the private sector to foster innovation to build the future we want. A key  barrier  is  a lack of  universal,  global access to  ICT  technologies, platforms  and devices and the underlying infrastructure to  support them. Youth can act as  both beneficiaries and  ambassadors for wider and improved access.

We  require  equitable  and  universal  access  to  ICTs,  particularly  for  women  and  girls,  and  other groups marginalized by the digital divide, for the following reasons (in order of priority):

To get ahead:
- We call on governments, civil society and the private sector to work together to provide the training and resources young people need to innovate and create the businesses and industries of the future;
-  We seek access to education and knowledge sharing, regardless of where we are or whether we can pay;
-  We need new and innovative methods that lower barriers to youth employment and ensure decent, rewarding and fulfilling work;
-  We want to  ensure  all students  have access to  ICT  skills  and technologies  for  their intellectual, economic and political empowerment ;
-  We  require  education  systems  that equip  students  with  the  theoretical  knowledge and  a  practical  mix  of  marketable,  innovative  and  relevant  skills  to  compete  in  a global digital economy.

To change our world:
- We  demand  a  voice.  We  ask  that  member  states  pursue  methods  to  make  voting, openness  and  accountability  more  feasible  online.  We  believe  this  will  make governments  more  accessible,  open  and  understandable.  We  further  call  for sustained,  youth-driven  mechanisms  by  which  to  make  our  voices  heard  at  local, national and international levels;
- We  are  deeply  concerned  by  the  barriers  between  leaders  and  young  citizens.  We call for innovative use of communication technologies  as  a  means of  engaging  with those who represent us;
-  We seek online spaces where we can share and express the richness and diversity of our cultural heritages and religious practices, and break down barriers of intolerance and  fear,  and  building  communities  based  on  cultural  preservation  and  mutual respect;
-  We seek means to move from social commentary  to social change and become more responsible  and  proactive  global  citizens,  including  through  strong  support  for community-based volunteerism.

To respect our environment:
-  We seek better access to and dissemination of  honest and accurate information  on environmental  issues  and  guidance  on  steps  we  can  take  to  protect  the environment;
-  We  call  on  member  states  to  leverage  innovative  ICT-based  tools  for  warning, information, preparedness and recovery in the face of natural disasters;
-  We  urgently  require  broader  and  more  efficient  use  of  renewable  and  sustainable energy and food sources, as well as means and methods to further expand their use, most noticeably in the agricultural sector;
- We seek a world where we don't have to choose between quality of life and quality of  the  environment,  through  ethically  sourced  products  and  commodities, sustainable resource use, green businesses and proper disposal of e-waste;
-  We  call  for  commitments  from  member  states,  civil  society  and  businesses  to support  those  who  choose  to  be  environmentally  responsible,  through  incentives and rewards.

To be smart and safe:
- We  recognize  the  positive  and  negative  aspects  of  new  technologies  and  call  for information,  education  and  support  to  make  our  online  communities  safe  and secure. We urge educational institutions and  digital content creators to aid us in this process;
-  We  advocate  that  the  same  rights  of  freedom  of  speech,  association  and  privacy granted in the  real world be explicitly extended online;
-  We urge  fellow young people to  act  and present themselves  responsibly online  and for educational and social structures to guide us in this process;
-  We call for policies and appropriate and effective  frameworks that protect the use of private data and intellectual property, and deter online criminal activity.

To be healthy:
-  We seek innovative systems which connect people to information on health services, including mental health services,  to improve issues of accessibility, affordability and acceptability;
-  Geography should not be a barrier to health care. We seek technologies that connect us with health care remotely;
-  We  seek  tools  to  better  inform  us  about  healthy  lifestyles  and  health  concerns, which help us act on that information, especially in areas of sexual and reproductive health,  and  in  dealing  with  issues  of  disability,  including  knowledge  to  reduce problems of stigma and fear associated with many diseases;
-  We  call  for  the  widespread  availability  to  report  and  receive  information,  through ICTs,  of  outbreaks,  disasters,  epidemics  and/or  other  events  which  endanger  our health;
-  We  call  on  member  states  to  empower  young  people  to  develop  ICT  tools  that improve  the  experience  of  health care  while taking into account best practices and bioethics that are currently part of offline healthcare processes.

In Conclusion:
We call on the United Nations, the international community and all member states to consider our words  and  put  them  into  action. We  call  upon  all  young  people  around  the  world,  in  partnership with world leaders,  to treat this document  not as an outcome but  as a starting place  for continued dialogue. Young people  should be included as  full partners  in  the post-2015 process and preserve the world we want for the youth of tomorrow.

Access to the declaration text here:
http://www.itu.int/en/bynd2015/Documents/bynd2015-global-youth-declaration-en.pdf

(Source: BYND 2015 Web)

Tuesday, September 17, 2013 9:36:57 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, August 29, 2013

After spending about six months in the process every year, Lobeni has managed with outstanding efforts to get her licence renewal so far, but this clearly costs her a lot of money and time that she often cannot afford. Just like Lobeni, nurses and midwives in Malawi have to follow these courses and ICTs are playing a role to make this possible in rural areas without the burden of travelling to main towns.

Thanks to an ICT-based Continuing Professional Development (CPD), implemented by IICD in collaboration with the National Organization of Nurses and Midwives (NONM) in Malawi, Lobeni has not only gained more credits to renew her licence, but she has also enhanced her computer skills, access to current health information and self assessment.

Besides more complex comprehensive solutions on e-learning systems (CMS, LMS, etc.) the project started right after the ‘stone age’, by having staff from NONM scan the official nurse manual, which was later saved as PDF and made accessible to all nurses at the health facility. NONM also bought laptops, modems and Internet bundles, and trained about 20 nurses in basic ICT skills. A CDP coordinator, who is in charge of grading the exams within this system, was also trained.

Common challenges usually found in rural and often impoverished communities, such as shortage of equipment and frequent power blackouts, can be overcome by expressly setting up solutions with minimum bandwidth and energy requirements. Yet in this kind of ICT-based projects, the main challenges are often people-related. In order to facilitate multi-stakeholder involvement and create local ownership, the project and technical solution are designed together with the implementing partner, including the capacity development activities, training, installation and customisation.

Aiming to explore and analyse the possibilities of taking the NONM’s CDP platform to the next level, IICD’s Technical Adviser Maurizio Bricola travelled to Malawi earlier this year, “we had a very productive first meeting that ended up with four main action points. After the meeting I had a session on Drupal and Quiz module with the ICT officer to discuss local installation and customisation”.

NONM made a prompt start in three hospitals, the Mchinji District Hospital, the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Blantyre and St. Andrew Hospital in Kasungu, with a potential to reach out to about 1000 nurses.

Further details

Thursday, August 29, 2013 10:23:16 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 


The report has been realized for the Millennia2015 International Conference, UNESCO, Paris, 3-6 Decem ber 2012. This work is a collaborative and participative contribution to the Foresight Research on the variable V08 “Women and eHealth: connected medical knowledge benefiting all”, conducted at the Destree Institute, Namur, Belgium and provides the results of the investigation on Women, Health and ICTs.

Based on the data collected, the study has considered four dimensions of the roles of women in eHealth:

1. Women as Beneficiaries (WB): Women are at the core of family healthcare in communities and have the greatest need to have access to and use ICTs for their personal health and that of their family members.
2. Women as Healthcare Professionals (WHP): Women are at the frontline, of family care in their role as healthcare workers in communities. They require ICTs to facilitate effective communication with other healthcare workers, with doctors, and patients.
3. Women as ICT professionals (WICT): Women are the engineers and technicians who develop innovative and adapted devices and applications that help reach the most isolated settings and communities.
4. Women as Leaders (WL): Women advocate at all levels, from raising new opportunities to partnering with the private sector, collaborating and networking, improving funding mechanisms, and leading eHealth initiatives in communities.

Proposed ICT Solutions
1. Radios and Televisions: WB, WHP
Radios and TVs continue to play a major role in the dissemination of health information and should be incorporated with mobile phones and Internet services to reach more women.
2. Mobiles, tablets, and other electronic devices: WB, WHP
mHealth or mobile health shows interesting results but remains limited to pilot projects that hardly expand at national and regional levels. Most women who received health related SMSs on their mobile phones prefer messages delivered by voice, using voice commands. An example of this speech-to-text application is the iPhone’s “Siri”, in which the user only has to be able to speak, not to read or write. Incoming messages could have a text-to-speech option, so that messages are “read” out loud to those unable to read.
3. Telemedicine: WHP
Telemedicine remains a “male” sector at all levels: medical, technical, and engineering. Women are beneficiaries as patients where such services are made available, yet just a few female doctors, nurses or midwives are active in Telemedicine services.
4. Free Call Lines: WB
Many WeHealth members emphasized the need to promote the adoption of free call lines that enable women to reach health centers and health service workers. These lines can be used in particular to support women living in difficult situations, such as domestic violence, natural disasters, war/conflicts, and as refugees.
5. Alternative energy solutions: WB
Where energy is scarce or unreliable, local solutions using solar or wind power show promise. Young girls in India have found a urine-based solution to provide enough energy for mobile phones.
Health Information.
6. One of the most cited areas of interest to women (WB) is receiving regular information on maternal and child health, family health, disease control, HIV/AIDS, malaria,
cancer and vaccination.
Full report

(Source: ECWT)

Thursday, August 29, 2013 9:58:29 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, June 20, 2013
Desafio Intel provides entrepreneurship education and Silicon Valley immersion for the best computing startups by university students and recent graduates from across Latin America. This program contributes to developing an entrepreneurial ecosystem in Latin America by providing a bridge between these high potential young entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley, converting them into the most competitive tech start-ups in Latin America. Through Desafio Intel, the participants will receive training, mentorship and access to the best practices of entrepreneurship from Silicon Valley and around the world.

The eight finalist have been announced – meet the teams who will be representing their countries at the Finals at YouNoodle Camp this year. Congratulations to all the entrepreneurs!

Appetite+, Venezuela
Have you ever wondered what apps your friends have? Or what apps they actually like? How about a better way to discover cool new apps? Appetite+ is a social network for app-discovery that allows you to see into your friends Iphone to find great apps they use.



FractalUp, Peru
There is no clear order when learning in the noisy world of education. eLearners need a guide map and good quality content. FractalUp assists your learning search with graphical paths. It’s more precise than googling and less tedious than wikis, because it shows your position, using a Dynamic EdTech Engine.

LUX Sensor, Brazil
Our startup is developing an OptoElectroMechanical system to analysis fluids and gas by measuring refraction index using a high sensibility method patented by UNICAMP. Our system is the solution for fuel-optimized engine control for fuel quality, required by the automaker to get efficiency and performance demand by the government.

Mobile Monitoring Station, Chile
Measurement of worker-related variables, such as heart rate or air pollutants is usually done with fixed sensors. This limits the spatial coverage and does not give a true picture of the workers status. We propose gathering this information with wearable sensors and upload readings to a centralized cloud service. A service business model, with a cloud-based interface and leased hardware, allows customers to have a worry free experience, focusing solely on the important information gathered directly by workers in the field.

Modular Thoracic Strap for the Automated Monitoring of Vital Signs, Costa Rica
Detect potential health problems in a person, giving notice of the state of vital signs in the exact moments of crisis by creating a modular thoracic band based on medical parameters; with the purpose of facilitate the work of those responsible for the care of patients with certain physical limitations.

SchoolControl, Mexico
SchoolControl is a communication platform through which teachers, students and parents can find school information, such as: grades, announcements, calendars, events, reports, tasks, homework and details about the academic performance of the student. Access to all this information, using any desktop, mobile devices such as, iPhones, iPads, WP7s, & Blackberries.

