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ICT Data and Statistics (IDS)  

Contents

  • FOREWORD
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 1.1 Public telecommunications sector indicators
  • 1.2 Reporting period
  • 1.3 Demographic and macro-economic data
  • 1.4 Derived indicators
  • 1.5 Aggregated indicators
  • 1.6 Telecommunications organizations
  • 1.7 Telecommunications services
  • 2. DEFINITIONS
  • Telephone network size and dimension
  • 1. Telephone main lines in operation
  • 2. Total capacity of local public switching exchanges
  • 3. Main lines connected to digital exchanges
  • 4. Main lines for residential use
  • 5. Main lines in urban areas
  • 6. Public pay phones
  • Other services
  • 7. Telex subscriber lines
  • 8. Cellular mobile telephone subscribers
  • 9. Radio paging subscribers
  • 10. Leased circuits
  • 11. Public data network subscribers
  • 12. Videotex subscribers
  • 13. ISDN subscribers
  • Quality of Service
  • 14. Waiting list for main lines
  • 15. Percentage of telephone service faults cleared by next working day
  • 16. Percentage of calls which fail during the busy hour
  • 17. Telephone main lines faults
  • 18. Percentage of calls for operator service answered within 15 seconds
  • 19. Complaints per 1000 bills
  • 20. Customer satisfaction rate
  • Traffic
  • 21. Local telephone traffic
  • 22. National telephone traffic
  • 23. International telephone traffic
  • 24. National telegrams
  • 25. International outgoing telegrams
  • 26. National telex traffic
  • 27. International telex traffic
  • Tariffs
  • 28. Telephone service installation charge
  • 29. Telephone service monthly subscription charge
  • 30. Telephone service national call charges
  • 31. Telephone service international call charges
  • 32. Mobile communication charges
  • 33. Leased line charges
  • 34. Packet-switched data communications network charges
  • Staff
  • 35. Total full-time staff in telecommunications services
  • Revenue and expenses
  • 36. Total revenues from all telecommunications services
  • 37. Revenues from telephone connection charges
  • 38. Revenues from telephone subscription charges
  • 39. Revenues from local and national calls
  • 40. Revenues from international calls
  • 41. Revenues from telegram and telex services
  • 42. Revenues from other data/text services
  • 43. Revenue from leased lines
  • 44. Revenue from mobile communications services
  • 45. Other revenues
  • 46. Total current expenditure for all telecommunication services
  • 47. Operational expenditure
  • 48. Interest
  • 49. Income taxes
  • 50. Depreciation
  • 51. Other expenditures
  • Investment
  • 52. Total annual investment in telecommunication including land and buildings
  • 53. Total annual investment in telecommunication excluding land and buildings
  • 54. Annual investment in telephone switching equipment
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY
  • ANNEX A. TARIFF SCHEDULES
  • ANNEX B. TELEVISION BROADCASTING DEFINITIONS
  • Television receivers
  • Television households
  • Homes passed by cable television
  • Cable television households / subscribers
  • Direct to Home satellite antennas
  • Multichannel homes

Foreward

The growth of the service sector in national economies has brought telecommunications into the spotlight. The importance of telecommunications as a service industry in itself as well as a critical support element for other service industries is now the subject of high level policy formulation in practically every country in the world. This has led to changes such as the separation of telecommunication operations and regulations, privatisation of telecommunication operators and the introduction of competition. Interest in telecommunications now extends beyond engineers to include government officials, economists, lawyers, banks, users and the press.

The Telecommunication Indicator Handbook identifies and defines the most important indicators for analysis of the telecommunication sector. Its goal is to assist the standardization of statistics to improve analysis and comparisons within and across countries and telecommunication operators.

Draft versions of this Handbook were discussed at the following meetings: OECD Working Party on Telecommunication and Information Services Policies (Paris, February 1993), BDT Working Group on Telecommunication Development Indicators (Brasila, October 1993) and EUROSTAT ICOBS/AS Working Group (Luxembourg, January 1994). The Handbook would not have been possible without the cooperation of the telecommunication regulators, operators and international agencies that provided valuable comments in these meetings. The Handbook has also considered indicators contained in the documents identified in the Bibliography.

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 Public telecommunications sector indicators

The purpose of the Handbook is to identify and define the most important indicators useful for analyzing the public telecommunication sector. The term "Public telecommunication sector" refers to the telecommunications infrastructure and services provided on this infrastructure for the public at large. This would include telecommunication networks (e.g., telephone, telex, telegraph, data) which consist of exchanges (switches) linked by transmission circuits that connect subscribers to each other and with subscribers abroad. Anyone can subscribe to the network; hence the term public which refers to the access arrangement rather than the ownership of the network. The public telecommunications sector does not include private networks (1) that do not automatically connect to the public network or which have limitations on membership. The public telecommunications sector also excludes telecommunications equipment manufacturing and broadcasting (2).

