International Telecommunication Union   ITU
 
 
Site Map Contact us Print Version
 Monday, November 02, 2009

If your cash card gets eaten by the automated-teller machine, it may not end up in the hands of a bank employee. European financial institutions are seeing a sharp rise in card "trapping," where criminals use various tricks in order to capture and retrieve a person's ATM card for fraudulent use.

For the first half of this year, financial institutions reported 1,045 trapping incidents, according to a new report from the European ATM Security Team (EAST), a nonprofit group composed of financial institutions and law enforcement. The figure, which covers 20 countries within the Single Euro Payments Area (SEPA), represents a 640 percent increase over the first half of 2008.

 

(Source: CIO)

Full story

CIO

Monday, November 02, 2009 1:53:06 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, October 30, 2009

Twitter warned users Tuesday of a new phishing scam on the social networking site. It's the latest in a series of scams that have plagued the site over the past year, designed to trick victims into giving up their user names and passwords.

"We've seen a few phishing attempts today, if you've received a strange DM and it takes you to a Twitter login page, don't do it!," Twitter wrote on its Spam message page. The message reads, "hi. this you on here?" and includes a link to a fake Web site designed to look like a Twitter log-in page. After entering a user name and password, victims enter an empty blogspot page belonging to someone named NetMeg99.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

Full story

ComputerWorld

Friday, October 30, 2009 1:39:29 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Facebook outlined changes to its privacy policy on Thursday and asked for feedback from the social network's more than 300 million users. Members will have until November 5 to send in their comments about the proposed changes.

"This is the next step in our ongoing effort to run Facebook in an open and transparent way. After the comment period is over, we'll review your feedback and update you on our next steps." Some of the changes to Facebook's privacy policy are the result of pressure from Canada, whose privacy czar conducted an investigation into its handling of personal information.

 

(Source: AFP)

Full story

AFP

Friday, October 30, 2009 10:21:03 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, October 29, 2009

I am advised to "avoid giving my credit card online" and to be "careful when banking online" and to use random, complex passwords that I never repeat and never write down. So, as long as I refrain from commerce, stay indoors and have a superhuman memory, I should be fine!

I worry about identity theft and take measures, throughout the year, to defend my identity. So here's some identify defense advice that's actually practical: * Don't sign credit cards. I sign mine "See ID". Why give a card thief my signature too?

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

Full story

ComputerWorld

Thursday, October 29, 2009 2:19:16 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

The 17-year-old’s body was dumped in a ditch after she sneaked out of her home on Sunday night to meet a boy she thought was 16, but who turned out to be 32. Her mother, Andrea Hall urged, “Tell your kids to be careful on the internet. Don't trust anybody and don't put your children on Facebook or other sites if they are under age. All we ask now is that people help the police in any way they can. We don't want any other child to be a victim.”

A 32-year-old man, of no fixed abode was due to appear at Newton Aycliffe Magistrates Court on Wednesday, charged with manslaughter and kidnap. The convicted sex offender was also charged with failing to notify a new address as required for sex offenders under the Sexual Offences Act 2003.

 

(Source: Telegraph)

Full story

Telegraph

Thursday, October 29, 2009 11:39:02 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Nearly a decade after it introduced a program to internationalize domain names, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers is expected to take another step on Friday. ICANN, during its annual meeting in Seoul, Korea, will vote on the internationalized domain names (IDN) initiative, better known as the Fast Track.

"In Seoul, we plan to move forward to the next step in the internationalization of the Internet, which means that eventually people from every corner of the globe will be able to navigate much of the online world using their native language scripts," said Rod Beckstrom, ICANN's CEO.

 

(Source: NewsFactor)

Full story

NewsFactor 

Wednesday, October 28, 2009 11:54:03 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

A man is being questioned after the body of a teenager he is believed to have met on the internet was discovered in a field in County Durham.

Det Ch Insp Paul Harker said the case highlighted the dangers of meeting people on the internet, and urged parents to monitor their children's online habits. He said: "This is a very, very unusual event. My message in terms of meeting people from the internet is 'please do not do it unless you are absolutely certain it is safe'." He added: "Speak to them about it, speak to their friends, let them know the dangers of the internet."

