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 Monday, February 22, 2010

There are two aspects you have to consider when negotiating security and privacy with a service provider. First, you have to have the correct principles encoded in your contract. Second, you have to worry about how well they are executed by the provider. If you read most service contracts you will see that "law enforcement assistance" sections are usually vague. It is up to you to negotiate terms that address key issues of data protection and safeguard your rights:

* Demand that law enforcement requests are properly documented. Show me the warrant. A phone call from agent Bob at headquarters is not a warrant.

* Demand that you are notified of any requests that may affect your data. You have the right to contest warrants in court and most corporations do contest them.

* Demand that each data access request, whether granted or not is documented.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Monday, February 22, 2010 6:41:57 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

An online survey of 895 Web users and experts found more than three-quarters believe the Internet will make people smarter in the next 10 years, according to results released on Friday. Most of the respondents also said the Internet would improve reading and writing by 2020, according to the study, conducted by the Imagining the Internet Center at Elon University in North Carolina and the Pew Internet and American Life project.

"Three out of four experts said our use of the Internet enhances and augments human intelligence, and two-thirds said use of the Internet has improved reading, writing and the rendering of knowledge," said study co-author Janna Anderson, director of the Imagining the Internet Center.

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters

Monday, February 22, 2010 4:55:30 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, February 19, 2010

A former security researcher turned criminal hacker has been sentenced to 13 years in federal prison for hacking into financial institutions and stealing credit card account numbers.

Max Ray Butler, who used the hacker pseudonym Iceman, was sentenced Friday morning in U.S. District Court in Pittsburgh on charges of wire fraud and identity theft. In addition to his 13-year sentence, Butler will face five years of supervised release and must pay US$27.5 million in restitution to his victims, according to Assistant U.S. Attorney Luke Dembosky, who prosecuted the case for the federal government. Dembosky believes the 13 year sentence is the longest-ever handed down for hacking charges.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Friday, February 19, 2010 5:00:14 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, February 18, 2010

A new type of computer virus is known to have breached almost 75,000 computers in 2,500 organizations around the world, including user accounts of popular social network websites, according Internet security firm NetWitness. The latest virus -- known as "Kneber botnet" -- gathers login credentials to online financial systems, social networking sites and email systems from infested computers and reports the information back to hackers, NetWitness said in a statement.

A botnet is an army of infected computers that hackers can control from a central machine." The company said the attack was first discovered in January during a routine deployment of NetWitness software.

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters

Thursday, February 18, 2010 6:27:13 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, February 17, 2010

A common Web programming error could give hackers a way to take over Google Buzz accounts, a security expert said Tuesday. The flaw is a "medium-sized problem" with the Buzz for Mobile Web site, said Robert Hansen, CEO of SecTheory, who first reported the issue. This type of Web programming error, called a cross-site scripting flaw, lets the attacker put his own scripting code into Web pages that belong to trusted Web sites such as Google.com. It is a fairly common flaw but one that can have major consequences when exploited on widely used Web sites.

The attacker "can force you to say things you don't want to say, to follow people," he said. "Whatever Google Buzz allows you to do, it allows him to do to you."

 

(Source: PC World)

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PC World

Wednesday, February 17, 2010 3:08:44 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, February 15, 2010

A man has appeared before magistrates in Truro charged with four sex offences following an investigation into children being groomed on the internet. Michael Williams, 28, of Tresooth Lane, Penryn, was charged with sexual assault and grooming a girl under 16 and two counts of making indecent images. The inquiry centres around pupils from Falmouth School and Penryn College. Mr Williams, who was remanded in custody, is not a teacher and is not directly connected with the schools. Letters have been sent to parents of pupils at Falmouth School and Penryn College informing them of the investigation.

 

(Source: BBC)

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BBC

Monday, February 15, 2010 2:25:10 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Former top US intelligence officials will become cyberwarriors on Tuesday in a simulation of how the US government would respond to a massive cyberattack on the United States. "The scenario itself is secret," said Eileen McMenamin, vice president of communications for the Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC), which is hosting the event dubbed "Cyber ShockWave." "The participants don't even know what it is," McMenamin told AFP. "None of them know what's going to transpire."

Former president George W. Bush's Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff will play the role of National Security Advisor to the president while former Director of National Intelligence John Negroponte will be Secretary of State.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Monday, February 15, 2010 1:50:01 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, February 12, 2010

50% of European teenagers give out personal information on the web according to an EU study which can remain online forever and can be seen by anybody. Today, Safer Internet Day, the European Commission is passing a message to teenagers: "Think before you post!" It welcomed actions to protect children using social networking websites taken by the 20 companies who signed the Safer Social Networking Principles last year (IP/09/232 ).

Most of these companies have empowered minors to tackle online risks by making it easier to change privacy settings, block users or delete unwanted comments and content. Yet more needs to be done to protect children online, the Commission says. Less than half of social networking companies (40%) make profiles of under-18 users visible only to their friends by default and only one third replied to user reports asking for help.

 

(Source: Europa)

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Europa

Friday, February 12, 2010 2:22:27 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, February 11, 2010

The government has called on the mobile phone industry to do more to protect handset owners against theft. Alan Campbell, Minister for Crime Prevention, said firms "have a social and a corporate responsibility to tackle crime". Around 2% of British mobile phone users report they have suffered a theft in the last year, although for teenagers the figure is three times higher.

