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 Tuesday, April 20, 2010

A new type of malware infects PCs using file-share sites and publishes the user's net history on a public website before demanding a fee for its removal. The Japanese trojan virus installs itself on computers using a popular file-share service called Winni, used by up to 200m people. It targets those downloading illegal copies of games in the Hentai genre, an explicit form of anime. Website Yomiuri claims that 5500 people have so far admitted to being infected.

"If you find you are getting pop-ups demanding payments to settle copyright infringement lawsuits, ignore them and use a free online anti-malware scanner immediately to check for malware," said Mr Ferguson.

 

(Source: BBC)

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BBC

Tuesday, April 20, 2010 10:45:00 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Police hunting a hacker who had attacked a US school's systems found themselves cornering a "very intelligent" 9 year old instead, it has emerged. When passwords for teachers at Spring Hill Elementary, Virginia, were changed without authorisation the school board initially thought a hacker had broken into the school district's Blackboard system. Police were called in to investigate in mid-March and were quickly able to trace the incident back to a PC at the home of a 9 year-old school student.

The youngster's mother was initially chief suspect in the hack but after speaking to her and and her son police came to the surprising conclusion that they were dealing with a 'kindergarden' hacker.

 

(Source: The Register)

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The Register

Tuesday, April 20, 2010 10:29:05 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, April 19, 2010

A computer security researcher has released a plugin for Firefox that provides a wealth of data on Web sites that may have been compromised with malicious code. The plugin, called Fireshark, was released on Wednesday at the Black Hat conference. The open-source free tool is designed to address the shortcomings in other programs used to analyze malicious Web sites, said Stephan Chenette, a principal security researcher at Websense, which lets Chenette develop Fireshark in the course of his job. Hackers often target legitimate Web sites with code that can either infect a machine with malicious software or redirect a user to a bad Web page.

 

(Source: InfoWorld)

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InfoWorld

Monday, April 19, 2010 1:40:17 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Is it cyberbullying if kids post mean comments and then say they were “just joking”? Is it wrong for a boy to pressure his girlfriend to send racy text messages? For teenagers, these questions don’t necessarily have clear answers. Associated Press MTV is trying to get teens themselves to support each other in standing up to behavior that crosses over into “digital abuse” — use of technologies such as texting and social networking to bully, harass and intimidate people.

The network introduced a new online tool called Over the Line this week that allows young people to post about their problem and have peers say whether the behavior is acceptable. The posts and comments are moderated, to make sure bullying doesn’t become a problem in the tool itself.

 

(Source: The Wall Street Journal)

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The Wall Street Journal

Monday, April 19, 2010 1:23:51 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, April 16, 2010

The report, from researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Pennsylvania, is among the first quantitative studies looking at young people's attitudes toward privacy as government officials and corporate executives alike increasingly grapple with such issues.

Among the findings:

• Most people — 86 percent — believe that anyone who posts a photo or video of them on the Internet should get their permission first, even if that photo was taken in public. Among young adults 18 to 24, 84 percent agreed — not far from the 90 percent among those 45 to 54.

• Forty percent of adults ages 18 to 24 believe executives should face jail time if their company uses someone's personal information illegally — the same as the response among those 35 to 44 years old.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Friday, April 16, 2010 10:39:04 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Africa's spending in IT security has risen and is expected to continue growing as more people access affordable connectivity and companies embrace smartphones and social media in work places. According to IDC, Africa's IT spending is high compared to the GDP, with South Africa leading with IT security spending of 3.8 percent of its GDP. Mauritius, Morocco spend 1.1 percent of GDP on IT security while Egypt, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Ethiopia spend less than 1 percent.

"The focus from criminals is to steal data and monetize that; they blend their attacks across multiple vectors; URL lists and signature based security mechanisms cannot keep up with zero-day threats," said Mike Hibbert, director for Websense in Africa.

 

(Source: IDG Magazines)

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IDG Magazines

Friday, April 16, 2010 10:30:19 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, April 15, 2010

Microsoft today patched 25 vulnerabilities in Windows, Exchange and Office, including nine marked "critical," the company's highest threat ranking. But researchers were unanimous in urging users to immediately apply two of the 11 updates, which address major bugs in Windows Media Player and an important video file format, to block drive-by attacks that will quickly spread on the Web.