 

(Source: BBC)

Full story

BBC 

Wednesday, October 28, 2009 11:35:08 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 27, 2009

The Swiss Foreign Ministry says it was the victim of a "professional" cyber attack aimed at obtaining information from its computer network. Spokesman Georg Farago says the ministry cut the connection between its network and the Internet after the attack was discovered on Thursday. He says specialists are trying to determine the source of the attack and whether any information was stolen.

Farago said Monday it appeared the Foreign Ministry was specifically targeted. Switzerland frequently plays host to international peace talks and other high-level negotiations.

 

(Source: AP)

Full story

AP

Tuesday, October 27, 2009 2:49:40 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Developing countries risk missing out on the benefits of information technology because of their lack of broadband infrastructure, a U.N. agency said.

Lack of broadband Internet access deprives countries of the possibility of building up offshoring industries, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) said in a report late on Thursday. It also prevents people from tapping into all the advantages of mobile phones, whose use is exploding in poor countries. "What is known as the broadband gap for example is becoming a serious handicap for companies in many poor countries," he told a briefing to launch UNCTAD's Information Economy Report.

 

(Source: Reuters)

Full story

Reuters 

Tuesday, October 27, 2009 11:19:48 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, October 26, 2009

The Internet is set for its biggest technical change in decades when a new multilingual address system is approved this week, a global regulatory body said Monday.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) said it would declare an end to the exclusive use of Latin characters for website addresses on Friday -- the final day of its six-day conference in Seoul. When the change comes into force, it will be possible to use characters from other languages -- such as Chinese, Arabic, Korean and Japanese -- for a full Internet address, instead of for just part of an address as now.

 

(Source: AFP)

Full story

AFP

Monday, October 26, 2009 3:55:31 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Nigeria's anti-corruption police is working with Microsoft to halt thousands of fraudulent emails in a crackdown on internet crime in Africa's most populous country, an agency spokesman said.

The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) said on Thursday its new project "Eagle Claw," expected to become fully operational within six months, is aimed at improving Nigeria's tarnished image as one of the world's top countries for internet crime. The agency said it has already shut down 800 scam websites and arrested 18 people.

 

(Source: Reuters)

Full story

Reuters 

Monday, October 26, 2009 3:35:36 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Networks of hacked computers are being used more than ever to click on advertisements, a scam known as click fraud that cheats search engines, publishers and ad networks out of revenue.

For the third quarter of the year, 42.6% of fraudulent clicks came from botnet-infected computers, according to Click Forensics, a company that produces tools to detect and filter out fraudulent clicks. The figure is the highest in four years, when Click Forensics began producing reports. For the same quarter a year ago, botnets accounted for 27.5% of bad clicks. Botnets are a powerful tool for hackers.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

Full story

ComputerWorld

Monday, October 26, 2009 12:15:55 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, October 23, 2009

China is building its cyberwarfare capabilities and appears to be using the growing technical abilities to collect U.S. intelligence through a sophisticated and long-term computer attack campaign, according to an independent report.

Released Thursday by a congressional advisory panel, the study found cases suggesting that China's elite hacker community has ties to the Beijing government, although there is little hard evidence. The Pentagon report described computer attacks believed to have originated in China, but concluded that "it remains unclear if these intrusions were conducted by, or with the endorsement of, the PLA or other elements of the PRC (People's Republic of China) government."

 

(Source: AP)

Full story

AP

Friday, October 23, 2009 3:16:50 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

The European Parliament has given the green light for member states to cut persistent file-sharers off from the net. It has dropped an amendment to its Telcoms Package which would have made it hard for countries to cut off pirates without court authority. It follows pressure from countries keen to adopt tough anti-piracy laws.

The French government has just approved plans which could see pirates removed from the net for up to a year. The UK's file-sharing policy is also likely to include a clause about disconnecting persistent offenders. The European Parliament was originally opposed to such legislation, claiming internet access was a basic human right.

 

(Source: BBC)

Full story

BBC 

Friday, October 23, 2009 2:28:47 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, October 22, 2009

It is being billed as the largest-ever social change event on the Web and one which its organizers believe will unite the digital world in a wider conversation about climate change.