WeHaus, Argentina
Home Automation Made Simple – Value added service for telcos.

Whelmo, Colombia
Whelmo is a light weight bracelet to wirelessly monitor harms to a baby’s health. Whelmo can measure the baby’s heart rate, blood oxygen level and location, and send the information to a mobile device. Whelmo will help you protect your baby when you can’t be at his side.

(Source: Desafío Intel)

Thursday, June 20, 2013 4:22:32 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, June 07, 2013
The GSMA unveiled research that demonstrates the socio - economic transformation that mHealth adoption will have in Latin America, with findings indicating that more than 40 million additional patients could be treated in Brazil and Mexico alone in 2017 through the use of mHealth services. A new GSMA report, developed in collaboration with PwC and released today at HOSPITALAR 2013 in São Paulo, identified significant benefits of mHealth implementation in Brazil and Mexico in 2017 that will:

Empower poor and chronic patients
- Extend healthcare to 28.4 million additional patients in Brazil and 15.5 million patients in Mexico in 2017
- Equip around 16 million citizens to improve their lifestyle and reduce the impact of chronic diseases, prolonging lives

Sustain universal healthcare systems
- Enhance quality of care and efficiency of care delivery, saving $17.9 billion in costs ($14.1 billion in Brazil and $3.8 billion in Mexico)
- Create 200,000 jobs to support mHealth deployments across Brazil and Mexico

Improve quality of life
- Save almost 16,000 lives and add 23,000 life years, as well as save doctors 14.6 million working days through improved prevention, diagnosis and treatment
- Ensure that citizens constitute a healthier workforce, adding $ 12.9 billion to the GDP of Mexico and Brazil

“mHealth can help countries like Brazil and Mexico tackle the significant challenge of providing universal healthcare to a large, dispersed population”, said Jeanine Vos,Executive Director, mHealth at the GSMA. “The pressures on healthcare resources and the increasing burden of chronic diseases make it key to deploy innovative and cost-effective solutions. mHealth willenhance the reach, efficiency of spend and effectiveness of care to provide better quality health services to more people. Therefore it is critical that governments and regulators work with healthcare providers and mobile operators to drive mHealth adoption”.

For more information on the GSMA’s mHealth programme and to view the report visit: www.gsma.com/connectedliving/mhealth.

(Source: GSMA)

Friday, June 07, 2013 9:13:06 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, May 21, 2013
E-health initiative, an electronic health delivery system, was launched on last Friday to enable doctors reach their patients online and bring health care to the door steps of the citizenry.

The E-health initiative, a remote doctor/patient interface allows a patient to see a doctor without leaving his home or office.
It does not seek to prevent patients from visiting hospital but to augment existing health care delivery services.

The launch was on the theme: “Convenience in Health Care Delivery” and has a safe harbour statement: “We do not handle emergency cases”.

To assess the product one has to go online to book an appointment with a doctor on ehealthghana.com after which an appointment coordinator will assign doctors to patient depending on the ailment.

Professor Agyemang Badu Akosa, a former Director General of Ghana Health Service, who launched the product, said the country’s health care is patterned on the colonial model, and health care could only be assessed at the capital, regional and district levels thereby creating a missing link in the peripherals.

He said if the initiative is rolled out properly many people would benefit from health care services irrespective of the distance, especially in a technologically advanced era.
Prof Akosa, however, noted that the challenge is with internet penetration in the country but expressed the hope that with fibre optic gaining grounds is positive light at the end of the tunnel.

He welcomed the initiative and said it would beneficial to the rural areas where E-kiosk fitted with e-health internet would be placed and operated by a volunteer and an interpreter.

Prof Edmund Delle, Founder of Rabito Clinic, lauded the initiative but cautioned that sustainability is very crucial to the success of the scheme.
“What is the use of a specialist whose activities are confined to his office while the rural areas are underserved”, he said.

Prof Delle noted that “an initiative which enables a doctor or specialist to reach out to more people without traveling too much for outreach programmes is very much welcomed”.

Mr Patrick Dasoberi, originator of the E-health Initiative, said it would serve as a platform for doctors, to share ideas and experiences relating to patients, as well as a network for pharmacists, laboratory technicians, volunteers, service couriers, who are the core of the scheme.

Further details

Tuesday, May 21, 2013 11:39:24 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, April 11, 2013
The report, produced by consultancy PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) India, says that mobile phone interventions to ensure patients comply with treatment, medical stock is available and healthcare workers stick to treatment guidelines could save some of the three million lives lost each year across Africa to HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and pregnancy-related conditions.

"Many of the deadly conditions are relatively simple to treat, prevent or contain. SMS reminders to check stock levels at health centres have shown promising results in reducing stock-outs of key combination therapy medication for malaria, TB and HIV", it says.
"Delivering mobile-assisted awareness to pregnant mothers and traditional birth attendants could reduce prenatal and maternal mortality by up to 30 per cent, while programmes that track mobile-usage patterns have been very successful in predicting disease outbreaks and in reporting malaria reporting adherence", according to the report.

Africa's low adoption of mHealth solutions is mainly due to a lack of health literacy among patients, says Shashank Tripathi, leader of the strategy and research practice at PwC India and one of the study authors.

Patricia Mechael, executive director of the US-based mHealth Alliance, says mHealth can help to strengthen overall health systems. For instance, she says, equipping field health workers with mHealth skills and phone applications can enable them to instantly communicate with authorities so they can take rapid action.
The potential number of lives that mHealth initiatives could save in Africa over five years to 2017 differs greatly, from 1,500 in Botswana up to 143,000 in Somalia, the report estimates.

Besides differences in mobile phone ownership and use, these variations are also due to differing mortality rates for individual countries, says Tripathi.
The report was launched at the annual Mobile World Conference in Barcelona, Spain, earlier this year (25-28 February).

Access to Full Report

(Source: SciDev. Net)

Thursday, April 11, 2013 3:27:35 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, February 08, 2013
The inclusion of ICTs (Information and Communication Technologies) can help to eliminate the borders in access to health, while improving the access to global knowledge for the benefit of professionals and users of health services.

For example, the incorporation of these technologies can help the health sector to exchange information about patients and treatments more quickly and safely, including pharmacological knowledge, methodologies healthcare or medical procedures.Through the inclusion of ICTs, it is also possible to improve access to health services through remote care systems, thereby enhancing universal access to health even in isolated areas.

Furthermore, these technologies enable greater access to knowledge by citizens and professionals, facilitating the exchange and dissemination of information through technology platforms. Therefore, the incorporation of ICT in the health sector is an effective way to combat the problems of this key sector for economic and social development of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Check out the infographic to learn more about the advantages of using ICT in the health sector:


(Source: BID)

Friday, February 08, 2013 10:24:21 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, January 17, 2013
Connectivity between patients requiring medical advice and the hospital is practical and effectively provides crucial medical support. BNH Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, believes in investing in communication technology fundamentals to connect health anywhere, and anytime.

Despite being centrally located between Silom and Sathorn Road, Bangkok’s business, financial, and entertainment districts, BNH’s network reaches further under the “Urban Community” concept.

“Virtual Emergency Room (ER)”, launched in 2011, serves as a direct means of communication between BNH’s Emergency Room (ER) and patients via Skype. Initially, this telehealth service covered only nearby hotels, serviced apartments and condominiums where many foreigners, tourists, and foreign businesspeople live but has now expanded beyond this.

Patients or helpers can speak to and see the nurses in the ER from wherever they are with simple tools including internet connection, a computer, a tablet PC or a smart phone that supports video calls. People wishing to contact the hospital need to add the hospital identification “bnhhospital” to their contact list.

BNH’s Emergency Room (ER) staff is on standby 24/7 to receive calls and provide medical advice and support. Using a web camera, the nurses can see the condition of the patients, assess the situation and provide advice based on their findings. Bystanders can be instructed and guided to provide first aid and even Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) while the ambulance is dispatched.

The Virtual ER project has been managed by co-operation between the hospital’s international marketing and IT department. A network system for Virtual ER has been installed separately from the main hospital’s network to create an independent and dedicated connection. In the ER, computers and high-definition cameras for Skype have been configured exclusively for this project.

(Source: FutureGov)


Thursday, January 17, 2013 4:58:46 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Singapore Silver Pages (SSP) launched recently a mobile app called “Mobile Eldercare Locator” (MEL), that allows users to learn more information about eldercare and search for health and social care services, based on the location and type of service required by the elderly.

SSP, is a specialised one-stop resource entity launched by the Agency for Integrated Care in February 2011. It aims to address the information needs of the ageing population in Singapore by providing a single source where the elderly, their family members and caregivers can access trusted and authoritative information on eldercare.

The MEL app enables users to learn more about the services offered by more than 1000 featured health service providers and locate them easily with its built-in directional maps and instructions.

In addition, the app also features a GPS-enabled journey planner that instructs users how to get to the location of the service provider either by private car, taxi, bus or MRT.

During Singapore’s first ever Community Health Assist Scheme (CHAS) Health Carnival, Health Minister Gan Kim Yong encouraged attendees to download the app to spread awareness and understanding on critical health conditions experienced by many Singaporeans.

“With more Singaporeans suffering from chronic diseases, there is a need to help people understand their own state of health better and support them in managing any conditions”, the Minister said in an official statement.

The MEL app is available on iOS and Android platforms for download free of charge.

(Source: FutureGov)


Thursday, January 17, 2013 11:41:41 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
UNICEF Philippines, in cooperation with Globe Telecommunications, embarked on an initiative which aims to leverage the use of Information and Communication Technologies to achieve better health outcomes among women and children in geographically isolated and disadvantaged areas in the country’s provinces and municipalities.

The initiative is dubbed as rCHITS which stands for ‘Real-time Monitoring of Key Maternal and Child Health Indicators through the use of the Community Health Information Tracking System’. It is a computerization project aimed at achieving a more effective and efficient system of managing health information on children and women living in disadvantaged areas. Globe Telecom donated Php one million (USD 24,000) as support to UNICEF’s programme.

According to Tomoo Hozumi, Country Representative of UNICEF Philippines, the donated money will go towards expanding the rCHITS program to reach more provinces in the coming year.

“Through this program, we are able to gather and consolidate real-time data on mother and child health indicators and help the local government make informed and well-planned decisions on health issues in their provinces”, said Hozumi.

He added that the project was originally conceived as a tool in support of community based injury prevention, but evolved to what is known today as rCHITS through the collaborative efforts of the University of the Philippines National Telehealth Center, UNICEF and Globe.

The multi-stakeholder cooperation moved towards developing a system specifically designed to monitor and obtain key maternal and child health indicators in selected municipalities towards the achievement of Millennium Development Goals four and five, which is reduction of child mortality and improvement of maternal health.

(Source: FutureGov)

Thursday, January 17, 2013 10:08:11 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 09, 2012

The Vodafone Foundation Smart Accessibility Awards is a contest to promote the development of IT applications designed to improve the lives of those with disabilities and people that are older, to help them get more actively involved in society. 

In 2012 we celebrate the II Edition after the great results of last year competition. In 2011 over 60 apps were received and more than 100 people participated in the awards. Find more information about 2011 finalists and winners.

The programme is supported and co-organized by AGE Platform Europe, the European network of around 160 organizations of and for people aged 50+, and the European Disability Forum (EDF), the NGO that represents the interests of 80 million Europeans with disabilities.

Launched in Brussels, the competition will award the best smartphone application in four areas:

  Social participation: refers to applications which help users to become more involved in today's society and help them benefit from using new technologies, whatever their age and/or capacity.   The aim is to help everyone to access the web and social media through smartphones.