The patches also fixed eight flaws pegged as "important," the next-lowest step in Microsoft's four-stage scoring system, and another eight tagged as "moderate." Five of today's 11 update packages were marked critical, while five were labeled important and the remaining one as moderate. Security experts directed users' attention to a pair of updates that addressed issues in Windows' media infrastructure.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Thursday, April 15, 2010 1:20:52 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Facebook is employing aggressive legal means in combination with technical measures in order to stop hackers from abusing its social-networking site, according to its chief security officer, Max Kelly. Facebook Chief Security Officer Max KellyThe company is constantly under fire from hackers trying to spam its 400 million registered users, harvest their data or run other scams. Facebook's security team started off with just a few people, said Kelly, who began working at Facebook in 2005 after a stint as an FBI computer forensic analyst.

As many as 10% of Facebook's 1,200 employees are involved in security-related functions for the site, Kelly said. Its core security team consists of 20 people, a site integrity team of around 15 people and 200 others who are part of a user operations team that monitors illegal activity.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Thursday, April 15, 2010 1:17:52 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Two senators yesterday introduced a bill that seeks to build a multilateral framework to mitigate and respond to disrupting cyber attacks.

The bill, sponsored by Sens. John Kerry, D-Mass., and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., would create an ambassador-rank coordinator position at the State Department that would advise the secretary of State on international cyberspace and cybersecurity issues. The coordinator would promote development of a strategy for international cyber engagement, including considering the utility of negotiating a multilateral framework that would provide internationally acceptable principles to mitigate cyberwarfare.

 

(Source: Federal Times)

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Federal Times

 

Wednesday, April 14, 2010 4:38:21 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Cell phones, texting, IM, e-mail, Facebook, MySpace -- kids are interconnected today in ways hardly imagined two decades ago. But these technology-based communication platforms also enable new forms of an age-old parenting strategy: monitoring your kids.

Is it any easier to put the proper measures in place to ensure your child's security since you already have an expertise in this area? Or do you go overboard because of you are hyperattuned to risk? And what is the right balance of freedom and guidance to provide for kids? Turns out it was tricky issue before social networking, and remains tricky now. Here are views and strategies collected from an array of security professionals.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Wednesday, April 14, 2010 4:33:59 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, April 13, 2010

A British child protection agency said it has pressed Facebook to add "panic buttons" to its pages after the murder of a teenager was linked to the site. Jim Gamble, chief executive of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP), said the social networking giant did not agree to his demands outright at a meeting in Washington but he felt they were moving in the right direction. Speaking after a four-hour meeting Monday, Gamble said Facebook was close to "doing the right thing" but urged the website to turn "words into action."

Calls have since grown for the inclusion of the buttons -- which allow youngsters who feel threatened online to quickly contact a number of sources of help, such as CEOP or anti-bullying helplines. Politicians, police and anti-bullying groups have voiced outrage that the online giant will not bow to demands to include the system.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Tuesday, April 13, 2010 10:05:22 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, April 12, 2010

The case of a teenager in Massachusetts who killed herself after a relentless, months-long bullying campaign shows how the common schoolyard behavior is evolving in dangerous new ways online.

Six students face felony charges in the death of Phoebe Prince, 15, who hanged herself in January after being subjected to verbal assault and threats of physical harm. Some harassment occurred online on Facebook, in text messages and in other high-tech forms, a contemporary development in the age-old practice, experts said.

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters

Monday, April 12, 2010 2:18:11 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

In a decision that could set new ground rules for Internet privacy in the workplace, New Jersey's Supreme Court has ruled an employer was wrong in retrieving e-mails between a former employee and her attorney, even though they were sent from a company computer.

"Courts are looking more closely at privacy claims in the digital worklplace," said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a Washington, D.C.-based public-interest research group. "Just because a person is using a company computer doesn't mean they leave all their rights to privacy at the door."

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Monday, April 12, 2010 2:15:07 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, April 08, 2010

Suing your parents isn't just for celebrities anymore--a 16-year-old Arkansas boy is suing his mother for hacking into his Facebook account and allegedly posting slanderous remarks. ATV-TV reports that Denise New of Arkadelphia is facing harassment charges from her 16-year-old. Her son, who lives with his grandmother, also requested a no-contact order. Prior to this issue, New and her son reportedly had a "great relationship," despite their living arrangements.

