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 Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Two senators yesterday introduced a bill that seeks to build a multilateral framework to mitigate and respond to disrupting cyber attacks.

The bill, sponsored by Sens. John Kerry, D-Mass., and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., would create an ambassador-rank coordinator position at the State Department that would advise the secretary of State on international cyberspace and cybersecurity issues. The coordinator would promote development of a strategy for international cyber engagement, including considering the utility of negotiating a multilateral framework that would provide internationally acceptable principles to mitigate cyberwarfare.

 

(Source: Federal Times)

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Federal Times

 

Wednesday, April 14, 2010 4:38:21 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Cell phones, texting, IM, e-mail, Facebook, MySpace -- kids are interconnected today in ways hardly imagined two decades ago. But these technology-based communication platforms also enable new forms of an age-old parenting strategy: monitoring your kids.

Is it any easier to put the proper measures in place to ensure your child's security since you already have an expertise in this area? Or do you go overboard because of you are hyperattuned to risk? And what is the right balance of freedom and guidance to provide for kids? Turns out it was tricky issue before social networking, and remains tricky now. Here are views and strategies collected from an array of security professionals.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Wednesday, April 14, 2010 4:33:59 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, April 13, 2010

A British child protection agency said it has pressed Facebook to add "panic buttons" to its pages after the murder of a teenager was linked to the site. Jim Gamble, chief executive of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP), said the social networking giant did not agree to his demands outright at a meeting in Washington but he felt they were moving in the right direction. Speaking after a four-hour meeting Monday, Gamble said Facebook was close to "doing the right thing" but urged the website to turn "words into action."

Calls have since grown for the inclusion of the buttons -- which allow youngsters who feel threatened online to quickly contact a number of sources of help, such as CEOP or anti-bullying helplines. Politicians, police and anti-bullying groups have voiced outrage that the online giant will not bow to demands to include the system.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Tuesday, April 13, 2010 10:05:22 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, April 12, 2010

The case of a teenager in Massachusetts who killed herself after a relentless, months-long bullying campaign shows how the common schoolyard behavior is evolving in dangerous new ways online.

Six students face felony charges in the death of Phoebe Prince, 15, who hanged herself in January after being subjected to verbal assault and threats of physical harm. Some harassment occurred online on Facebook, in text messages and in other high-tech forms, a contemporary development in the age-old practice, experts said.

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters

Monday, April 12, 2010 2:18:11 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

In a decision that could set new ground rules for Internet privacy in the workplace, New Jersey's Supreme Court has ruled an employer was wrong in retrieving e-mails between a former employee and her attorney, even though they were sent from a company computer.

"Courts are looking more closely at privacy claims in the digital worklplace," said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a Washington, D.C.-based public-interest research group. "Just because a person is using a company computer doesn't mean they leave all their rights to privacy at the door."

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Monday, April 12, 2010 2:15:07 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, April 08, 2010

Suing your parents isn't just for celebrities anymore--a 16-year-old Arkansas boy is suing his mother for hacking into his Facebook account and allegedly posting slanderous remarks. ATV-TV reports that Denise New of Arkadelphia is facing harassment charges from her 16-year-old. Her son, who lives with his grandmother, also requested a no-contact order. Prior to this issue, New and her son reportedly had a "great relationship," despite their living arrangements.

According to the boy, his mother hacked into his Facebook and email accounts, then changed both passwords. She also allegedly posted remarks that involved slander and information about his personal life. New admits to changing the passwords, but denies hacking--she claims he left his account logged in on her computer.

 

(Source: PC World)

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PC World

Thursday, April 08, 2010 3:38:20 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, April 06, 2010

Link-shortening services such as TinyURL seem ideal for criminals because they can disguise the names of malicious sites. Yet on Twitter one of the most popular places for them they may not be nearly as malicious as many industry experts fear, according to new security research. Zscaler Inc., a company that sells security services, studied 1.3 million shortened links taken from Twitter over two weeks, before Twitter began in early March to examine such links for malicious content.

Just 773 of those links a mere 0.06 percent led to malicious content. Link-shortening services convert long Web addresses into shorter ones. They have become more popular as people spend more time on social-networking sites and share with their friends links to photos, news articles and other tidbits. They are especially important on Twitter, which restricts its posts to 140 characters.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Tuesday, April 06, 2010 4:33:56 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, March 26, 2010

One of the world's most notorious computer hackers was sentenced to 20 years in prison on Thursday after he pleaded guilty to helping run a global ring that stole tens of millions of payment card numbers. Albert Gonzalez, a 28-year-old college dropout from Miami, had confessed to helping lead a ring that stole more than 40 million payment card numbers by breaking into retailers including TJX Cos Inc, BJ's Wholesale Club Inc and Barnes & Noble.

It was the harshest sentence ever handed down for a computer crime in an American court, said Mark Rasch, former head of the computer crimes unit at the U.S. Department of Justice. Gonzalez and conspirators scattered across the globe caused some $200 million in damages to those businesses, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Heymann.

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters

Friday, March 26, 2010 4:28:35 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, March 25, 2010

Four countries and two territories have won preliminary approval to have Internet addresses written entirely in their native scripts as early as this summer.