  Independent living: refers to applications which help users with everyday tasks such as washing or opening a door easily and safely so that they can live more independently

   Mobility: refers to applications which enable users to travel freely and safely whatever kind of transport system they would like to use. It also refers to the use of GPS and locations apps which can help guide people in unfamiliar places.

   Wellbeing: refers to applications which improve the users' health and overall feeling of wellbeing.

Entrants can compete for a share of the €200k prize fund from 30 May 2012 to 15 October 2012. Finalist will present their application to the jury in a final event that will take place in December in Brussels.

Here are six testimonials which can help to inspire you to create new ways of making technology accessible for all: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yt4crzvwaYA&feature=player_embedded

Further details



Tuesday, October 09, 2012 10:25:17 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, October 08, 2012

One of the most prominent themes of this week’s General Assembly has been using low-cost mobile technology to achieve Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5: drastically lowering child mortality while boosting maternal and reproductive health in developing nations.

Since there could be 50 billion mobile devices with broadband access by 2017, as Ericsson CEO Hans Vestberg predicted at the recent Social Good Summit, it’s no wonder that mobile phones are being harnessed in areas that may be remote and resource-limited, but are no longer disconnected from global health solutions. Here’s a look of three nascent initiatives using mobile technology to create a global health impact:

1. Perhaps the most effective means of empowering women in developing nations to make informed health-care decisions is through basic, adaptable messaging. For the past year, USAID, Johnson & Johnson, and the mHealth alliance have developed the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action (MAMA) to connect with over 20 million expectant and new mothers in 35 countries. Using simple mobile technology, MAMA offers vital health information on everything from swaddling to breast-feeding to immunizations.

MAMA has already been effective in South Africa, Indonesia and Bangladesh, where expectant and new mothers now have access (often for the first time) to a global sharing of timely, topical, culturally relevant health information.

2. Medic Mobile transcends the communication and geographic obstacles that all too often limit the efforts of health-care workers in developing nations. As CEO Josh Nesbit told the Social Good Summit audience, Medic Mobile started out by equipping 100 frontline community health workers in Malawi with mobile phones to facilitate essential services for pregnant women and newborn babies.

Nesbit saw the opportunity to offer critical care services in remote areas by harnessing a mobile phone infrastructure that already existed. Considering WHO’s assessment that half of all maternal deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, and that there are more cell phones on the African continent than in the United States, Nesbit’s plan made perfect sense.

3. The next frontier in improving the health of mothers and children is digitizing food assistance. Enter the Better than Cash Alliance, which is helping some of the world’s most indigent populations by transitioning from cash payments to electronic aid, creating a “cash-lite” world.

Through mobile phones and text messages, the Better than Cash Alliance can deliver digital food vouchers, or “e-vouchers”, that enable people to buy food from local markets. According to WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin, “By 2015, WFP expects 30 percent of its assistance programs to be delivered in the form of cash and digital food”.

(Source: The Interdependent)


Monday, October 08, 2012 8:36:59 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

The mHealh Alliance and the Innovation Working Group (IWG) awarded IICD a grant for its mobile community health programme in Mali. In this programme, mothers who act as Community Workers use mobile phones to strengthen their malaria prevention work. For the programme, IICD partners with mobile provider Orange Mali and French NGO RAES.

The awarded programme trains 45 mothers in the use of mobile phones and the use of a special mobile application to collect data during visits to the communities around Bamako. The data that the mothers collect, help health specialists from nearby health centres to improve patient case management by conducting prevention, diagnosis and treatment in a more efficient and cost effective way. The grant enables IICD to further improve child and maternal health monitoring in Yirimadjo, a poor outskirt community of Bamako. The mothers who are health workers also come from this area, where malaria is the most urgent problem. Because of malaria, maternal and child mortality in the area is high.

IICD and its partners will expand the programme to 150 more Community Health Workers in Mali and 100 Community Health Workers in Senegal within two years time. This will be done in close collaboration with French NGO RAES. Telecom provider Orange offers technical support.

The grant that IICD's community health programme in Mali received was selected out of many applications, together with seven others. The grant is an initiative of the mHealth Alliance, a global project founded by the United Nations Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Vodafone Foundation, and the UN’s Innovation Working Group.

(Source: IICD)

Monday, October 08, 2012 8:20:45 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, September 21, 2012
At Sengerema hospital, patients coming in for small treatments in the so called ‘outpatient’ department were often confronted with many difficulties. First of all, it was difficult to register as a returning patient because patient files were stored manually and it took quite some time, before a file was found. The digital system will also solve the problem of long tiring standing queues where patients were often pushing each other in order to get served first. With a new patient registration system in place, patients can wait to be called while sitting comfortably on a bench.

Moving to digital hospital management took some time. In the first phase, with the support of IICD, some key staff was trained and computers were already partially used in the administration office to for instance create schedules for nurses and computers were placed in an Internet café in the hospital. This allowed staff to already get familiar with computers. Then about 2 months before introducing the Hospital Management Information System (HMIS), 40 staff members were trained for 2 weeks in a basic ICT training that was focused on getting to know the system in simple way.

In addition to the reduced waiting time, another benefit for patients is that they now know better what they pay for. As there was not a general price list, pharmacists often worked with estimated prices. This meant that it differed what you had to pay depending on which pharmacist you would get. With the digital system, errors are virtually impossible. All products are priced in the system and patients now get digital receipts with the exact amounts.

For the hospital, the digital system also has financial benefits. Of course it costs money to implement, but it also raises money. The hospitals had to deal with patients not paying for their treatment and medicine, because of poor communication between the registering office, the lab, the pharmacy and the billing department or simply because of a hurry.  This lost the hospital a significant amount of money every day that could have been used for new hospital equipment or hiring specialists.

Now, it’s not possible for a patient to walk out without paying anymore. The doctor orders a certain medicine from the pharmacy for a patient digitally and then the billing department gets the information about how much this medication costs. Only after the patient paid the amount for medication and doctor treatment, will the computer system allow patients to pick up their medicines.

The system is cost- and energy efficient by using Ncomputing hardware. The big advantage of this virtual desktop solution is that multiple computer screens and keyboards are able to run on one computer. This makes the system very energy efficient and does not require a lot of maintenance.

(Source: IICD)
Further details


Friday, September 21, 2012 1:51:17 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, August 31, 2012

With the socialization of public policies and experiences in telehealth and medicine in the ICT sector, the ICT Ministry participated in the Third International Telemedicine Conference where over 150 representatives of the health sector met to discuss technology and health.

The event, organized by the Center for Telemedicine in Colombia, with the participation of national and international experts in the field of telemedicine, telehealth and e-health held various  academic sessions such as workshops, lectures, courses and specialized tradeshow to showcase advances in telemedicine industry.

"With the development of telemedicine in Colombia we are saving lives, professionals in Health have increasingly tools to practice, making that all people receive timely medical care and quality, regardless of where they are, all this thanks to the opportunities offered by today's technology "said Johanna Pimiento, Manager of the Program e-Government, who participated in the first day of the Conference.
ICT Ministry and telehealth.

Since Act 1419 of 2010, which establishes guidelines for the development of telehealth in Colombia and its development; which aims to support the Social Security System in Health on principles of efficiency, universality, solidarity, integrity , unity and quality telehealth as public policy seeks to improve through technology, health conditions of the Colombian population, particularly the ones who are socially and economically vulnerable, finding themselves in places difficult to access and out of reach from the health institutions of medium and high complexity.

With the implementation of the Plan “Vive Digital” from the ICT Ministry, which seeks to promote the massive use of the Internet to make a leap to prosperity for all, through the program “Compartel” and its National Fiber Optic, connection will be provided to 780 IPS across the country and is currently in the process of shaping the Telehealth Committee, which will promote the conditions for telehealth develop effectively in the country.

(Source:MINTIC – Colombia)

Friday, August 31, 2012 8:50:11 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, July 25, 2012

The key to a successful use of eHealth is that it should lead to a lasting and substantial improvement of performance. Experience teaches that a participatory design approach is required when using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and when designing health solutions. This creates a momentum for change. However, health facilities are often complex organizations and we learned that to create continuous and lasting change, explicit attention is required to the on-going process of organizational change. The momentum for change should be transformed in a pathway. IICD and its partners in Tanzania developed a practical and integrated approach that scaffolds health management information systems, telemedicine and e-learning in one integrated approach called the eHealth package, which has relevance worldwide.

The eHealth package is applied in the Lake Zone in Tanzania. It is embedded in a district approach to ensure a more conducive institutional and financial setting. Organizational and institutional issues proved to be key obstacles in applying ICT in health. Therefore the district approach is closely related to the national eHealth strategy. The strength of the eHealth package compared to other eHealth solutions is the integration of all aspects; technical, medical, financial, learning, behavioural change etc. in a flexible road map of best practices for eHealth implementation at a health facility.

(Source: IICD)
See the Full Report


Wednesday, July 25, 2012 9:28:13 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, July 03, 2012

Experts at eLearning Africa 2011 suggested that eLearning could bridge the alarming skills gap that exists between nurses trained in different disciplines. Some pointed to successful partnerships with NGOs in East Africa. Others discussed scale and replicability in African medical training.

The question of content and related issues including information access and development was a key theme of the session ‘What contribution can eLearning make towards confronting the skills challenge of Africa’s health sector?’

Mohamed Labib discussed HSO.info, a well-resourced website with expert free health sciences information. The vision is to make this relevant and available to all health workers. The importance of partnerships was noted here, both south-south and north-south. The example provided was the University Teaching Hospital in Zambia, partnering with the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.

The session included two presentations from the Tanzanian Training Centre for International Health (TTCIH). Angelo Nyamtema pointed out the severe shortage of healthcare workers in Tanzania and discussed the progress being made in developing an eLearning training programme, including their approach to pedagogical design and course structuring.

Diana Mukami discussed the African Medical and Research Foundation’s successful nurse upgrading programme via eLearning. Since its inception nearly six years ago, the programme – a classic public-private partnership – has enrolled 7000 nurses across 108 eCentres in Kenya and graduated over 2000 nurses. It comprises General Nursing, Reproductive Health, Community Health and Specialised Areas.

(Source: eLearning Africa)
Further details


Tuesday, July 03, 2012 5:45:57 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, June 06, 2012
Over 50 Africans and Latin Americans gathered in Bolivia and Uganda to share their experiences with using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for education and health. These Cross-Country Learning Events (CCLEs) took place from 21 to 26 May 2012 and were organized by IICD and its Connect4Change consortium partners.

In Bolivia, African and Latin American participants deliberated on the theme ‘Improving the quality and equity of Education through integrating ICT’ and in Uganda partners shared their experiences and lessons on ‘ICT in health’.

The meeting objectives of the CCLEs in Uganda and Bolivia were:

   - Active learning on what works and what does not in using ICTs to enhance the quality of health and education
   - Sharing of innovative ideas and peer advice, and identification of good practices
   - Linking and networking among individuals, projects and organisations working in this field
   - Building on participants’ experiences to inform C4C´s practice and programmes

 The cross-country learning event in Bolivia, hosted by CEPAC was officially opened on by CEPAC’s Managing Director Widen Abastoflor Sauma. In his opening speech, he emphasised that ‘the power to learn is within the human being’.  With these words in mind, participants actively commenced the workshops sessions aimed at sharing knowledge and experiences.

The programme also included project visits to schools that are successfully using ICT for improved learning. For many participants these visits led to new insights. Stephan Agbenyo from Ghana vitited a school in Yapacani that is generating and digitising its own content. On his blog, he writes that he is impressed about “the special involvement of parents in the projects and the integration of technology in the classroom.”

In Uganda, a similar programme was followed and participants from all over Africa shared their stories on how ICTs are used to improve health care delivery in Africa. Christopher Kulanga from the Nkhoma Hospital in Malawi said: “The interaction, the sharing is just amazing. There are stories that are so inspiring and motivating. They give me the driving force”.

