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 Wednesday, November 25, 2009

In today’s technologically advanced world, documents and correspondences that were once sent by post are now exchanged electronically. This exchange takes place smoothly until a signature is required in the transaction. Then the entire process falls back to the real ‘e-less’ world of paper documents, faxes, snail-mail and even physical presence.

Technology, however, has not ceased to search for solutions to this barrier. The result: a method that is accurate and arguably more secure than the traditional handwritten signature, which allows documents to be signed online — e-signatures.

 

(Source: Business Today)

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Business Today

Wednesday, November 25, 2009 3:13:38 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

That television set you discourage your children from watching may not be the greatest threat to their wellbeing. Instead, the mobile phone is the gateway in introducing children to the world of cyberspace, posing a great risk to their safety, a lobby group said Tuesday.

According to The Cradle, the unmonitored use of technology is increasingly exposing youngsters to the risk of harm and violence. "Only 24 per cent of children in the study reported to their parents or an authority of online or cell phone harassment,” Cradle programme manager Brian Weke told journalists. The study also revealed that 77 out of the 96, who had the incidences reported to them, took no action and ignored the seriousness of the matter.

 

(Source: Daily Nation)

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Daily Nation

Wednesday, November 25, 2009 10:51:54 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Four men, including the self-proclaimed "Godfather of Spam," were sentenced to prison on Monday for their roles in an email stock fraud scheme, the Justice Department said. FBI special agent said Ralsky, the self-proclaimed "Godfather of Spam," flooded email boxes with unwanted spam email and attempted to use a botnet to hijack computers to assist them in the scheme. A botnet is a network of computers infected by malicious software.

"Today's sentencing sends a powerful message to spammers whose goal is to manipulate financial transactions and the stock market through illegal email advertisements," said assistant attorney general Lanny Breuer.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

 

Tuesday, November 24, 2009 4:23:01 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, November 23, 2009

A Canadian woman on long-term sick leave for depression says she lost her benefits because her insurance agent found photos of her on Facebook in which she appeared to be having fun.

Nathalie Blanchard has been on leave from her job at IBM in Bromont, Quebec, for the last year. The Canadian Broadcasting Corp. reported Saturday she was diagnosed with major depression and was receiving monthly sick-leave benefits from insurance giant Manulife. But the payments dried up this fall and when Blanchard called Manulife, she says she was told she was available to work because of Facebook.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Monday, November 23, 2009 2:53:42 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

A series of skimming crimes that hit the Nashville, TN area recently is but one of many ATM fraud schemes preying upon financial institutions and their customers.

Nashville police reported last week that they were investigating an ATM card skimming scheme where at least 600 individuals were potential victims. Investigators say five Bank of America ATMs were hit, as well as an unknown number of US Bank machines. A total of 60 people had fraudulent withdrawals from their accounts for anywhere between $100 to $5,000 dollars. Investigators suspect that the skimming schemers have now moved on to other cities. "No one vendor or ATM type is more susceptible over another," Ipson says, "so everyone needs to be aware of this threat."

 

(Source: Bank Info Security)

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Bank Info Security

Monday, November 23, 2009 2:02:40 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, November 19, 2009

A self-proclaimed geek from the age of 14, Andre DiMino had always been interested in computers and networking. But it wasn't until he entered his professional life many years later that he became interested in the security side of that world.

Just five years ago, hunting botnets, said DiMino, was a much different game. The botnets were fairly straightforward, he said, and the primary method of communication was the IRC (Internet Relay Chat). DiMino and other volunteers were able to act like criminals by joining a botnet, watching its traffic to get an understanding of how it was architected and learn more its particular function. They found their efforts were worthwhile as they began contacting network hosts, alerting them that were supporting the botnets and seeing them shutdown.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Thursday, November 19, 2009 5:39:46 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

The world's biggest social networking site has brushed off criticism by a senior UK police officer responsible for preventing online bullying that it is failing to combat abuse.

Jim Gamble, head of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection (Ceop) Center, said Facebook and MySpace, which between them have more than 500 million users, could work harder to stamp out bullying. The initiative came as UK charity Beatbullying highlighted Bebo, owned by AOL, and Microsoft's instant messaging service as hotspots for bullying. In a poll of 2,094 young people across England conducted by the charity, 30 percent of 11 to 16-year-olds who had been "cyberbullied" had been targeted on Bebo.