Rules are being developed to make sure that addresses in either script go to the same Web sites. Since their creation in the 1980s, Internet domain names such as those that end in ".com" have been limited to 37 characters: the 10 numerals, the hyphen and the 26 letters in the Latin alphabet used in English. Technical tricks have been used to allow portions of the Internet address to use other scripts, but until now, the suffix had to use those 37 characters.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Thursday, March 25, 2010 4:34:12 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Countries in Asia now face the same level and type of sophisticated cyber attack as countries in the West, according to a new report from non-profit US cyber-crime research organisation Team Cymru.

Countries in Asia now face the same level and type of sophisticated cyber attack as countries in the West, according to a new report from non-profit US cyber-crime research organisation Team Cymru. "We would expect to see high concentrations of compromised machines in areas with high concentrations of Internet saturation and urban population," said Team Cymru director, global outreach, and former Scotland Yard detective, Steve Santorelli.

 

(Source: IDG Connect)

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IDG Connect

Wednesday, March 24, 2010 3:07:54 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, March 23, 2010

International police agency Interpol launched Monday a "most wanted" site for suspected child sex offenders across the Group of Eight (G8) most industrialised nations. The "G8 Wanted Child Sex Offender" site, accessible via Interpol's homepage (www.interpol.int), draws together information from G8 members the United States, Canada, Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Russia.

It includes photographs of people wanted on charges of abuse and enables the public to access to information about how to report missing sex offenders who may have crossed borders.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Tuesday, March 23, 2010 4:13:20 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, March 22, 2010

In a bid to cut down on fraud and inappropriate content, the organization responsible for administering Russia's .ru top-level domain names is tightening its procedures. Starting April 1, anyone who registers a .ru domain will need to provide a copy of their passport or, for businesses, legal registration papers.

Loopholes in the domain name system help spammers, scammers and operators of pornographic Web sites to avoid detection on the Internet by concealing their identity. Criminals often play a cat-and-mouse game with law enforcement and security experts, popping up on different domains as soon as their malicious servers are identified. Criminals in eastern Europe have used .ru domains for a while, registering domain names under fake identities and using them to send spam or set up command-and-control servers to send instructions to networks of hacked computers.

 

(Source: PC World)

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PC World

Monday, March 22, 2010 4:23:19 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, March 19, 2010

Hollywood and Bollywood linked arms Thursday to fight piracy, with the announcement of a coalition among the Motion Picture Association of America and seven Indian companies to tackle counterfeiting in one of the world's largest film markets.

The alliance comes as Hollywood tries to tap global markets more aggressively and as Indian movie studios grow in size and stature narrowing the gap between Indian and U.S. filmmakers, who have not always seen eye-to-eye on intellectual property issues. A year in the making, the coalition to fight film piracy in India will work with movie theaters to crack down on camcorder piracy the source of 90 percent of all pirated DVDs with police to tighten enforcement, with Internet service providers to fight Internet piracy and with politicians to create more effective laws.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Friday, March 19, 2010 2:56:17 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, March 18, 2010

Spam levels have not been dented by a series of strikes against controllers of networks of hijacked computers. Early 2010 has seen four such networks, or botnets, tackled via arrests, net access cutoffs and by infiltrating command systems. The successes have not inconvenienced hi-tech criminals who found other routes to send spam, say experts. And, they add, despite falling response rates, spam remains too lucrative for criminals to abandon.

"Most non-commercial spam these days is aimed solely to get you to click on a link, even out of curiosity," he said. "As soon as you click on that link, you're infected, most likely to become yet another botnet victim, have your identity and information stolen and go on to participate, all unknowingly in the infection of further victims."

 

(Source: BBC)

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BBC

Thursday, March 18, 2010 5:52:56 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, March 16, 2010

At the eighth Ministerial eHealth Conference in Barcelona today, EU ministers have outlined a joint vision and policy priorities on how to make eHealth more accessible, interactive and customised to patients. The Declaration outlines a vision and identifies key objectives to be achieved in the next ten years.

The Declaration calls for policy coordination amongst the various areas where eHealth can have an impact on citizens' health in order to enhance benefits for patients, healthcare systems and society. It recognises the need for stronger synergies with policy areas like competitiveness, research and regional development both at European and national levels.

 

(Source: Europe's Information Society)

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Europe's Information Society

Tuesday, March 16, 2010 3:23:29 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, March 15, 2010

The government has added fresh resources to the fight against cybercrime with the launch of a 4.3m programme to help combat fraud, estimated to cost UK consumers 3.5bn per year. The programme, which aims to take down scam websites, was launched by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills this week. Under the scheme, up to 300 of the UK's approximately 3,000 existing trading standards officers will receive "intermediate" level training in tackling cybercrime.

In addition, a new cyber enforcement team within the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) will be set up. The team will lead investigations into websites selling fake or non-existent goods, tickets or services online, and will have an attached digital forensics lab that will be available to all OFT staff.

 

(Source: Silicon)

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Silicon

Monday, March 15, 2010 6:35:59 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     |