(Source: IICD)

Further details

Wednesday, June 06, 2012 3:44:32 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, May 31, 2012

Three hospitals in the towns of Saboba, Wiaga and Bawku in Northern Ghana, are setting up an upgraded health information system, customised to fit their specific needs. The system can help to increase the hospitals efficiency giving more insight into patients registrations, help to more easily keep track of pharmacy stock and more.

The system contains several components that will each help different areas of the hospital.

  • Clinical: Patients records and registrations, prescriptions, admissions and discharges, investigations (x-rays, laboratory, ultrasound scans etc.) and daily measurements.

  • Stock and Inventory Management: Pharmacies, stocks and dispensaries, procurements, external orders and receivables.

  • Human Resource: Managing staff, payroll, promotions and appraisals, recruitment and leave of absence.

  • Income and Expenditure: Invoicing and billing, sponsors and patients invoicing, refunds and deposit payments.

  • General Reports: Daily attendance, patient registrations, services and their fees, drugs bulletin, clinics, inpatient and outpatient listing as well as medical sponsors.

The system will also provide the Ghanaian Ministry of Health with data concerning mortality, morbidity, outpatients and inpatients, midwife returns, surgical returns and bed state statistics. Local partner CHAG will also have the opportunity to monitor and compare the data from these hospitals in real time.

This health information system will be up-scaled with the financial, technical and training support of IICD and Cordaid, working as members of the Connect4Change Consortium.
It will be customised based on an already available system, HAMS, created by Ghanaian organization Infotech.

HAMS is already being applied in more than 100 hospitals all over the country. The system provides a valuable source of medical, financial,administrative, human resources and insurance data. In addition, it is linked to DHIS2, the central public health monitoring system where information on all the hospitals in Ghana is accessible at all times.

(Source: IICD)
Further details


Thursday, May 31, 2012 4:13:54 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Inspired by the Haiti earthquake disaster in 2010, the idea of Health eVillages came about when Donato Tramuto, Health eVillages’ co-founder and CEO of Physicians Interactive, and Kerry Kennedy, founder of the Washington D.C. based Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, were discussing ideas about what they could do to help the victims.

Launched in Sep 26, 2011 as a partnership between Physician’s Interactive Holdings, its subsidiary Skyscape.com, Inc. and the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, Health eVillages seeks to provide healthcare professionals working in challenging clinical environments with medical decision making, clinical diagnosis and training tools in easy-to-use mobile devices.

New and refurbished mobile phones and handheld devices (like iPads) are preloaded with clinical decision support reference tools like patient records, drug guides, textbooks and related medical data. These devices, which do not require web access, are given to clinical and healthcare workers to ensure that they always have medical information available. Besides medical alerts, the devices support access to references from over 50 medical publisher resources powered by Skyscape.com, Inc.

Nurses and clinicians in Haiti, Kenya, Uganda and the Greater Gulf Coast area of the Southern United States have received these devices. “Health eVillages arm clinicians with a ‘gold standard’ medical reference tool-kit, so they are prepared for any situation and are able to properly treat even the most unique medical conditions. [In] most of the areas where these mobile devices have been given, people don’t have access to basic electricity let alone the most advanced medical treatment,” said Tramuto.

He added: “These devices enable them to identify the right dose, identify a condition or seek the latest research in a particular area. For each country we customize the software. In Haiti we have programs specific to nurses diagnosing a disease or condition particular to Haiti. The drug and dosage information is monitored accordingly.  Patient details can be entered in as well. Now there is no need to run around looking for information either about a patient or a condition”.

Using donated and refurbished phones, the project works very closely with medical officers and leaders of target communities to ensure that information is completely customized and specific to their area.

Health eVillages identifies clinics through partners and associates of the Robert F. Kennedy Center and Physician’s Interactive Holdings. Staff members from the project are sent to locations with specific programs most often requested by the medical personnel in the area.

They have seven pilot projects running and early data points shows that medical personnel rate their data finding methods very helpful. “We hope to raise more funds after the competition of our pilot projects”, said Tramuto. Health eVillages clearly has big plans for the future of mobile health technology.

(Source: AudienceScapes)
Further details


Tuesday, April 24, 2012 5:08:37 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Patients of Singapore’s National Skin Centre (NSC) can now have an access to their treatment records and communicate with their healthcare team from homes.

The NSC today launched its online Patient Health Portal, the first for a health institution in Singapore, and possibly in Asia that will enable patients to conduct a variety of tasks related to their treatments, said Dr Steven Thng, consultant at the National Skin Centre.

The benefit includes corresponding with the healthcare team via email about medication, treatment and procedure queries”, he said.

Patients will also be connected to more information concerning their medical condition.

According to him, the NSC has more than one hundred people signing on this free service since it was piloted late last year.

In term of confidentiality, Dr Thng said that patients do not need to worry as they are required to use a secured password to log onto the website.

The NSC is a public tertiary-care institute that provides specialized dermatological services, trains and educates both medical students and post-graduate trainees.

(Source: FutureGov)
Further details


Wednesday, April 18, 2012 10:54:13 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, April 09, 2012

With a staff of approximately 6000, Barwon Health is one of the largest and most comprehensive regional health services in the Australian State of Victoria. Having successfully reduced the elective surgery waiting list, improved Emergency Department wait times and finished last year with a budget surplus, last November Barwon Health was named “regional health service of the year”.

According to CIO Ann Larkins, Barwon Health’s ehealth journey began around 2005, the success of which she ascribes to their strategy of agile development, “our approach has been about incremental developments rather than a big bang”.

Having started with a basic system that provided pathology results online, this has been gradually developed in stages to now provide everything offered by the larger ehealth software providers including digital medical records, medications management, electronic messaging to GPs via Health Level Seven. “It has become a complete one stop shop clinical system” says Larkins, “not too dissimilar to some of your bigger companies … the product that we are using has evolved from a much smaller base but with much more of our input into it along the way”.

The benefit of this development methodology is that, “it is a much more agile way to respond to the requests of clinicians whereas some of the less responsive big companies find that difficult and challenging. We’ve achieved a lot in a small time with small agile developments”.

This has allowed for department specific systems be either integrated with or developed within the main clinical system. “We respect the needs of different departments to have their own system where there is need for them, but where there’s functionality already existing we pull them into the core”.

(Source: FutureGov)
Further details


Monday, April 09, 2012 10:57:20 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, March 21, 2012

South Africa is leading the way in launching mobile health (mHealth) services with some of the most successful and best known mHealth initiatives having been developed in this country. This is according to Andrea Monteiro, director of Mobile Health Africa, which will gather the leading minds in the industry in Johannesburg in May.

“Africa suffers more than 24% of the global burden of disease”, says Andrea, “but has an average of only two doctors per 10,000 people – a shocking statistic. It means that providing the majority of people in Africa with healthcare is a major challenge”. She says the evolution of mHealth services in Africa is enabling the drastic improvement of the healthcare infrastructure: “In its most basic form it will provide access to healthcare advice and information even in the most remote parts Africa”.

According to the Mobile Health Africa director, South Africa represents the ideal platform for the deployment and evolution of mHealth services. She explains: “The country has a brilliant telecoms infrastructure, both in terms of service provisioning and technology and is home to several entrepreneurial NGOs currently investing in mobile technologies. On a social level, mobile penetration rates are very high, and other mobile services such as mobile money/mobile banking are already well established and used successfully on a day-to-day basis”.

The objective is to evolve pilots to successful live mHealth deployments. Mobile Health Africa 2012 will provide the perfect platform for the establishment of the business models and partnerships needed to build sustainable and scalable mHealth services throughout Africa. The event will feature presentations from organizations and companies that are leading the development of mHealth initiatives on the continent.

Mobile Health Africa 2012 is part of the Connected Africa Forum, which will showcase the evolution of mobile lifeline services and applications in Africa, and highlight the evolving intersection between mobile money, mobile health and mobile agriculture.

More details
(Source: PR. Com)


Wednesday, March 21, 2012 3:31:51 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Sunday, March 11, 2012
According to Pew Internet and American Life Project, 80 percent of adults gather health information online and 88 percent of American adults have a cell phone, and among the cell phone owners 53 percent own a smartphone. Read Original Content

The World Health Organization has calculated that mHealth adoption could reduce costs for elderly care by 25 percent, reduce maternal and perinatal mortality by 30 percent, and improve TB treatment compliance between 30 percent and 70 percent. Read Original Content

The significant adoption of smartphones among physicians has not only led to an explosion of medical apps aimed at healthcare providers, but it has also cultivated an emerging trend of health and wellness apps aimed at empowering patients. Check out these three new apps that empower patients. Read Original Content

Webalo technology eliminates the need for traditional mobile application development tools and custom programming to provide in hours, instead of weeks or months, mobile access to the specific enterprise data and functions that smartphone and tablet users rely on to do their jobs.  This newsletter is sponsored in part by Webalo, www.webalo.com.

 Clinical trials by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Flinders Medical Centre will assess the performance of the world-leading handheld ultrasound device engineered and manufactured by Adelaide company Signostics Limited. Read Original Content.

(Source: MobileEnterpriseStrategies)
More details

Sunday, March 11, 2012 4:43:21 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, March 06, 2012
The study identifies the main healthcare challenges in each study country, and estimates the potential benefits over the next decade of large-scale mHealth solutions being made available, leveraging the best evidence available on mHealth pilots to date. It also examines the roles stakeholders need to play to help make this a reality.

Based on the explosive growth in global mobile phone penetration, a technology revolution is quickly gaining pace in healthcare. Around the world, healthcare systems are overburdened, costly and incapable of meeting the needs of a growing population. According to a new study from The Boston Consulting Group and Telenor Group, mobile health technology can offer sizeable benefits to all countries, lead to economic growth and promise a better life for individuals.

The study "Socio-Economic Impact of mHealth " - commissioned by Telenor Group and carried out by The Boston Consulting Group - is a comprehensive survey of the impact that mHealth initiatives can have in 12 countries. What unites them all is that mobile health technology can improve the quality, reach and effectiveness of services while reducing costs and the overall system burden.

Telenor Group has launched a number of mobile health initiatives across its markets. In Norway, an assisted living project helps the elderly stay longer at home through mobile alarm systems. In Thailand, a mobile text messaging service provides epidemic surveillance. In Bangladesh and Pakistan, a service called Healthline provides patients with a simple number to dial for both serious and non-serious medical needs. In India, mothers can obtain critical information about prenatal health via their phones. In Montenegro, a joint project with the EU provides a service for remotely located elderly people, enabled by one touch on a button on their mobile handset. In Serbia, mobile health technology is used to increase the quality of medical registration and reporting for the Roma community.

Among the key findings:

  • The necessary infrastructure is already in everyone's hands: 7.4 billion mobile subscriptions projected by 2015

  • The technology richness and network capacity is sufficient, both on simple feature phones and on smart devices

  • Currently, more than 500 mobile health projects are taking place around the world

  • Costs in elderly care can be reduced by 25% with mobile healthcare

  • Maternal and perinatal mortality can be reduced by 30%

  • Twice as many rural patients can be reached per doctor

  • Tuberculosis treatment compliance can be improved by 30-70%

  • 30% of smartphone users are likely to use "wellness apps" by 2015

  • Costs related to data collection can be reduced by 24%

  • Smartphone is the most popular technology among doctors since the stethoscope

(Source: Reuters News)
Further details


Tuesday, March 06, 2012 5:04:24 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, February 27, 2012

Recent mobile phone initiatives in Bangladesh are allowing patients to reach a health worker for advice at no cost 24 hours a day, receive prenatal care reminders and even send complaints about patient care.