 

(Source: CNN)

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CNN

Thursday, November 19, 2009 11:48:17 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Cyber war has moved from fiction to fact, says a report. Compiled by security firm McAfee, it bases its conclusion on analysis of recent net-based attacks. Analysis of the motives of the actors behind many attacks carried out via the internet showed that many were mounted with a explicitly political aim.

It said that many nations were now arming to defend themselves in a cyber war and readying forces to conduct their own attacks. "There are at least five countries known to be arming themselves for this kind of conflict," said Greg Day, primary analyst for security at McAfee Europe. The UK, Germany, France, China and North Korea are known to be developing their own capabilities.

 

(Source: BBC)

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BBC

Wednesday, November 18, 2009 2:56:40 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

The first applications were accepted on Monday for internationalised domain names (IDNs), in one of the most significant steps to making the Internet more accessible around the globe.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has opened the application process, ending the exclusive use of Latin characters for website addresses. On the first day, "we have already received six applications from around the world for three different scripts," ICANN CEO Rod Beckstrom told an Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Egypt's Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Wednesday, November 18, 2009 10:10:45 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, November 16, 2009

Criminal gangs are making millions of dollars out of the H1N1 flu pandemic by selling fake flu drugs over the internet, a web security firm said on Monday.

Sophos, a British security software firm said it had intercepted hundreds of millions of fake pharmaceutical spam adverts and websites this year, many of them trying to sell counterfeit antiviral drugs like Tamiflu to worried customers. Tamiflu, an antiviral marketed by Switzerland's Roche Holding and known generically as oseltamivir, is the frontline drug recommended by the World Health Organization to treat and slow the progression of flu symptoms. GlaxoSmithKline makes another antiviral for flu, known as Relenza.

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters 

Monday, November 16, 2009 5:32:31 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

A new spam campaign is targeting a financial transfer system that handles trillions of dollars in transactions annually and has proved to be a fertile target of late for online fraudsters.

The spam messages pretend to come from the National Automated Clearing House Association (NACHA), a U.S. nonprofit association that oversees the Automated Clearing House system (ACH). ACH is a widely used but aging system used by financial institutions for exchanging details of direct deposits, checks and cash transfers made by businesses and individuals. In 2002, ACH was used for nearly 9 billion transactions worth more than $24.4 trillion.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Monday, November 16, 2009 4:31:37 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, November 13, 2009

Testing a brand new copy of Windows 7 shows that malware still finds its way around inbuilt preventative measures.

Got Windows 7? Yes, we know an increasing number of you have. But you'll still need antivirus protection. A test by the security company Sophos has found that Windows 7 is, out of the box, vulnerable to 8 out of 10 viruses that dropped into its feed (its feed being gnarly viruses picked from the internet). But of those 8, the User Account Control (UAC) - meant to save you from yourself, you button-clicking obsessive, you - did stop one.

 

(Source: Guardian)

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Guardian

Friday, November 13, 2009 6:00:27 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Nearly half of England's 14-year-olds have been a victim of bullying and cyber-bullying is now the joint most common form, according to new research.

The Government-commissioned research, conducted by the National Centre for Social Research, analysed bullying among more than 10,000 secondary school pupils in England aged 14-16. The initial findings show that 47 per cent of young people report being bullied at the age of 14. After cyberbullying - where children face taunts, threats and insults via the internet and mobile phones - and name calling, the most common type of bullying was teenagers being threatened with violence, being excluded by their friends and facing actual violence.

 

(Source: Telegraph)

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Telegraph

Friday, November 13, 2009 11:06:28 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, November 12, 2009

For the last few days, some jailbroken iPhone users have found their home screen background a little different than they remembered. A hacker, going by the name "ikee," created a worm that changes the home screen background on jailbroken iPhones whose owners failed to change the default password after installing SSH.

Simply jailbreaking your iPhone will not make you vulnerable to this sort of hack. The iPhone OS, in general, is also immune to this hack. On jailbroken iPhones, SSH is installable with a package from Cydia that allows you to connect to your phone and make changes to the filesystem.

 

(Source: TUAW News)

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TUAW News

Thursday, November 12, 2009 6:14:42 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Australian internet provider BigPond has become the latest internet company to be targeted by hackers on Twitter, after one of its accounts was hijacked as part of a phishing scam.

Affected users received a private message from BigPondTeam saying "Hey, look at this," and directing them to follow a link that asked them to enter their Twitter password. The attack was part of an attempt to steal their credentials and potentially gain access to other services they use - such as their bank accounts or email services.