The Handbook provides a basic list of indicators that network operators and regulatory agencies should strive to collect and disseminate. Definitions are included to assist telecommunications analysts as well as the growing number of non-specialists interested in telecommunications to understand the data. Guidelines are provided for those responsible for collecting and disseminating national statistics.

The list of indicators is shown in Table 1. The indicators are classified into different areas that provide a broad view of the public telecommunication sector. Telephone network size and dimension shows parameters for what is typically the largest component of the telecommunications sector, the telephone network. The parameters measure the total size and the number of users, how modern the network is and the composition of the user base. Enhanced and other services shows subscribers of newer services such as mobile telephones and data networks as well as the long standing telex service. Quality of service measures the reliability of the telephone network. Traffic measures the usage of the telephone, telegram and telex networks both nationally and internationally. Tariffs show the costs to the subscriber for using telecommunications services. Staff shows the number of people employed in the public telecommunications sector. Revenue and costs show the income and costs associated with providing telecommunications services. Investment shows expenditure for expanding and modernizing the network.

Table 1: Telecommunication indicators

Telephone Network Size and Dimension
1. Telephone main lines in operation
2. Total capacity of local public switching exchanges
3. Main lines connected to digital exchanges
4. Main lines which are for residential use
5. Main lines in urban areas
6. Public pay phones
Other Services
7. Number of telex subscribers
8. Cellular mobile telephone subscribers
9. Radio pager subscribers
10. Leased circuits
11. Public data network subscribers
12. Videotex subscribers
13. ISDN subscribers
Quality of Service
14. Waiting list for main lines
15. Percentage of telephone service faults cleared by next working day
16. Percentage of calls which fail
17. Telephone main line faults
18. Percentage of calls for operator service answered within 15 seconds
19. Complaints per 1000 bills
20. Customer satisfaction rate
Traffic
21. Local telephone traffic
22. National telephone traffic
23. International telephone traffic
24. National telegrams
25. International outgoing telegrams
26. National telex traffic
27. International outgoing telex traffic
Tariffs
28. Telephone service installation charge
29. Telephone service monthly subscription charge
30. National call charges
31. International call charges
32. Mobile communications charges
33. Leased line charges
34. Packet-switched data communications network charges
Staff
35. Total full-time staff in telecommunication services
Revenue and Costs
36. Total revenues from all telecommunication services of which:
37. Revenues from telephone service
37a. Revenues from telephone connection charges
37b. Revenues from telephone subscription charges
37c. Revenues from local and national calls
37d. Revenues from international calls
38. Revenues from telegrams and telex services
39. Revenues from other data/text services
40. Revenue from leased lines
41. Revenue from mobile communications services
42. Other revenues
43. Total expenditure for telecommunication services of which:
44. Operational expenses
45. Net interest payments/receipts
46. Taxes
47. Depreciation
48. Other expenditures
Investment
49. Total annual investment in telecommunications, including land and buildings
50. Total annual investment in telecommunications, excluding land and buildings
50a. Annual investment in research and development
50b. Annual investment in telephone switching equipment

1.2 Reporting period

The indicators should be collected at least on an annual basis. Historical data should be retained for measuring trends and forecasting future demand. The use of a common reporting year (e.g., end of the calendar year) is desirable for comparative purposes. While this is not always possible due to differing national practices, all the data should at least refer to the same end period to enhance the precision of derivations. For example, operational data and financial data should refer to the same end period to measure revenue per subscriber line accurately.

1.3 Demographic and macro-economic data

The list of indicators does not contain demographic or macro-economic statistics. These data are needed for gauging telecommunications network penetration and the impact of telecommunications on the overall economy. Demographic and macro-economic statistics are regularly collected and disseminated by national statistical agencies and economic and finance ministries as well as regional and international organizations (e.g., OECD, UN, World Bank, International Monetary Fund). Some of the main publications containing demographic and economic statistics are shown in the bibliography.