“It is difficult to manage doctors for [a national population of] 140 million people. We are using mobile phone service to bridge this treatment gap“, Abul Kalam Azad, a senior official at the Directorate General of Health Services, told IRIN.

Close to 60 percent of the population - some 85 million people - use mobile phones in Bangladesh, according to a December 2011 report from the country’s telecommunications regulatory commission.

Cut off from formal medical care, some patients turn to untrained or “fake” doctors, leading to fatal remedies, said Azad, who wants to counter this trend with sound health advice.

Since 2009, the government has provided cell phones to 482 sub-district and district government hospitals, which are used as round-the-clock hotlines staffed by health workers.

Nationwide there is one doctor for every 3,200 residents and one hospital bed for every 1,738 people, according to government data published in 2011.

While this proportion of doctors to residents exceeds the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended minimum of one doctor per 10,000 residents to ensure basic health services, the picture in rural areas is markedly different.

“There are many hard-to-reach areas where it is difficult for the people to quickly rush to the hospitals. These people are getting health advice by the mobile phone health service”, said Azad. The country is in the bottom 20 countries ranked by NGO Save the Children for health workers’ ability to reach patients in need.

(Source: IRIN News)
Furhter details




Monday, February 27, 2012 10:50:12 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

WARID and Orange Uganda have joined the Mobile Money network to offer money transfer services to their clients. MTN's Mobile money and UTL's M-Sente are already in operation with DSTV, Umeme, NWSC among others using this service for customers to settle their bills.

At Case Clinic for example, you clearly see a notice displayed at the payment point that they accept mobile money payments. This can be helpful in a number of ways, assuming you are short on cash of course as you did not know the cost of the drugs coupled with the consultation fee, you could go ahead and call up a friend to bail you out by sending the money to your phone so that the medical bills can be settled.

Not so many people might be embracing it now but it will be a matter of time before this becomes a way of life though problems like load shedding can easily affect you if you do not charge your mobile phone.

To access your account which in this case is your mobile phone, it must be on. To receive money as well, the phone must be on because unlike SMS that can be delivered when the phone is switched on, you must use a service centre to retrieve mobile money messages.

(Source: Uganda Online)
Further details

Monday, February 27, 2012 8:41:31 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, February 16, 2012

The program “Padrino Tecnológico” has been introduced in the University of Alcala de Henares as part of the activities of CAPTA II, organized by the Chair for the Improvement of Personal Autonomy of Telefonica, which objective is the research, development, education and outreach to strengthen technologies such as "Internet of Things" and increase personal autonomy of certain groups (Disabled people, elderly, sick people ...).

The initiative has as protagonists to the "sponsors", volunteers who spend time for designing and developing ICT solutions for children with motor and / or cognitive high impairment. It also has the involvement of the University students as potential entrepreneurs, who could use the existing market niche around disability, who are nearly 1,000 million people worldwide.

Also concerning to the accessibility, experts from the National Center of Techniques Accessibility (CENTAC), the Polytechnic University of Madrid, and Telefónica, which participated in the conference, wanted to highlight the key issue that services based on “Internet of Things” will be viable and accessible for all society: design but taking into account all people, whatever their capabilities, making them affordable; paying attention in the security and privacy of data, taking advantage of them, and promoting digital literacy for easy using.

But “Internet of Things” is not only key for the inclusion in the society of people with disabilities, but also constitutes an industrial sector to develop, which may contribute to the sustainability of Health, for example, by telecare solutions for the chronically ill and to seek a healthy aging (keep in mind that at 2050, 30% of the Spanish population will be more than 80 years old).

At the meeting, attended by over 100 people, also they stressed the benefits of smart cities or smartcities. So, Javier Vizcaino, manager of Public Administrations of Telefónica for the Centre Territory, explained that these smart cities provide suitable information to public managers, so they can take better decisions, make easy the participation of citizens, promote efficiency in the use of energy resources, and improve accessibility.

(Source: Telefonica –España)
Further details


Thursday, February 16, 2012 10:42:09 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, February 08, 2012
The Australian government’s high-speed, fast-access broadband communications program will deliver health care services to older Australians, people living with cancer, and those needing palliative care.

The national broadband network (NBN) telehealth pilot program will more readily connect healthcare providers with patients, especially in regional, rural and outer metropolita areas. A telehealth pilot is being trialled in an area of NBN coverage – with first round of services to be operational by July 2012.

Australia’s telehealth services are supported by the $36 billion (US$38 billion) NBN roll-out, offering affordable broadband to homes, doctor surgeries, pharmacies, clinics, aged-care facilities and allied health professionals. Telehealth services remove many of the barriers, such as Australia’s “tyranny of distance,” as well as managing the time and cost involved in patients visiting healthcare providers or GPs.

These broadband-supported services, when fully operational, will transform the way healthcare is delivered nationally – while streamlining service delivery for groups in most need.

Senator Stephen Conroy, minister for broadband, communications and the digital economy, says telehealth will transform health care delivery in Australia. This trial will make a real difference to the lives of patients with high health care needs living in NBN early rollout areas, particularly those in regional, rural, remote and outer metropolitan areas”, he says.

With an aging population, the Australian government seeks to maximize the reach of health care services, while proactively managing medical conditions.

Existing Telehealth services are popular with patients and doctors, making it make easier for people to receive care and consultation through videoconferencing, as and when needed.

Six months after introducing Medicare rebates for telehealth consultations, the uptake has grown steadily – with more than 7,000 services provided by over 1,200 clinicians nationally, mostly to rural and remote areas.

(Source: FutureGov)
Further details

Wednesday, February 08, 2012 11:45:13 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Recently, Merck Sharp & Dohme (MSD) Peru launched via Facebook, a useful source of information for women: "Being a Woman", which has the objective to inform women on what it means to be female. There is possible to find the answers to frequently asked questions that are commonly performed by women, thinking of their benefits, health and beauty, among other interesting topics.

To answer all kinds of inquiries with regard to women, it will be available a health specialist about sexuality. The expert also will absolve consultations on contraception, menopause, fertility, among other subjects that the visitors of the page are interested on. In addition it will provide tips and contests via this popular social network. In this regard Dr. Monica Naranjo Cáceres, gynecology specialist, said that this is important means of informing our female population, starting obviously with the teenagers and covers all women of childbearing age, to enjoy a full sex life and a personal. The link is www.facebook.com/sermujer.pe

"Women today should be better informed and know more about what it means to be a woman", noted the specialist.

(Source: Perumagazin)

Further details

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:28:24 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, January 04, 2012
For the very first time in Sri Lanka, doctors in government hospitals will be able view a patient’s comprehensive medical records on their computer screen, all thanks to the newly developed Hospital Health Information Management System (HHIMS).

The HHIMS is a joint collaborative effort between the ICT agency of Sri Lanka (ICTA) and the Ministry of Health. The initiative stemmed from the Government’s thrust to significantly improve service delivery to the citizens by using ICT.

According to Wasantha Deshapriya, ICTA Re-engineering Government Programme Director, the software has been tested in five hospitals – Karavanella, Mawanella, Endegoda, Kitugala, and Deriyanagala – in the Kegalle District for over six months. At present, it is now ready to be installed in other Government hospitals island-wide.

The Hospital Health Information Management System, is a free open source software that will enable doctors make accurate and well-informed diagnosis on their patients
By simply having a registration number, the hospital staff will dispense medication and carry out tests as per the doctor’s ‘prescription’ which is documented on the electronic patient record available to them on their computer screens.

“This user-friendly software enables accurate diagnosis and will be crucial in helping government hospitals go paperless. In addition, it also facilitates the production of many routine but essential hospital reports thus saving time and much paperwork. A positive indirect effect of the system is that the medical staff has more time to attend to their patients”, Deshapriya said.

(Source: FutureGov)
Further details

Wednesday, January 04, 2012 9:45:10 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, December 26, 2011
A project that connects, by a computer, the Hospital of Yurimaguas with three health centers located in the heart of Alto Amazonas, Loreto, improved the services level, prevented deaths and made more efficient medical work in this area of the country. This initiative has just been awarded by Telefónica as one of the best enterprises in rural areas in 2011.

Last Friday, a young woman from the community of Nuevo Junín came to the Medical Center of Balsapuerto District, Alto Amazonas, for a medical emergency. She had twin pregnancy, but the kids were in a position that made it difficult to delivery. A doctor assessed it, but also made consultation with an obstetrician in Yurimaguas Hospital, 60 kilometers far, through a computer communication system that makes it possible to see the patient on the screen and assess the severity of the case. It was decided that a small plane departed from Yurimaguas go to pick up the women and bring her to the city. She took an operation and saved her life and from their two children.

Maybe without the system that makes possible to see online the patient and give her a diagnosis, would not been so fast and could not manage it quickly the fly of a plane through the Health Integral System (SIS). The pregnant woman came to Yurimaguas in less than an hour from the depths of the Amazon. Otherwise she should have to travel by river boat about six hours, with the risk of dying in the road.

The project that has made it possible to act with such efficiency is called "Telemedicine Network in health" and weeks ago won an award as one of the best enterprises in rural communication, 2011. What is? The Department of Health from Alto Amazon has interconnected via audio and video its administrative headquarters in Santa Gema in Yurimaguas hospital, with the health center of Balsapuerto district, and the communities of San Gabriel and San Juan de Varadero Armanayacu, forest locations with problems of lack of basic services, poverty and disease.

Dr. Georgina Valentin, head of Alto Amazon DISA is the coordinator of this project that has managed to "diagnose serious cases away and prevent many deaths". This health centers have a computer, WiFi connection, a transmission antenna almost 60 feet high and solar panels that make it possible to have energy where there are no electrical connections. The system is similar to Skype, but it is a network that only works between sites connected. If the doctor of this network have questions about a case, can consult with a specialist hospital in Yurimaguas though a video call.

(Source: La Republica Newspaper)
Further details

Monday, December 26, 2011 11:58:26 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, December 20, 2011

The award "Connected to Grow," seeks to identify and recognize best efforts developed in rural areas of the country, which have had social and economic impact in their residents and / or communities using telecommunications as a base, said Alvaro Valdez Fernandez Baca, Director of Communications, Image and Corporate Responsibility of Telefónica.

"We are very pleased with the results of this contest which confirm that ICT is an important tool to accelerate the development of peoples and enhance the skills and talent of rural entrepreneurs, enabling them to improve the quality of their crops, implementing new business and make more informed people, to improve their life standard and its environment", said Valdez Fernandez Baca.

The winners, chosen from 23 finalists, received stimuli for a total of S /. 60,000 (US$ aprox. 20,000), as well as the latest laptops generation.

First place prize went to the Rural Tourism Association Solidario (ASTURS) from Capachica (Puno), represented by Walter Pancca Paucar. This is about an experiential tourism project, which has improved the lives of 75 families of 9 communities with microcredit and straightening abilities, from ICT and development of solidarity with tourist travel. This initiative has the support of the Departs associations and Culture Contact in France.

The second place went to the project "Telemedicine in health" which was presented by Dr. Georgina Valentin Rojas. This initiative developed in the community of Balsapuerto (Loreto) is important because have successfully implemented telemedicine from a wireless network for voice and data interfaces to 11 health facilities, decreasing mortality and disease epidemiology.

Finally, Commander Trinidad Wilbert Callapiña Durand, was awarded third place on behalf of the Police Division Acomayo (Cusco), the project has allowed this division to be trained in the use of ICT and improve their operation in the program "Willay" from a telecommunications network that provides a dial-up Internet access point that comes through repeater stations installed in strategic areas.

It was also awarded the "Special Award Living Testimony" to the five best stories of life of people who stood out among 37 witnesses, who have benefited with the use of ICT in their communities.