The government's call comes as the Home Office unveiled the winning designs in a crime prevention contest, aimed at making mobile phones less attractive to thieves. Designs included an alarm that sounds when a phone is too far from its owner and locks the handset.

 

(Source: BBC)

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BBC

Thursday, February 11, 2010 6:11:24 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, February 09, 2010

Deep inside millions of computers is a digital Fort Knox, a special chip with the locks to highly guarded secrets, including classified government reports and confidential business plans. Now a former U.S. Army computer-security specialist has devised a way to break those locks.

The attack can force heavily secured computers to spill documents that likely were presumed to be safe. This discovery shows one way that spies and other richly financed attackers can acquire military and trade secrets, and comes as worries about state-sponsored computer espionage intensify, underscored by recent hacking attacks on Google Inc.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Tuesday, February 09, 2010 11:45:28 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, February 08, 2010

China has closed what it claims to be the largest hacker training website in the country and arrested three of its members, domestic media reported on Monday.

The "Black Hawk Safety Net" website taught hacking techniques and provided malicious software downloads for its 12,000 members in exchange for a fee, the Wuhan Evening News newspaper reported this weekend, citing police in Huanggang, just east of Wuhan.

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters

Monday, February 08, 2010 7:04:37 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Nearly 500 teachers are meeting in Seville to celebrate the fifth anniversary of eTwinning, an action that creates online communities of teachers and schools across Europe. Through eTwinning, over 85 000 teachers from across Europe work together in international school activities involving more than 50 000 schools in 32 European countries. In the five years of its existence, eTwinning has grown from being a partner-finding tool for teachers to become a rich, Europe-wide community of teaching and learning ( www.etwinning.net ).

On 5 February, a prize ceremony is being held for 37 schools from 21 countries that are the top winners of this year's eTwinning Awards for excellence in eTwinning.

 

(Source: Europa)

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Europa

Monday, February 08, 2010 4:18:10 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, February 04, 2010

Twitter required some users to reset their passwords on Tuesday after discovering that their log-in information may have been harvested via security-compromised torrent Web sites, the company said.

For years, a malicious hacker has been setting up file-sharing torrent sites that appear legitimate and then selling them to well-meaning buyers who want to own their own download site, explained Del Harvey, Twitter's director of trust and safety, in a blog post. However, the sites are riddled with malware and backdoors that allow the malicious hacker to steal log-in credentials -- like e-mail addresses, usernames and passwords -- from users who sign up for them.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Thursday, February 04, 2010 5:27:26 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, February 02, 2010

Facebook and Twitter users are under attack by cybercriminals -- and the incidents are rising, Sophos says in its its 2010 Security Threat Report released Monday. In the past 12 months, Sophos says, cybercriminals have focused more attacks on social-network users. Spam and malware are leading the charge.

Fifty-seven percent of users surveyed reported getting spammed via social-networking sites -- an increase of 70.6 percent from 2008. And 36 percent say they have been sent malware via social-networking sites, a 69.8 percent increase.

 

(Source: NewsFactor Network)

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NewsFactor Network

Tuesday, February 02, 2010 5:46:41 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, January 28, 2010

China will gradually move to cut censorship of the Internet, but it will take a long time, the man credited with inventing the World Wide Web said Wednesday.

Commenting on Google's threat to pull out of China, Tim Berners-Lee said Beijing was having to move "carefully" in opening up Internet openness, but said the "genie is out of the bottle" in terms of access. "I think that openness increases steadily. Every time you open it the genie comes out of the bottle and it's very difficult to put it (back) in the bottle," he told AFP. Speaking on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, he said: "The Internet has a tradition of bit by bit increasing openness.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Thursday, January 28, 2010 3:54:03 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, January 27, 2010

The design of the future German identity card has been unveiled. Credit-card sized and made of polycarbonate, it will be issued from November 2010 on. The new card aims to ease the citizens' transactions with government and businesses and to increase security as well as to enhance public confidence in electronic services.

The front side has the image of the federal eagle, whereas on its reverse side the Brandenburg Gate is depicted. The new card contains numerous security features in order to increase protection against forgery. A special feature is that the holder's details are digitally stored. It is also capable to carry a digital signature. Both features will allow card holders to complete commercial online transactions as well as official business with government offices.

 

(Source: eGov Monitor)

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eGov Monitor

Wednesday, January 27, 2010 1:58:51 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, January 26, 2010

If you have thousands of friends on Facebook, most of them are not your real friends, reports The Sunday Times of London.

According to a recent study by Oxford University professor of Evolutionary Anthropology Robin Dunbar, a human brain is limited to keeping up with about 150 meaningful relationships, regardless of how many Facebook friends you might have. This is in line with Dunbar's earlier research on the matter, in which he concludes that there exists a theoretical "sweet spot" for the number of relationships a human can effectively manage. Throughout history, people have formed social groupings of about 150, as larger groupings quickly begin to deteriorate and lose social cohesion.

 

(Source: PC World)

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PC World

Tuesday, January 26, 2010 1:57:03 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     |