Demographic and macro-economic data useful for telecommunication analysis are described in Table 2:

Table 2: Demographic and macro-economic indicators

Demographic Population size is essential for measuring network penetration (e.g., telephone lines per 100 inhabitants). Number of households and percentage of population in urban areas is also useful.
Employment Useful for expressing telecommunications employment as a percentage of total employment.
Exchange rate Needed for converting financial data to a standard unit for inter-country comparisons such as the US dollar or the ECU. It is preferable to use an average exchange rate since telecommunications financial operations typically accrue over a period of time. For tariff comparisons, it is preferable to use Purchasing Power Parties (PPPs) which compensate for the different cost of living between countries.
Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Useful for gauging the size of the telecommunications sector vis-a-vis the overall domestic economy (e.g., telecommunications revenues as a percent of GDP).
Gross Fixed Capital Formation (GFCF) Useful for measuring the share of telecommunications investment to total investment in the economy (e.g., telecommunications investment as a percent of GFCF).
Inflation Price Index Inflation price indices are useful for correcting financial data for the effects of inflation. Common prices indices include the consumer price index or the GDP deflator though for investment time-series it is preferable to use a GFCF Deflator.

1.4 Derived indicators

Derived statistics are not defined since these can be calculated from the primary indicators. For example, main lines per 100 inhabitants can be calculated from main lines and population, telecommunications staff per 1,000 main lines can be derived from full-time staff and main lines, etc. The most typical types of derivations used are identified in Table 3.

Table 3. Derived indicators

Main lines per 100 inhabitants Main lines / Population * 100

The most widely used indicator for comparing the penetration of telephone service.

Employees per 1000 main lines Employees / Main lines * 1000

The most widely used indicator for comparing staff productivity.

Telecom revenues as a per cent of GDP Telecom revenues / GDP

Useful for comparing the size of the telecom sector to the overall economy.

Telecom investment as a per cent of GFCF Telecom investment / GFCF

Useful for comparing the share of telecom investment to overall investment in the economy.

1.5 Aggregated indicators

The telecommunications indicators are useful for intra-country (when more than one national operator) as well as inter-country comparisons. If there is more than one operator in a country, their results need to be added to obtain an overall total so that international comparisons can be made (3). Common reporting periods and indicators (as contained in the list) are important for obtaining accurate country totals and enhancing transparency in comparisons.

The United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) annual Yearbook provides a good example of how a country total can be obtained where there are many operators providing service. See Table 4.

Table 4. Aggregation Example

31.12.1990 Total US AT&T Communications Inc. Seven Regional Bell Operating Companies Other Reporting Local Exchange Companies
Full-time employees 639'470 76'869 440'466 122'135
Total switched access lines 126'388'961   103'874'183 22'514'778
Total operating revenues (thousands of dollars) 117'423'237 33'533'605 67'010'637 16'878'995

Source: Adapted from FCC. Statistics of Communications Common Carriers. 1990/91 Edition. US Government Printing Office, Washington D.C.

1.6 Telecommunications organizations

In order to obtain a complete picture of the public telecommunications sector in the country, it is also useful to know the names of the agency responsible for enacting the telecommunications laws of the country (typically a ministry), the entity responsible for supervising and regulating the operators and a list of operators which have been licensed and the services they provide.

Table 5. Telecommunications organizations example

Ministry: Department of Trade and Industry
Regulator: Office of Telecommunications (OFTEL)
Operator(s): British Telecommunications
  Mercury Communications, Inc.
  Kingston Telecommunications

1.7 Telecommunications services

It is also useful to know the various telecommunications services available in a country. A sample list is shown in Table 6.

Table 6. Telecommunication services

Call waiting Alerts user with special tone that there is an incoming call.
Call forwarding Allows calls to be forwarded to another location.
Caller identification Displays the phone number of the person calling.
Group calling Allows more than two people to participate in telephone conversation.
Country Direct Service Allows residents of a country to obtain operator and calling services from their country when abroad.
800 (Green) Numbers Calls charged to recipient rather than caller.
ISDN Access to Integrated Services Digital Network.
Video Conference Access to facility for image-based conversations.
Videotex Access to videotex network.
Electronic directory Access to an electronic version of the telephone directory.
Electronic mail Access to Internet- or X.400-based electronic mail.
900 Service Special service numbers whereby caller pays fee for information provided in addition to any local calling charges.
Radio paging Access to a radio paging network.
Cellular mobile telephone Access to mobile network employing cellular technology.
Packet switch data network Access to data network employing packet switching (e.g., X.25) technology.
Telex Access to world-wide telex network.
High speed data communications Special data communications services besides dial-up over modem, ISDN or packet-switching network.
Telecommunication credit cards Availability of credit cards for calling that can be used in pay phones in other countries.

Note: This list is intended to be indicative rather than comprehensive.

2. DEFINITIONS

Telephone network size and dimension

1. Telephone main lines in operation

  • A main line is a telephone line connecting the subscriber's terminal equipment to the public switched network and which has a dedicated port in the telephone exchange equipment. This term is synonymous with the term "main station" or "Direct Exchange Line" (DEL) which are commonly used in telecommunication documents. It may not be the same as an access line or a subscriber (see below).