(Source: Telefonica del Peru)
Further details


Tuesday, December 20, 2011 4:36:11 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, December 13, 2011

The United Nations’ technology body, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), is calling for a wider use of technology projects in helping countries adapt to climate change.

At the Durban Summit last week, the ITU released a study focusing on how an ICT project allowed Ghana’s cocoa industry to become more resilient to the effects of climate change. The ITU said Ghana’s case should set an example for other developing countries.

The study focuses on how ICT can be used in optimising production by, for example, sharing information in real time between producers and end users, said Dr Bilel Jamoussi, chief of the ITU’s Study Groups department, in an interview with Business Green.

He said ICT has, in general, been overlooked as a tool for helping developing countries adapt, and that Ghana’s case demonstrates the value that these countries can find in technology projects.

It’s a really good sign that these countries are seeing how they can adapt”, he said. “These countries are not always big producers of greenhouse gases, but they are the most affected [by climate change]”.

The ITU believes that ICT has in general been overlooked as a way of helping stem climate change and to adapt to its effects, Jamoussi said.

Our key goal is that ICT is viewed as an enabler and plays a central role in adaptation and mitigation”, Jamoussi told Business Green. “Our report and recommendations are a concrete example of that”.

As part of its wider support of ICT’s role in mitigating climate change, the ITU has created a set of standardized methodologies for assessing the impact of ICT on the environment, and has participated in other initiatives such as the development of a standardized, energy-efficient mobile phone charger.

The ITU gave its approval for the concept for a universal phone charger in 2009, with the aim of drastically reducing the number of chargers produced, shipped and subsequently discarded as new models become available.

(Source: eweekerope)
Further details


Tuesday, December 13, 2011 9:28:09 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, December 12, 2011

Health minister Onybeuchi Chukwu says Nigeria must begin deploying information and communication technology (ICT) in health delivery but insists it must be driven by "a policy that's coherent, but more importantly implementable".

A national conference looking at deploying information and communication technology has opened in Abuja.

Declaring it open, the minister said stakeholders must galvanise "action toward ensuring ICT is employed in the best manner that will help to drive the health sector toward" targets set in the National Health Development Plan.

"Our traditional ways of doing things can no longer be considered sufficient", he said.

Among new technologies in medicine is mobile health, which allows the public get health information on their mobile phones.

But the minister noted there were plans to replace old plastic syringes with automatic ones next year.

He stressed that deploying ICT in health could open up innovative ways to drive down the cost of healthcare, improve education and training programmes, accessibility and reliability of medical records. It could also make disease control more efficient, Chukwu noted.

The health ministry is coordinating with both the ministries of communications technology as well as science and technology.

Science and technology ministry has already launched a telemedicine project in Lagos, according to the minister, Prof Ita Okon Bassey Ewa, noting that a vibrant IT system could give a health sector "that responds to needs".

Dr Andrew Mbewe of the World Health Organisation said Nigeria needed to institute a national coordinating mechanism for various e-health systems, coordinate investments in e-health and health information systems from donors and partners as well as assess appropriate policies at all levels.

(Source: AllAfrica News)
Further details

Monday, December 12, 2011 5:17:12 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, December 05, 2011

A Kenyan is among two innovators awarded $250,000 (approximately Sh25,000,000) to develop pre-natal care solutions.

Two projects, one using cell phones to deliver to expectant mothers in Kenya electronic vouchers for pre-natal care and transportation, the other aimed at promoting maternal and child health in northern Nigeria, will receive $250,000 grants from the Saving Lives at Birth Partnership.

Both projects were motivated by the childbirth-related deaths of important women in the lives of the African-based project innovators.

Although Kenyan Sam Agutu and Nigerian Aminu Gamawa come from different countries and backgrounds, they share a common passionate commitment - to save the lives of women giving birth and guarantee infants a healthy start.

Agutu's sister died in childbirth on the way to the hospital. Gamawa's mother died in childbirth too. Both men say the deaths were avoidable if better care had been available. They've channeled that devastating loss into powerful motivation to improve the odds for women and their babies.

Sam Agutu's Kenyan group, Changamka Microhealth based in Nairobi, is proposing e-vouchers delivered through cell phones to encourage women to seek care during their pregnancy and at birth.

In remote areas health care costs and distance to clinics are barriers for women. The e-vouchers can be used to pay for pre-natal care and transportation.

"Research shows that not receiving adequate care is a leading cause of maternal mortality in the developing world. Mothers who attend their required ante-natal visits and who deliver in hospital stand an infinitely greater chance of surviving than those who do not" said Mr. Agutu. "We will use Saving Lives at Birth's support to validate the effectiveness of e-vouchers, an SMS informational campaign and a transport subsidy in encouraging pregnant women to seek health care".

The Development Research and Projects Centre in Nigeria is relying on persuasion and experience to change attitudes of some Islamic opinion leaders in the country's Muslim northern states.

Each program will receive a $250,000 seed grant from the Saving Lives at Birth partnership, which includes Grand Challenges Canada, USAID, the Government of Norway, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Bank.

(Source: Business daily Africa)
Further details


Monday, December 05, 2011 9:20:16 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Josh Nesbit was a student at Stanford University preparing for medical school, when two conversations with a doctor and a community health worker in Malawi changed the course of his life.

I was doing HIV research at a clinic in Malawi, in 2007, when I met a doctor who was covering a catchment area of 100,000 people single-handedly, and a community health worker who walked 35 miles to the hospital each week to hand-deliver patient reports”, said Nesbit. But he also realized that he had a better mobile signal at that community health worker's home than he did in Palo Alto, California. It became clear to him that this new mobile infrastructure could be harnessed to bridge gaps and coordinate health care services.

Inspired by volunteer village health workers in rural Malawi, Medic Mobile was launched in 2009 by Josh Nesbit and three co-founders while they were still students. According to the organization's website, Medic Mobile develops technologies such as easy-to-use medical record systems and SIM card applications to help health workers communicate and coordinate patient care, and provide diagnostics using low-cost mobile technology. Medic Mobile believes that well-coordinated and connected health systems can save lives.

In June 2011, they announced the first SIM card application for health care, created with support from The Maternal Health Task Force and PSI. These applications run on any GSM device, from the simplest US$15 handsets to smart phones. Using SIM apps, they plan to bring structured information exchange to the “last mile”, supporting health workers and patients. Today, Mobile Medic has over 30 partnerships in 15 countries to improve health care delivery in extremely resource poor conditions.

An article on the website of Global Pulse, the international health journal of the American Medical Student Association, cites World Health Organization (WHO) estimates a shortfall of 4.3 million health care workers in the developing world. Medic Mobile believes that the intelligent deployment of mobile technology can help improve access and outcomes, even with this lack of health professionals.

Mobile Media now works with more than 30 international and local partners. The group has established programs in 70% of Malawi’s districts and implemented projects in twelve countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The results continued - drug stock reporting improved from less than 35% to over 80% across 10 districts in Malawi, costs decreased four times and efficiency increased 112 times for community-level treatment support.

(Source: AudienceScapes)
Further details



Monday, December 05, 2011 4:24:47 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, November 02, 2011
Pakistan is experimenting with a relatively new model of healthcare delivery: telemedicine. For distance-based medical services to be successful, however, projects must grapple with challenges like inadequate infrastructure and patient distrust of the concept.

In the 10 months since the organization TeleSehat opened a second pilot telemedicine center in the Pakistani city of Gujar Khan, more than 3,000 patients have been treated. Such numbers point to the great potential of telemedicine to bridge the healthcare divide in Pakistan.

Due to an insufficient healthcare budget, a shortage of good doctors, and poor, ill-equipped public hospitals, Pakistan is unable to provide all its citizens with even basic healthcare services. Given the sheer lack of healthcare facilities in remote villages, villagers suffering with serious illnesses and health emergencies often have no other option but to travel extensive distances into the main cities. As the cost of traveling is prohibitive for many who survive on meager incomes, these villagers either rack up great debts or forego medical attention entirely.

Closing the healthcare gap between those who live near medical facilities and those who do not was the impetus behind TeleSehat (‘Sehat’ is Urdu for ‘Health’). Asad Karim (also the CEO of a local technology firm, Comcept) and Syed Mahmood Hussain launched TeleSehat in the summer of 2008. They founded the organization to establish telemedicine centers to deliver healthcare to Pakistanis living in inaccessible locations.

Telemedicine is not a completely new concept to Pakistan, and certain projects have been quite noteworthy. Launched in 2001, the Tele-Health Programme, for instance, was the country’s first telemedicine initiative. Jaroka Tele-healthcare, Sehat First and TeleDoctor, all similar local telemedicine initiatives, soon followed.

But the question remains: Can telemedicine prove successful in a country like Pakistan?
“Telemedicine is the only hope for countries like Pakistan”, insists TeleSehat’s head of business development, Nabeel Ahmad Malik. “However, this can only prove successful if the service delivery model is designed in a way that it suits all the stakeholders, which includes hospitals, doctors, TeleSehat itself, the local population and the respective government”.

(Source: AudienceScapes)
Further details

Wednesday, November 02, 2011 11:45:16 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 25, 2011

His Majesty King Abdullah on Saturday stressed the importance of ICT tools in improving the quality of healthcare services.

Referring to the e-Health Programme “Hakeem” launched at Prince Hamzah Public Hospital on Friday, the King credited the successful implementation of the programme in part to Jordan’s broadband capacity.

He also acknowledged the support of Cisco Systems, noting that the company first came to Jordan in 2002 to help the Kingdom improve its education sector.

His Majesty made the remarks during a special roundtable session on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum meeting to inaugurate the first healthcare ICT taskforce, with the participation of Cisco executives and experts from local ICT companies.

Addressing the participants, King Abdullah noted that forming a healthcare ICT taskforce would help in empowering Jordan’s ICT companies and promoting them locally, regionally and internationally, in addition to providing job opportunities for Jordanians, and promoting and strengthening the country’s health services

Speaking at the opening of the session, Cisco Chairman and CEO John Chambers noted that the ICT sector in Jordan is witnessing impressive growth, pointing out that the number of ICT companies in the country grew from 20 in 2003 to 450 this year.

Meanwhile, Mohammad Tahboub, chairman of the Information Technology Association of Jordan-inj@j, noted that the taskforce will be focused on achieving multiple objectives, including rapidly replicating the Hakeem programme nationwide and positioning Jordan as a regional hub for ICT solutions in the healthcare sector.

The Healthcare ICT task force is an initiative of int@j, the King Abdullah Fund for Development, Cisco, and local partners.

Also at the roundtable session, the King presented Chambers with Al Hussein Decoration for Distinguished Contribution of the First Degree in recognition of his efforts to strengthen Jordan’s education and ICT sectors.

(Source: Jordan Times)
Further details


Tuesday, October 25, 2011 6:09:37 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, October 21, 2011
In line with the Declaration of the Alma-Ata in 1978 which highlights health as the most important “world-wide social good” and the United Nations 2000 Declaration of the Millennium Development Goals, Nigeria has been striving to harness its resources to achieve efficient and functional healthcare for its people.

Specifically, the National Primary Healthcare Development Agency, an agency under the Health Ministry in Nigeria responsible for development and strengthening of primary healthcare nationwide, was formed to support the promotion and sustainability of high quality primary healthcare system and achieve the Millennium Development Goals relating to the health sector.

Alongside efforts by the World Health Organization and the various UN agencies that deal with health-related issues to improve the healthcare delivery system, concerted efforts are being made to reduce the differential access to technology of the developed and the developing world.

It is at the convergence of health and technology that eHealth initiatives evolved, creating an unprecedented opportunity to improve access to services and innovations. So what is the way out? Enter the mobile health (mHealth) initiative.