According to the boy, his mother hacked into his Facebook and email accounts, then changed both passwords. She also allegedly posted remarks that involved slander and information about his personal life. New admits to changing the passwords, but denies hacking--she claims he left his account logged in on her computer.

 

(Source: PC World)

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PC World

Thursday, April 08, 2010 3:38:20 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, April 06, 2010

Link-shortening services such as TinyURL seem ideal for criminals because they can disguise the names of malicious sites. Yet on Twitter — one of the most popular places for them — they may not be nearly as malicious as many industry experts fear, according to new security research. Zscaler Inc., a company that sells security services, studied 1.3 million shortened links taken from Twitter over two weeks, before Twitter began in early March to examine such links for malicious content.

Just 773 of those links — a mere 0.06 percent — led to malicious content. Link-shortening services convert long Web addresses into shorter ones. They have become more popular as people spend more time on social-networking sites and share with their friends links to photos, news articles and other tidbits. They are especially important on Twitter, which restricts its posts to 140 characters.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Tuesday, April 06, 2010 4:33:56 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, March 26, 2010

One of the world's most notorious computer hackers was sentenced to 20 years in prison on Thursday after he pleaded guilty to helping run a global ring that stole tens of millions of payment card numbers. Albert Gonzalez, a 28-year-old college dropout from Miami, had confessed to helping lead a ring that stole more than 40 million payment card numbers by breaking into retailers including TJX Cos Inc, BJ's Wholesale Club Inc and Barnes & Noble.

It was the harshest sentence ever handed down for a computer crime in an American court, said Mark Rasch, former head of the computer crimes unit at the U.S. Department of Justice. Gonzalez and conspirators scattered across the globe caused some $200 million in damages to those businesses, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Heymann.

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters

Friday, March 26, 2010 4:28:35 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, March 25, 2010

Four countries and two territories have won preliminary approval to have Internet addresses written entirely in their native scripts as early as this summer.

Rules are being developed to make sure that addresses in either script go to the same Web sites. Since their creation in the 1980s, Internet domain names such as those that end in ".com" have been limited to 37 characters: the 10 numerals, the hyphen and the 26 letters in the Latin alphabet used in English. Technical tricks have been used to allow portions of the Internet address to use other scripts, but until now, the suffix had to use those 37 characters.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Thursday, March 25, 2010 4:34:12 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Countries in Asia now face the same level and type of sophisticated cyber attack as countries in the West, according to a new report from non-profit US cyber-crime research organisation Team Cymru.

Countries in Asia now face the same level and type of sophisticated cyber attack as countries in the West, according to a new report from non-profit US cyber-crime research organisation Team Cymru. "We would expect to see high concentrations of compromised machines in areas with high concentrations of Internet saturation and urban population," said Team Cymru director, global outreach, and former Scotland Yard detective, Steve Santorelli.

 

(Source: IDG Connect)

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IDG Connect

Wednesday, March 24, 2010 3:07:54 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, March 23, 2010

International police agency Interpol launched Monday a "most wanted" site for suspected child sex offenders across the Group of Eight (G8) most industrialised nations. The "G8 Wanted Child Sex Offender" site, accessible via Interpol's homepage (www.interpol.int), draws together information from G8 members the United States, Canada, Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Russia.

It includes photographs of people wanted on charges of abuse and enables the public to access to information about how to report missing sex offenders who may have crossed borders.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Tuesday, March 23, 2010 4:13:20 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, March 22, 2010

In a bid to cut down on fraud and inappropriate content, the organization responsible for administering Russia's .ru top-level domain names is tightening its procedures. Starting April 1, anyone who registers a .ru domain will need to provide a copy of their passport or, for businesses, legal registration papers.

Loopholes in the domain name system help spammers, scammers and operators of pornographic Web sites to avoid detection on the Internet by concealing their identity. Criminals often play a cat-and-mouse game with law enforcement and security experts, popping up on different domains as soon as their malicious servers are identified. Criminals in eastern Europe have used .ru domains for a while, registering domain names under fake identities and using them to send spam or set up command-and-control servers to send instructions to networks of hacked computers.

 

(Source: PC World)

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PC World

Monday, March 22, 2010 4:23:19 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     |