    It is understood that:

    --the line connected to the telephone exchange may be either an exclusive exchange line or a shared line;

    --when a subscriber's equipment has several extensions (private branch exchange), the number of main lines is equal to the number of lines connecting the installation to the telephone exchange, whether these lines are operated in one direction or in both directions.

    Example:

    A subscriber's equipment with extensions is served by 50 lines which connect it to the telephone exchange. The installation has ten operating positions (and therefore ten "operator's stations") and 500 extensions. In accordance with the above definition this installation must be counted as having 50 main lines (i.e. as many as there are lines connecting the subscriber installation to the exchange).

    In other words, it will not be counted as having:

    • either one main line (which would refer to the installation),
    • or ten main lines (which would correspond to the number of operator's stations),
    • or 500 main lines (which correspond to the extensions).

    A distinction should be noted between subscriber and main line. Subscribers (e.g., customer's which are billed individually) may share the same line (e.g., party line) or use extensions from a private extensions. Thus one main line could serve several subscribers. Some operators are not in a position to report main lines and report the number of subscribers. This should be described in a note; the treatment of payphones should be explained since these normally would be included as main lines.

    Some operators report access lines rather than main lines. Access lines typically include extensions on Private Automatic Branch Exchanges (PABXs) that can be billed separately or that have their own telephone number. Operators that report access lines rather than main lines should provide their definition; if possible they should specify the number of extensions counted as access lines.

    The treatment of high speed lines which contain many voice channels compressed on the same circuit poses a definitional challenge. For instance, a large organization may lease a single 1.5 or 2.0 Mbit/s circuit giving multiple voice channels. In this instance, for purposes of comparison, it would be better to count the number of channels (multiple) rather than the line (single).

2. Total capacity of local public switching exchanges

  • The total capacity of public switching exchanges corresponds to the maximum number of main lines which can be connected. This number includes, therefore, main lines already connected and main lines available for future connection, including those used for the technical operation of the exchange (test numbers). The measure should be the actual capacity of the system rather than the theoretical potential when the system is upgraded or compression technology is employed.

3. Main lines connected to digital exchanges

  • The number of main lines connected to digital telephone exchanges. It should be made clear that this indicator does not measure the exchanges which are digital, inter-exchange lines which are digital or digital network termination points, though these may be useful measures in their own right. Respondents should indicate if the main lines included in the definition are only those in operation (indicator 1) or the total capacity (indicator 2).

4. Main lines for residential use

  • The number of main lines serving households (i.e., lines which are not used for business, government or other professional purposes or as public telephone stations). The definition of "households" which is being applied should be indicated.

5. Main lines in urban areas

  • The number of main lines in urban areas by the total number of main lines in the country. The definition of urban should be supplied. See Table 6 for an illustrative example.

Table 6: Urban main lines example

Distribution of Telephones (DELs) between Urban and Rural Areas, India, 31st March 1991

  No. of DELs
(000 lines)
DELs
(%)
Urban    
2 M.T.N.L. 1213 23.90
2 Metro City Districts 434 8.55
15 Major City Districts 777 15.31
281 Other Cities 1241 24.46
3396 Towns with population 5000 & above 880 17.34
Total Urban 4545 89.56
Rural 530 10.44
All India 5075 100.00

Note: Villages: (=Population less than 5,000)
Source: Department of Communications. Indian Telecommunication Statistics 1991. New Delhi. p. 5.

6. Public pay phones

  • Public telephones refers to the total number of all types of public telephones including coin and card operated and public telephones in call offices. Public phones installed in private places should also be included as should mobile public telephones. All public telephones regardless of capability (e.g., local calls or national only) should be counted. Where the national definition of pay phone differs from that above (e.g., by excluding pay phones in private places) this should be noted.

Other services

7. Telex subscriber lines

  • A telex subscriber line is a line connecting the subscriber's terminal equipment to the public telex network and which has a dedicated port in the telex exchange equipment.

8. Cellular mobile telephone subscribers

  • Subscribers to an automatic public mobile telephone service which provides access to the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) using cellular technology. This can be further sub-divided by analog and digital systems. Subscribers to public mobile data services, private trunked mobile radio, telepoint, or radio paging services should not be included.

9. Radio paging subscribers

  • Users of portable paging devices that can be called from the PSTN.

10. Leased circuits

  • Leased circuits refer to a two-way link for the exclusive use of a subscriber regardless of the way it is used by the subscriber (e.g., switched subscriber or non-switched, or voice or data). Leased circuits, also referred to as leased lines, can be either national or international in scope. In reporting this indicator, only the number of lines should be included, not the number of network termination points.