Stakeholders at a recent mobile health (mHealth) workshop put together by MTN Nigeria, voted in favor of adoption of the mobile healthcare system. Already, a United Nations report notes that this system has capacity to help meet four of the eight Millennium Development Goals, MDGs. Basically, mHealth broadly encompasses the use of mobile telecommunications devices and multimedia technologies as they are integrated within increasingly mobile and wireless healthcare delivery system.

In order words, it is the practice of medical and public healthcare supported by a mobile device, including the use of voice, data and SMS. By adopting mHealth in the healthcare delivery system, many more people, will potentially be reached and the health of the people and communities will be greatly enhanced.

This approach is particularly important due to the rapid adoption of mobile phone technology in developing countries. While mHealth has matured in industrialised nations, the field is still evolving in a developing country such as Nigeria. But argument for it is strong. As mobile technology grows, more and more people acquire mobile phones and other mobile devices, making them part of their everyday lives.

It then becomes easier for medical personnel to interact with them and provide health services, obtain health information to aid their researches and make it easy for them to provide the right medical solutions to health challenges in remote locations.

(Source: Vanguard NewsPaper)
Further details


Thursday, October 20, 2011 11:06:16 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, September 14, 2011

In less than two years, the South African AIDS-education project Young Africa Live is engaging hundreds of thousands of young people in sensitive discussions about love, sex and HIV/AIDS. Earlier this summer, the project released findings from its “Youth Sex Survey”, unprecedented in both size and content. The survey, conducted on the mobile platform that is the centerpiece of Young Africa Live, pulls back the curtain on what young South Africans think about crucial issues affecting their sexual health.

The Young Africa Live survey received more than 130,000 responses from the mobile platform’s users, the majority of whom are between 16 and 24. Findings included a high percentage (44 percent) of South African youth admitting they are sexually active at the same time that they are significantly concerned about HIV/AIDS – 81 percent of respondents indicated they equate “not telling a sexual partner that you carry the virus” with outright murder. In good news for the government’s promotion of circumcision as part of an overall HIV prevention program, a huge number of females – 78 percent -- stated that they prefer a circumcised partner.

Young Africa Live included some superficial questions in the poll, like whether guys and girls can be “just friends”. Placing serious and entertaining content side by side is the content formula Young Africa Live employs across its mobile platform – a combination that has proved successful for building an audience of more than 400,00 active users.

Young Africa Live’s founding organization, the Praekelt Foundation, didn’t want to brand the project as an “AIDS portal”. They avoided explicitly describing the platform as related to AIDS because of the stigma associated with the disease and the fact that many South Africans, particularly those who do not know their HIV-status, may not identify with that label.  “Our approach is not to preach, but to allow discussion, dialogue and community support”, says Marcha Neethling, Head of Operations for Praekelt.

The concept for Young Africa Live evolved from the recognition that South African youth are becoming avid users of mobile portals like Vodafone Live and MTNPlay. The Johannesburg-based Praekelt Foundation, which leverages mobile technology to improve the “health and well-being of people living in poverty”, was looking for a way to educate young South Africans about HIV/AIDS.  According to Neethling, they saw an opportunity in the fact that millions of young people use these mobile portals to chat, download music, read up on celebrity and sports news, participate in competitions, and win prizes. 

(Source: AudienceScapes)

Further details

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 10:50:39 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, July 14, 2011

The Kenya government in partnership with HP East Africa and Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) launched a project that will enable health workers in the field to detect and manage disease outbreaks through smart phones.

The move follows a donation of 250 HP Palm Pre-Smart Phones which are the first of their kind in the continent that will facilitate early detection and response to communicable public health threats in the country through mobile health monitoring technology.

The phones are part of 1 million U.S. dollar worth of technological support that HP will be extending to the government through the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) program.

Director of Public Health and Sanitation at the Ministry of Public Health Shanaaz Sharif said the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) system which has been developed in the past two months will simplify health workers' task of reporting in real time, health events that occur at the local level. "Due to technological and personnel constraints only about 5,000 of the 7,000 health facilities in the country report and maintain a record of health events on a real time basis, but now any health worker with a simple mobile handset will be enable to report", Sharif told journalists in Nairobi.

He said members of the public will also be allowed to report on health events but only through the internet. "The IDSR will enable the government to collect information in real time to help in the decision making for the appropriate public health action intervention. Mobile phones will be used to transmit raw data and then the data will entered, stored, analyzed and interpreted in real time via the computer", Sharif said.

The project will enable health workers to collect data through a web operating system application (webOS), upload the same, analyze and share the data with organizations like National Aids and Sexually Transmitted Infections Control Program (Nascop). "When health workers at the local level suspect of any disease they are expected to report this via the system to the national level so that public health officials to analyze, interpret and compare the data with prevailing trends", Sharif said.

(Source: XinhuaNews)

Further details


Thursday, July 14, 2011 5:19:45 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Ahead of the UN Climate Change Conference (COP-17), in Durban South Africa, attendees at the ITU Symposium on ICTs and Climate Change in Ghana have renewed calls for global leaders to recognize the power of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change.

An outcome document asks that ITU, as the UN specialized agency for ICTs, lead a coalition urging delegates to look to the enormous potential of ICT solutions to cut emissions across all sectors. The document calls for the adoption of a ‘closed loop’ approach to manufacturing and recycling which will reduce the need to extract and process raw materials. It also asks for recognition of the value of ICTs in monitoring deforestation, crop patterns and other environmental phenomena.

Specific mention of ICTs in the COP-17 negotiating text, along with the adoption of an agreed methodology for measuring the carbon footprint of ICT equipment and its inclusion in National Adaptation/Mitigation Plans, would provide an incentive to the ICT industry to invest in developing countries, help reduce the digital divide, and at the same time help fight climate change – a win-win scenario. ITU is already actively developing a methodology that could serve as a reliable and accurate global benchmark for assessing the carbon footprint of a wide range of ICT equipment.

Dr Hamadoun Touré, Secretary General, ITU, stressed ITU’s commitment to providing the technical know-how to mitigate and adapt to climate change. “It is now clear to most observers that ICTs have a very important role to play here. Recognition of this at the international level will provide countries with a solid argument to roll out climate change strategies with a strong ICT element”, he said.

Speaking at the opening of the Ghana symposium, Malcolm Johnson, Director of ITU’s Telecommunication Standardization Bureau, said: “Today, a world without ICTs is unthinkable. ICTs are integrated into almost all parts of our society and economy. Yet while the increasingly widespread use of ICTs has changed people’s lives dramatically and boosted economic growth, the success of technology means it is itself a growing contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, ICTs probably provide the most significant opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the major high emissions industries of energy generation, waste disposal, building and transport. This is a message we must carry to COP-17”.

(Source: ITU Newsroom)

Further details


Wednesday, July 13, 2011 9:29:47 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Increasing women's access to quality midwifery has become a focus of global efforts to realize the right of every woman to the best possible health care during pregnancy and childbirth. A first step is assessing the situation.

The State of World's Midwifery 2011: Delivering Health, Saving Lives, supported by 30 partners, provides the first comprehensive analysis of midwifery services and issues in countries where the needs are greatest.

The report provides new information and data gathered from 58 countries in all regions of the world. Its analysis confirms that the world lacks some 350,000 skilled midwives -- 112,000 in the neediest 38 countries surveyed -- to fully meet the needs of women around the world. The report explores a range of issues related to building up this key health workforce.

This page includes access to the full report in three languages, as well as related resources, applications, bibliographical information, individual country profiles and stories of midwives.

(Source: UNFPA)

Further Information

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 7:58:24 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, May 30, 2011
On Friday, Antel and the Administration of State Health Services (ASSE) presented Siembra”, a Desktop Computer System based on Medical Care Network.

This is a strategic venture for care in the public health system, which will allow doctors to access medical records of patients of ASSE electronically from anywhere in the country.

With the support of ANTEL, which will provide 3G connectivity, ASSE will link more than 800 service point’s country wide through 1,500 laptops that contain digitized medical records of each patient. The pilot will begin in the department of Artigas, will continue in Rivera and it is expected that within a year the system is operating in the department of Durazno and in the rest of the country. ASSE is working with the OPP in developing of a strategic plan. ASSE general manager, Enrique Buchino, said in a second stage that they pretend to
include hospitals, therefore providing data in case of hospitalization or surgery.

(Source: ElAcontecer Newspaper)
Further details

Monday, May 30, 2011 7:44:04 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, March 09, 2011
In an attempt to bridge the digital divide, the Sanchar Shakti scheme envisages creating ICT skills among rural women by providing useful information to women about health, social issues and government schemes over their mobile phones. The scheme seeks involvement of women Self Help Groups for its successful implementation.

President Pratibha Patil on Monday launched DoT-USOFs' pilot project Sanchar Shakti, which aims to provide useful information to women, about health, social issues and government schemes over their mobile phones.

The scheme, which is funded by Department of Telecom's (DoT) Universal Service Obligation Funds (USOFs), is for mobile value-added services and information and communication technologies (ICT) related livelihood skills for Women's Self Help Groups.

"The scheme is initiated as a gender budget scheme, it adopts an innovative approach to connect rural women with the information and communication technologies (ICT) sector, by involving women Self Help Groups (SHGs)," Patil told reporters.

It will also serve the purpose of increasing the tele density, as well as broad band connectivity in rural areas, enabling them to join the cyber community and in this way, bridge the digital divide, states the details of the scheme.

With the creation of ICT skills sets in rural areas, over a period of time, these areas can become centres for the consumption and production of various ICT goods and services, including hubs for processing outsourced work, it added.

Patil added, "Real development cannot take root if it bypasses women, who represent the very pivot around which social change takes shape."

(Source:One world South Asia News)

Full Story



Wednesday, March 09, 2011 1:10:56 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, March 03, 2011

The device used in the Massachusetts National Hospital did hit the tumor diagnosis in 96% of patients.

With only a mobile phone, a thin needle and a small molecular magnetic resonance apparatus it is possible to detect cancerous tumors. This was explained by the doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital in an article published in the journal “Science Translational Medicine”.

Thanks to this innovative system used by doctors could succeed in the diagnosis of cancer in 96% of patients, a figure higher than with the traditional biopsy.

"The system prevents patients undergo to procedures that are painful and potentially dangerous", said Cesar M. Castro from Harvard Medical School, Boston, and a member of the team that developed the procedure.

Through the collection of a portion of tumor tissue, which is subjected to an "immunohistochemistry" (a test that uses a specific procedure that "mark" the existence of cancer cells), is how they do the diagnostic of molecular analysis fast. To this are added biopsies and in some cases, previous surgeries.

The nuclear magnetic resonance micro device used “nanoparticles” as sensors that measure the chemicals in the cells and the device is connected to a phone, so that doctors can measure and read the data next to the patient's bed.

After scanning the tissues from patients to detect the expression of nine key proteins, the doctors correctly identified to 44 patients who had malignant tumors, and each of the diagnoses was confirmed with conventional biopsy.

 

(Source: Peru 21 news paper)

Further details

Thursday, March 03, 2011 8:55:19 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Saturday, February 26, 2011
Phones with features that let to control the heart rhythm, diabetes, or to report sexually transmitted diseases, were presented at the World Mobile Congress, the biggest cell exposition in the world that culminated yesterday in Barcelona, Spain.

Many prevention services in the field of health through cell phones, are available through SMS or MMS messages, which
work on any type of cell.

The Society Health Company, which covers Arabia Saudi and Kuwait, send to around 430,000 customers information in Arabic or in English about diabetes, sex, obesity and child health every month.

For grandparents manufacturers began to simplify smart phones to make them accessible
for older people.