 

(Source: Guardian)

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Guardian

Thursday, November 12, 2009 5:54:28 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, November 10, 2009

THE next world war could take place in cyberspace, the UN telecommunications agency chief has warned. "The next world war could happen in cyberspace and that would be a catastrophe. We have to make sure that all countries understand that in that war, there is no such thing as a superpower,'' Hamadoun Toure said.

"Loss of vital networks would quickly cripple any nation, and none is immune to cyberattack,'' added the secretary-general of the International Telecommunications Union during the ITU's Telecom World 2009 fair in Geneva. As the internet becomes more linked with daily lives, cyberattacks and crimes have also increased in frequency, experts said.

 

(Source: News.com)

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News.com

Tuesday, November 10, 2009 10:59:27 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, November 09, 2009

Spain says Internet-related child pornography has risen tenfold in the past five years. Francisco Villanueva of the Interior Ministry says the number of cases has gone from 108 in 2004 to 1,024 last year. Other Internet-related crimes also rose.

Villanueva said Thursday that hacking has risen from 92 to 447 cases, and that bank fraud has more than doubled in the same period, from 509 cases to 1,954. He says piracy of intellectual property decreased slightly from 330 to 298 cases, but that if more resources are not dedicated to policing piracy, Spain could lose up to 300,000 jobs. Villanueva says Spain's cyber crime levels are similar to those of neighboring European countries.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Monday, November 09, 2009 4:42:31 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Pedophiles can exploit virus-infected PCs to remotely store and view their stash without fear they'll get caught. Pranksters or someone trying to frame you can tap viruses to make it appear that you surf illegal Web sites. Whatever the motivation, you get child porn on your computer — and might not realize it until police knock at your door.

An Associated Press investigation found cases in which innocent people have been branded as pedophiles after their co-workers or loved ones stumbled upon child porn placed on a PC through a virus. It can cost victims hundreds of thousands of dollars to prove their innocence.

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Monday, November 09, 2009 3:45:58 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, November 05, 2009

China has issued rules banning the beating and confinement of youths being treated for Internet addiction after revelations of abuse at rehabilitation clinics, including the death of one teenager. The regulations posted on the health ministry's website Wednesday stressed that restraint must be used in dealing with such youngsters as "the concept of 'Internet addiction' has not been fully defined".

In August, the beating death of a teenage boy enrolled by his parents at an Internet addiction camp in southern China's Guangxi region provoked outrage across the country.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Thursday, November 05, 2009 5:53:45 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Internet users throughout Europe accused of illegal file-sharing are to receive more protection from being cut off by their service provider. The European Parliament and Council is due to make a decision on its Telecoms Reform Package in late November. The package will entitle users in all 27 EU states to be put through a "fair and impartial procedure" before being disconnected.

The outcome is a compromise agreed during all night negotiations. Some members of the European Parliament felt nobody should lose their connection until after they had been prosecuted in a court for illegally downloading content.

 

(Source: BBC)

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BBC

Thursday, November 05, 2009 5:24:25 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, November 04, 2009

An expert on cable modem hacking has been arrested by federal authorities on computer intrusion charges. According to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Ryan Harris, 26, ran a San Diego company called TCNISO that sold customizable cable modems and software that could be used to get free Internet service or a speed boost for paying subscribers.

Hackers have known for years that certain models of cable modem, such as the Motorola Surfboard 5100, can be hacked to run faster on a network, a process known as uncapping.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Wednesday, November 04, 2009 12:05:53 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, November 03, 2009

China's police chief has called for a reinforced nationwide Internet security system, in the nation's latest effort to oversee the activities of the world's largest online population.

"The Internet is developing quickly, there are many loopholes in social management, and maintaining social stability faces unprecedented new challenges," public security minister Meng Jianzhu said in rare public remarks. Internet use has expanded at a dizzying pace in China, which now has the world's largest online population of at least 338 million users.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Tuesday, November 03, 2009 6:28:46 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, November 02, 2009

If your cash card gets eaten by the automated-teller machine, it may not end up in the hands of a bank employee. European financial institutions are seeing a sharp rise in card "trapping," where criminals use various tricks in order to capture and retrieve a person's ATM card for fraudulent use.

For the first half of this year, financial institutions reported 1,045 trapping incidents, according to a new report from the European ATM Security Team (EAST), a nonprofit group composed of financial institutions and law enforcement. The figure, which covers 20 countries within the Single Euro Payments Area (SEPA), represents a 640 percent increase over the first half of 2008.

 

(Source: CIO)

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CIO

Monday, November 02, 2009 1:53:06 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     |