11. Public data network subscribers

  • The number of subscribers to public data networks including packet-switched networks, circuit-switched networks, and dial-up data networks. Separate indicators can be reported for each. Countries should specify in a note what networks they are including.

12. Videotex subscribers

  • Subscribers to videotex service (using terminals to communicate with databases over the telephone network).

13. ISDN subscribers

  • The number of subscribers to the Integrated Services Digital Network. This can be separated by basic rate interface service (i.e., 2B+D, CCITT Rec. I.420) and primary rate.

Quality of Service

14. Waiting list for main lines

  • Un-met applications for connection to the PSTN which have had to be held over owing to a lack of technical facilities (equipment, lines, etc.). It should be specified what is the normal period for responding to requests for a new line (for instance, no more than two weeks from the date of the request). Separate indicators should be collected for waiting times to other services, e.g., leased lines, mobile communications, packet switched data communications.

15. Percentage of telephone service faults cleared by next working day

  • Faults cleared by the next working day refers to the percentage of faults reported to the PSTN that have been corrected by the end of the next working day. (e.g., not including non-working days (weekends)). Separate indictors of fault clearance should be collected for other services.

16. Percentage of calls which fail during the busy hour

  • The percentage of unsuccessful calls refers to the number of calls that could not be completed due to technical problems for which the operator is responsible (e.g., network congestion, line failure) divided by the total number of calls (successful and unsuccessful). Numbers that are engaged, called party not available or subscriber error should not be included as incomplete calls. Separate indicators of call failure should be collected for other services. For leased lines, percentage of time the line is un-available to the customer is a better indicator.

17. Telephone main lines faults

  • The total number of reported faults to main telephone lines for the year. Countries should specify whether faults due to faulty terminal equipment on the customer's premises is included in the indicator or not. Faults which are not the direct responsibility of the public telecommunications operator should probably be excluded.

18. Percentage of calls for operator service answered within 15 seconds

  • The percentage of calls for operator services answered within 15 seconds. This should include directory inquiry and operator assistance calls. A separate indicator should be collected for response times for emergency service calls.

19. Complaints per 1000 bills

  • The number of complaints regarding billing for the year divided by the number of bills sent out multiplied by 1000. Countries may want to specify whether the complaints were valid or not.

20. Customer satisfaction rate

  • A number of telecommunication companies employ customized techniques for gauging customer satisfaction to their services. Explanation regarding the methodology used should be provided in a note.

Traffic

21. Local telephone traffic

  • Local traffic consists of effective (completed) traffic exchanged within the local charging area in which the calling station is situated. This is the area within which one subscriber can call another on payment of the local charge (if applicable). This indicator should be reported in the number of calls (messages) and/or minutes. If the indicator is reported in meter units or pulses, then an appropriate conversion figure to calls/minutes of traffic should be supplied. Each country should include a footnote explaining its definition of the local charging area and indicate the number of such areas and their average size (in km2).

22. National telephone traffic

  • National trunk (toll) traffic consists of effective (completed) national traffic exchanged with a station outside the local charging area of the calling station. As above, the indicator should be reported as the number of calls and/or minutes of traffic.

23. International telephone traffic

  • International traffic can be broken down by outgoing traffic (effective (completed) traffic originating in a given country to destinations outside that country) and incoming traffic (traffic originating outside the country with a destination inside the country). The indicator should be reported in number of calls and in minutes of traffic. Bilateral traffic to particular countries should also be reported (see Table 7). The treatment of paid versus free traffic and collect and country direct services should be explained in a note.

Table 7: International bi-lateral telephone traffic

  Outgoing/Calling Incoming/Receiving

Country Minutes Calls Minutes Calls
Country 1        
Country 2        
Country 3        
         
Country n        

24. National telegrams

  • The number of charged telegrams which both originate and terminate within the same country. Should be measured as the number of telegrams rather than the number of words.

25. International outgoing telegrams

  • The number of charged outgoing full rate telegrams originating in a given country with a destination outside the country. Should be measured as the number of telegrams rather than the number of words.

26. National telex traffic

  • All the telex traffic which both originates and terminates within the same country. Should be provided as number of messages and minutes.

27. International telex traffic

  • All the outgoing telex traffic originating in a given country with a destination outside the country. If available, the total incoming telex traffic terminating in a given country should also be reported. Should be provided as number of messages and minutes.

Tariffs

  • All tariffs should be expressed in local currency at current prices. A separate statement should be made concerning tax rates (e.g., sales tax, value-added tax); whether tax is included or not, at what rate it is levied and whether it can be reclaimed by businesses.