The French subsidiary of the Austrian firm Emporia, for example, equips its phones with a mini-flashlight, which allows its owner to have a night light and that glows when the phone rings. One model has a strap with a classic little black book in which you can write with a pen.

(Source: Casetel - Venezuela)
Further details

Saturday, February 26, 2011 2:11:31 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, February 22, 2011

The Ministry of Environment and the Telecommunications company Claro, have signed an agreement that aims to create a platform for inter-agency collaboration to implement mechanisms for coordination and cooperation, promoting the activities of mutual interest and benefit, for the purpose of disseminating issues linked to environmental management and conservation and sustainable use of natural resources.

In this context, CLARO has been developing some time ago its iniciative "I recycle, I'm Claro" initiative that seeks to promote concern for environmental care in the population through responsible disposal of cell phones, batteries and accessories in disuse , nationwide.

In Peru, electronic waste (RAEE) such as cell phones, for example, generate about 250 tons of electronic waste, stored improperly, cause environmental damage and health of people due to the high toxicity of its small components produced based on metals and minerals such as aluminum, copper, iron, zinc, lead, tin, among others.

In this regard, the Ministry of Environment undertakes to support all initiatives and events undertaken in the framework of this strategic alliance for the benefit of a better quality of life and environment for all Peruvians.

 For its part, CLARO, through such actions, seeks to implement the necessary mechanisms to strengthen the culture of recycling in the country, while providing all the Peruvians a sustainable alternative to discard all those teams that are no longer used in a responsible manner, without causing further damage to the environment.

(Source:MINAM - Peru)

Further details

Tuesday, February 22, 2011 8:19:25 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Sunday, February 20, 2011
Taking account the continuous interest of the National Government to ensure that the Colombians know about the shares that have been advanced, as well as those plans in relation to the deployment of wireless broadband infrastructure in the country, and the incidence of electromagnetic fields on health and the environment, the Spectrum Agency (ANE), in coordination with the Ministry of Information Technologies and Communications (MINTIC) - entity that has officially asked the ANE for its support in these issues - and the Communications Regulation Commission (CRC), have decided to pool efforts in two strategic issues: a) infrastructure and regulation, b) health and environment.

Therefore, the
ANE published the Action Plan between the administration and telecom operators: electromagnetic fields, health and environment ", which is published on the website www.ane.gov.co: “Electromagnetic Fields, Health and Environment”.

(Source: Mintic - Columbia)
Further details

Sunday, February 20, 2011 7:09:53 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Sunday, January 30, 2011
UNESCO highlighted the contribution of the Program Computers for Schools from the ICT Ministry, which manages the electronic waste in Colombia, highlighting the program as an example of "best practices" considering that it has "extended its refurbishment projects for the recycling process".

The book “The Electronic Waste: a challenge for the knowledge society in Latin America and the Caribbean” emphasizes that the e-waste require a propper management and that "in many countries there is a lack of specific regulations and business initiatives for its sustainable treatment".

The document says too that "despite the undeniable benefits of the Information and Communicatons Technology, we cannot forget the pollution that it can cause to end the cycle of life" and in this context highlights the
work of the Program Computers for Schools from Colombia and Chilenter from Chile.

"In the Digital Living Plan of Colombia, which will spread the use of technology, we contemplated the use and final disposal of electronic waste that is a commitment to shows the responsibility which we assume as goals in this administration, and we project a development that will have not any conflict with the environment of our country", said the ICT Minister, Diego Molano.

With this recognition, and the environmental license, granted for the proper management of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (RAEE) by Resolution 7253 issued on November 25, 2010, the Program Computers for Schools is confirmed as the first State center from Latin America to take advantage and give an appropriate provision for electronic waste.

“2010 was very positive year for the use of electronic waste, as it is managed in an environmentally sound manner over 32,000 damaged and obsolete computers and consolidated a model of exploitation and management of electronic waste, closing the materials cycle and prevents thousands of tons of these wastes are disposed improperly and generate negative environmental impacts,  on account of some toxic substances contained in them”, said the Executive Director of the Program Computers for Schools, Martha Castellanos.

(Source: MINTIC - Colombia)
Further details

Sunday, January 30, 2011 6:20:19 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Saturday, December 11, 2010

With this project of education, the Dominican Telecommunications Institute (Indotel) next to the Orange Foundation, and Dynamic Stimulation and Digital Literacy (EDAD) have dual purpose: to prevent cognitive decline in older persons and promote the use of technology systems for social integration.

The convention was attended by the Chairman of the Board of Indotel, Dr. David Perez Taveras; Indotel executive director, Dr. Joelle Exarhakos, Mr. Andrés Ferreira and Manuel Gimeno from the Orange Foundation, which discussed the possibility of implement this project without cost in the digital classrooms that Indotel has created.

Older people form a group that usually live outside of the Information Society, despite constituting an increasingly important part of our population and have much free time at home, they can take advantage of ICT access to information, administrative management or shop online from home, contact with other seniors or their family members and enrich their leisure activities. In addition, the use of computer requires a proactive that can stimulate the cognitive abilities of older people but also by helping to keep the mind in the exercise.

To meet these needs, researchers of the Department of Educational Psychology, Faculty of Education at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), with the support of the Orange Foundation, has developed this draft of Stimulation Dynamics and Digital Literacy ( EDAD) and in alliance with Indotel to use the Computer Training Center as a platform to teach these courses in the 32 provinces of the country, encouraging the use of technology systems for the social integration and prevent cognitive decline in older people.

What is the Project “EDAD”?
EDAD Project (Stimulation Dynamic and Digital Literacy) is defined as a free course, available through the Internet, for older people to meet and learn to use the computer with a dual purpose: to prevent cognitive decline and promote social integration through the use of technology systems.
The “EDAD” Project is based on the design of a specific methodology adapted to the needs of the elderly, offering a training program that allows easy access to the world of technology and, in turn, strengthens their mental functions as memory, thinking or solving problems.

(Source: Indotel - Dominican Republic)
Further details

Saturday, December 11, 2010 4:30:07 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Sunday, November 21, 2010
Simple mobile technology, like basic cell phones, can be used to save the lives of mothers in childbirth, and improve the care of newborns and children, reaching underserved populations in remote areas. The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH) praises innovation seen at the second mHealth Conference in Washington, and PMNCH Partners’ Forum in New Delhi.

More advanced mobile technology can do even more, such as checking on patients, keeping records, improving diagnosis and treatment in the field, and letting community health workers consult general practitioners and specialists for guidance."With mobile technologies for health, called ‘mhealth’ or ‘mobile health,’ we’re extending capabilities to where they don’t exist today", says David Aylward, who heads mHealth Alliance, a partnership founded by the United Nations Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Vodafone Foundation.

"At the most basic level, mobile phones can be used to keep track of people, call for emergency assistance, remind them of appointments and share information", says Julian Schweitzer, PhD, former Chair of The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Care (PMNCH) and the Chair of the Finance Working Group for the UN Secretary-General's Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health, launched in September. "But then you can layer on things like check lists, protocols, the steps to ensure a safe birth and action instructions in particular circumstances", says Dr. Schweitzer.

Used by midwives in rural, urban slums and isolated areas, cell phones can also be attached to diagnostic devices, including those used for remote fetal monitoring or remote wireless ultrasound. This lets a midwife or health worker know in advance that a mother must get to a clinic. They can also be used for recording births and deaths or assuring that both women and children get the care they need when and where they need it.

"In the near future, wireless diagnostics like stethoscopes, blood pressure, temperature and insulin monitors, and ultrasounds will enable remote diagnosis and treatment far from the closest doctor or clinic", says Mr. Aylward.

(Source: PMNCH and World Health Organization)

Further details



Sunday, November 21, 2010 1:57:49 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, November 01, 2010
On 21 October, was held the first meeting of the ICT Plan for Public Safety, as part of the Implementation of the Strategy: Ecuador Digital, by the Ministry of Telecommunication and Information Society (Mintel).

Participants who attended the meeting, the Plan Committee members, representing the Ministry of Telecommunication and Information Society were: Mr. Hugo Gonzalez, manager of the ICT Plan for Public Safety; Ec. Julia Rodriguez, director of Online Government, Mr. Alonso Llanos, Director of Broadcasting, Mr. Carlos Freire and Carlos Fernandez as
staff members. Also, as a member of the National Planning Secretariat (Senplades) attended the meeting Bolivar Quishpe.

In this meeting, the participants reviewed the methodology to use to enter the Policies, Programs and Projects of the Plan in question, which aims to improve the level of public safety through the use of Information and Communication Technologies, in line with what is stipulated in the National Plan of Good Living. For the Government is important to coordinate actions to strengthen policies for the provision of connectivity, equipment, and digital content readiness.


(Source: Mintel)
Further details

Monday, November 01, 2010 11:02:38 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Saturday, October 09, 2010
After the experience of having a family member who forgets things and the names of objects, the teacher Erika Hernández Rubio proposed to a group of students from the School of Computing (ESCOM), from the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) to develop an interactive system to exercise the memory of people over 50 years.

To this request, the students began to develop a software system which is intended to exercise the memory of adults and thus prevent damage. The proposal was designed for people aged from 55 to 64 years of age are likely to suffer mental deterioration in cognitive, "but not a medical option to prevent diseases such as Alzheimer's", the teacher
Hernandez Rubio said.

To use the system established by polytechnic students is necessary that the elderly be able to use a computer. The software was designed by Raúl Fernando Montiel, Ivan Vazquez Rosales and Oswaldo Sanchez Lascano. This software includes games, exercises, tests, results and paragraph Learn to learn. You can select different types of games numbered from 1 to 10.

Source:Universia.net
Futher details

Saturday, October 09, 2010 10:35:15 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, September 27, 2010

Telenor Serbia Foundation, founded by Telenor Serbia in March 2007, continues to resolve targeted social and educational problems that Serbian society faces. The Telenor Foundation mainly focuses on youth, their education and professional advancement, socially vulnerable groups and the development of cultural production and the art market.

Its “Internet for all Project” aims to promote and increase the Internet use among its citizens. Serbia is lagging behind developed European countries in Internet use. Only 32 percent of the population in Serbia uses the Internet, which is significantly lower than the European average of 49 percent. The majority of the Serbian students do not have access to Internet at home, some of them not even to computers. The “Internet for all project“ has the main goal of providing unlimited access to the Internet for a period of one year to students.

Telenor Serbia also supports an information center for people with disabilities by providing a free telephone line, Internet access and technical support. By calling toll-free, users get information and advice from experts in a number of areas including law, education, social and health related matters, and other relevant issues of particular importance to this group. At the same time, user suggestions are directed to specialized institutions and organizations.

Telenor has also partnered with the Ministry of Health and UNICEF to promote a more efficient and better-quality health support to Roma families in Serbia.The project was kicked-off with a one-day training course for Roma healthcare mediators by providing technical equipment and solutions from Telenor. A special tariff package and mobile phone will enable the mediators to call each other free of charge and inform the families they are assisting. At the same time, they were given laptops with special software which will make it possible to more efficiently report to and communicate with the institutions. 60 mediators in 50 towns in Serbia are taking part in this project. Mediators are Roma women and mothers with completed elementary education. For them this project is an opportunity to find employment.

From the start of the project in 2008 the mediators have made 56,178 visits and recorded 102,661 Roma for the project purposes. “Apart from recording the Roma settlements, we have provided personal identification documents and medical care cards for 5,677 persons, vaccinated 4,800 children, controlled 1,672 pregnant women and expecting mothers“, says Dubravka Šaranović, senior adviser in the Ministry of Health. 

(Sources: Telenor Serbia Foundation)

Further Details


Monday, September 27, 2010 7:33:01 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     |