28. Telephone service installation charge

  • Installation refers to one-off charges involved in applying for basic telephone service. Where there are different charges for different exchange areas the charge for the largest urban area should be used and specified in a note. Where there are different installation charges for residential and business consumers or for first and subsequent lines, these should be stated separately.

29. Telephone service monthly subscription charge

  • Monthly subscription refers to the recurring fixed charge for subscribing to the PSTN. The charge should cover the rental of the line but not the rental of the terminal (e.g., telephone set) where the terminal equipment market is liberalized. Separate charges should be stated where appropriate, for residential and business subscribers or for first and subsequent lines. If the rental charge includes any allowance for free or reduced rate call units this should be indicated. If there are different charges for different exchange areas, the largest urban area should be used and specified in a note.

30. Telephone service national call charges

  • National call charges can be separated by local and long distance calls. Local calls should be provided as the cost of a peak rate 3-minute call within the same exchange area using the subscriber's own terminal (i.e., not from a public telephone). In addition the costs of a local call from a public pay telephone should be provided. See Table A-1 for an example of how long-distance calls within the country might be provided.

31. Telephone service international call charges

  • This is the cost of a 3-minute direct dialled (i.e., without operator intervention) call from a destination within the country to a destination outside the country. The rate should be supplied for peak rate time calls and off-peak (discount) rate calls (if applicable). The cost should be reported in national currency, with a statement on what taxes are applied. See Table A-2 for an example of how this data might be provided.

32. Mobile communication charges

  • The connection charge and monthly subscription charge and call charges by distance, duration and time of day/week, for mobile telephone service. Separate information should be provided for analogue (e.g., TACS, NMT, AMPS)) and digital (e.g., GSM) services where applicable (see Table A-1).

33. Leased line charges

  • Connection charge and monthly rental charge. Costs should be specified for different speeds (e.g., 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 19.2, 56/64 kbit/s and 1.5/2.0 Mbit/s) and different distances (see Table A-3).

34. Packet-switched data communications network charges

  • Connection, monthly rental charge and call set-up charges for packet-switched data communication (see Table A-4).

Staff

35. Total full-time staff in telecommunications services

  • Full-time staff employed by telecommunication network operators in the country for the provision of public telecommunication services. Part-time staff should be expressed in terms of full-time staff equivalents. As far as possible, staff not working principally for the provision of telecommunications services (e.g., those working in postal services or broadcast operations) should be excluded. An indication of the percentage of functions carried out by contractors could be specified in a footnote.

Revenue and expenses

All items in this section should be reported in national currency at current prices.

36. Total revenues from all telecommunications services

  • This is the total revenue earned and is the sum of items 32-40. This should exclude revenues from non-telecommunications services. Revenue (turnover) consists of telecommunications service earnings during the financial year under review. Revenue should not include monies received in respect of revenue earned during previous financial years, neither does it include monies received by way of loans from governments, or other external investors, nor monies received from repayable subscribers' contributions or deposits.

37. Revenues from telephone connection charges

  • Revenue received for connection (installation) of telephone service. This may include charges for transfer or cessation of service.

38. Revenues from telephone subscription charges

  • Revenues from recurring charges for subscription to PSTN including equipment rentals.

39. Revenues from local and national calls

  • Revenues from local and national long distance telephone calls.

40. Revenues from international calls

  • Revenues for international telephone calls. This should include charges received from subscribers for placing outgoing calls after deduction of the share of this income to be paid to other organizations for outgoing telecommunication traffic (operators of the incoming and possibly transit countries) and after inclusion of income received from foreign telephone operators for completing calls originating in a foreign country. Inpayments and outpayments to foreign telecommunication operators should be listed separately.

41. Revenues from telegram and telex services

  • Revenues for transmittal of telegraphic and telex messages, both national and international.

42. Revenues from other data/text services

  • Revenues from the data and text services such as data communications (e.g., packet switching) but not telegram or telex.

43. Revenue from leased lines

  • Revenues from the provision of leased lines (circuits).

44. Revenue from mobile communications services

  • Revenues from the provision of mobile communications services such cellular, private trunked radio and radio paging. Revenue by each mobile service should be listed separately.

45. Other revenues

  • Any other revenues not accounted for elsewhere for the provision of telecommunication services. Responders should indicate in a note what are the main sources of other telecommunications revenues.

46. Total current expenditure for all telecommunication services

  • Current expenditure means expenditure other than investments; it consequently refers to the running of telecommunication services on an annual basis. It is further sub-divided (see 42 to 46 below).

47. Operational expenditure

  • Operational expenditure would include:
    • salaries, benefits, etc. of operational staff, pensions, and other labour costs,
    • materials for operations including rental of premises, office supplies etc.,
    • research and development costs,
    • marketing and other sales expenses,
    • indirect, non-income taxes,
    • labour and material costs of maintenance and repair of the existing telecommunications systems.

    These items should be listed separately.

48. Interest

  • Interest refers to the financial year for loans associated with fixed and current assets. The sum should be net, that is interest payable by the operator on debts minus the any income gained from investments. Interest received and paid should be listed separately.

49. Income taxes

  • Taxation refers to taxes on the operator's income, expenditure, profit or capital (e.g., corporation tax, income tax) raised by central or local government. This item does not include pay-related (e.g., social) taxes which should be incorporated under current expenditures.

50. Depreciation

  • Depreciation covers the expected devaluation of capital assets insofar as this is regarded as an item of current expenditure. It covers the financial charges made in the year for the loss of value of installed equipment. It is normally calculated on hypotheses based on the useful life of the different categories of equipment.

51. Other expenditures

  • Any other expenditures not connected with operation, depreciation, interest or taxation. This might include for example, non-recurring charges such as restructuring charges or adjustments due to accounting changes.

Investment

The term investment means the expenditure associated with acquiring the ownership of property (including intellectual and non-tangible property such as computer software) and plant. These include expenditure on initial installations and on additions to existing installations where the usage is expected to be over an extended period of time. Also referred to as capital expenditure.

52. Total annual investment in telecommunication including land and buildings

  • The annual investment for acquiring property and plant.

53. Total annual investment in telecommunication excluding land and buildings

  • The annual investment for acquiring plant (e.g., switching equipment, transmission equipment, office machinery, motor vehicles) but not including land or buildings.

54. Annual investment in telephone switching equipment.

  • The annual investment for telephone switching equipment such as local, national (trunk) and international exchanges.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • Department of Telecommunications. Various years. Indian Telecommunication Statistics 1991. New Delhi. Useful example of telecommunications indicator collection for large developing country.

    EUROSTAT. 1994. Telecommunication Indicators. Paper distributed at the ICOBS/AS Working Group Meeting, 12-13 January 1994, Luxembourg.

    Federal Communications Commission. Various years. Statistics of Communications Common Carriers. Washington D.C. Useful examples of aggregation of data from many operating agencies.

    International Monetary Fund. Various years. International Financial Statistics. Washington D.C. Source of macro-economic data.

    ITU. Various years. Yearbook of Statistics. Geneva. Historical raw data of public telecommunication sector for most countries and territories.

    ----. Various years. Africa, Americas, Arab States, Asia-Pacific and Europe Telecommunications Indicators. Geneva. Detailed regional coverage with totals and averages.

    ----. 1994. World Telecommunication Development Report. Geneva. World-wide comparisons.

    ----. 1994. Direction of Traffic. Geneva. International traffic indicators.

    ----. 1993. Training Indicators for TTC. Fourth Telecommunication Training Managers Meeting, Maputo, Mozambique, October 1993. Identification of telecommunication staff training indicators.

    OECD. 1990. Performance Indicators for Public Telecommunication Operators. Paris. Policy-oriented uses of performance indicators.

    OECD. 1993. Communications Outlook 1993. Paris. Policy-oriented uses of performance indicators for OECD member countries.

    Statistics Canada. 1992. A Model Survey for the Telecommunication Sector. In Voorburg Group, Statistics and Final Report, Seventh Meeting on Service Statistics, Williamsburg, USA, October 1992.

    UN Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Various years. Monthly Bulletin of Statistics. New York. Source of population, consumer price index and exchange rate data.

    World Bank. Various years. World Development Report. Washington D.C. Demographic and macro-economic data.

    -----. 1989. Performance Indicators for Telecommunication Services. Telecommunication Technical Note 7. Washington D.C.

ANNEX A. TARIFF SCHEDULES

Table A-1: Sample table for providing national call charges

Charges for PSTN calls at 1 January 1992
Country: Austria
Charges in local currency Business Residential

Fixed Charges
Installation 1200 1200
Rental (per month) 160 160
Free units included 0 0
        
Taxes 0% 0%
Comment: No tax

Call Charge Minimum charge per call Charge per minute
Distance    
3 km 0.80 0.67
7 km 0.80 0.67
12 km 0.80 0.67
17 km 0.80 0.67
22 km 0.80 0.67
27 km 0.80 4.00
40 km 0.80 4.00
75 km 0.80 4.00
110 km 0.80 6.00
135 km 0.80 6.00
175 km 0.80 6.00
250 km 0.80 6.00
350 km 0.80 6.00
490 km 0.80 6.00
cont.

Discounts by time of day or week (as percentage of peak rate)
  Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Sat Sun
  11:00 15:00 20:00 03:00 11:00 13:00
Distances            
3,7 km 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
12 km 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
17 km 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
22 km 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
27 km 100% 100% 67% 67% 67% 67%
40 km 100% 100% 67% 67% 67% 67%
75 km 100% 100% 67% 67% 67% 67%
110, 135, 175 km 100% 100% 67% 67% 67% 67%
250km+ 100% 100% 67% 67% 67% 67%

Note: The same basic tariff information can be used for the business, residential and mobile communications baskets.

Table A-2: Sample table for providing international call charges

(3 minute direct-dialled call in local currency and including any taxes)

  Standard/Peak rate Economy/Discount rate
Country 1    
Country 2    
Country 3    
     
Country n    

Table A-3: Sample table for leased line charges

Charges for leased lines at 1 January 1992
Country: Australia
Charges in local currency
Tax: 0%
Comment: No tax

Connection charge: Distance
Capacity

2 km

20 km

50 km

100 km

200 km

9.6 kbit/s 440.00 440.00 645.00 645.00 645.00
56/64 kbit/s 3000.00 3000.00 3000.00 3000.00 3000.00
1.5/2.0 Mbit/s 5028.00 5028.00 5028.00 5028.00 5028.00

Rental per line per month Distance
Capacity

2 km

20 km

50 km

100 km

200 km

9.6 kbit/s 74.00 225.50 412.50 450.00 525.00
56/64 kbit/s 216.00 303.00 498.00 773.00 782.00
1.5/2.0 Mbit/s 1729.00 3421.00 4962.00 6221.00 7542.00

Table A-4: Sample table for packet-switch (X.25) data communications

Charges for X.25 Packet Switched data communications at 1 January 1992
Country: Australia
Charges in local currency

Connection charge: 1275.00
Rental Charge: 686.00
Tax: 0%
Comment: No tax

 

Local

Long distance

Call set-up charge 0.00 0.00

Charges per segment

Local

Longdistance

Peak rate 0.0012 0.0012
Discount (cheapest) 0.00012 0.00012

Cost per minute

Local

Long distance

Peak rate 0.0063 0.0063
Discount (cheapest) 0.00063 0.00063

ANNEX B. TELEVISION BROADCASTING DEFINITIONS

Television receivers

The total number of television sets in use. Some countries have a licensing scheme where television sets must be registered. Since households may have more than one television receiver or may not register, the number of licensed receivers may understate the true number.

Television households

The number of households that have television receivers. This is not the same as the number of television receivers since households can have more than one receiver and other entities besides households may have receivers (e.g., businesses). Comparable to television licenses as long as there is not widespread avoidance of the licensing scheme.

Homes passed by cable television

The number of homes wired for cable television regardless of whether the occupants are subscribing.

Cable television households / subscribers

The number of cable television subscribers. If countries include Microwave Multi-point Distribution systems (MMDS) or Satellite Master Antenna Television (SMATV) connections this should be explained in a footnote.

Direct to Home satellite antennas

The number of home satellite antennas that can receive television broadcasting directly from satellites.

Multichannel homes

Equal to the number of cable television subscribers plus the number of DTH antennas.

Table B-1: Television broadcasting indicators, Switzerland, 1993

Indicator Note 1993
Population   6'796'840
Households   3'386'000
Television receivers (estimated) 1 2'800'000
Television households (licenses) (TV HH) 2 2'551'244
Television receivers (estimated) per 100 inhabitants 3 41.2
People per television 4 2.4
Per cent of households with television 5 75%
Homes passed by cable (HP) 6 2'121'871
Cable households (Cable HH) 7 1'900'000
Direct-to-home (DTH) satellite broadcasting antennas   142'000
Multichannel homes 8 2'042'000
Cable HH as per cent of TV HH   74%
Cable HH as per cent of HP   90%
Multichannel homes as per cent of TV HH   80%

Note:

1. Assumption being there are more television sets than those registered.

2. Households with televisions. Assumed to be same as the number of licenses issued.

3. Estimated television receivers / population * 100. Used by UNESCO to measure penetration.

4. Population / estimated television receivers. Often used by mass media to measure penetration.

5. Television households / households.

6. Homes that have been wired for cable television.

7. Cable television subscribers.

8. Cable television subscribers plus DTH receivers.

Source: ITU adapted from Societe Europeene des Satellites (SES) and Enterprise des PTT suisses data.

 

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