"I would say that 99 percent of our bloggers have never written about climate change before. I think there is a lot of power in people who usually don't write about this having conversations about a major issue like climate change." The scale of involvement in the day has been impressive. So far, over 8,000 blogs have registered in 144 countries and organizers predict that there will be around 15 million readers.

 

(Source: CNN)

Full story

CNN

Thursday, October 22, 2009 3:59:59 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

The Republic of Montenegro officially became a member of the International Multilateral Partnership against Cyber Threats (IMPACT), which is established under the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and consists of 191 members. The President of the Board of Directors of IMPACT -Mr. Datuk Muhd Noor Amin- welcomed Montenegro's membership in IMPACT and stated that Montenegro acquired the status of a full member in this international organization.

Montenegro has recently acquired the capability to track new information on cyber threats. More particularly, the participation in IMPACT will assist Montenegro in the identification of cyber threats in the early stages of their development.

 

(Source: eGov Monitor)

Full story

eGov Monitor

Thursday, October 22, 2009 9:23:59 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Microsoft admitted Hotmail users had been tricked into revealing their passwords, 10,000 of which had been published online.

The spam is being sent from users' accounts to contacts in their address books - so recipients will think it came from one of their friends. While the new spam is not malicious in itself, it does point the contact in the direction of something that is — a "shopping" website. The trick is, the shopping site is not a real one. The scam persuades victims to order goods online by credit card, leaving them vulnerable to identity theft and fraud.

 

(Source: Fox News)

Full story

Fox News

Wednesday, October 21, 2009 10:26:38 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Hotmail and several other Web e-mail providers were recently hit by phishing attacks that gleaned usernames and passwords.It's terribly insecure, but the string of digits 1234567 is a popular password on Hotmail, according to security researcher Bogdan Calin, who analyzed 9,843 stolen Windows Live Hotmail passwords that were posted on a Web site.

In a blog post, Calin said the following were the most common passwords in the Hotmail collection: 123456, 123456789, alejandra, 111111, alberto, tequiero, alejandro and 12345678.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

Full story

ComputerWorld

Wednesday, October 21, 2009 9:39:23 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Surfing the Internet just might be a way to preserve your mental skills as you age. Researchers found that older adults who started browsing the Web experienced improved brain function after only a few days.

"You can teach an old brain new technology tricks," said Dr. Gary Small, a psychiatry professor. With people who had little Internet experience, "we found that after just a week of practice, there was a much greater extent of activity particularly in the areas of the brain that make decisions, the thinking brain -- which makes sense because, when you're searching online, you're making a lot of decisions," he said. "It's interactive."

 

(Source: Health Day)

Full story

Health Day

Tuesday, October 20, 2009 1:56:36 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

A 15-year-old girl who posted her profile on a vampire website was allegedly murdered by two men who created a "fictional internet alter-ego" a court heard.

Carly Ryan's body was found by a swimmer on an Australian beach in 2007. Yesterday a father and son appeared before the South Australian supreme court accused of setting a trap that led to her alleged murder. The girl posted personal details and photographs of herself on the Gothic website www.vampirefreaks.com and soon began an internet romance with a fictitious teenager called Brandon.

 

(Source: Telegraph)

Full story

Telegraph

Tuesday, October 20, 2009 1:39:00 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, October 19, 2009

The founder of lastminute.com, Martha Lane Fox, has unveiled an ambitious policy to get everyone in Britain online by 2012, backed by a study that says it would save the government up to £1bn annually in customer service costs and boost the economy by more than £20bn.

Lane Fox, who is now chair of the government-created Digital Inclusion Task Force, says that getting the 10m Britons who have never used the internet to go online could generate at least £22.6bn in economic benefit – including at least £10.6bn over the lifetimes of the 1.6m children who have never used it.

 

(Source: Guardian)

Full story

Guardian

Monday, October 19, 2009 10:06:43 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Tens of millions of U.S. computers are loaded with scam security software that their owners may have paid for but which only makes the machines more vulnerable, according to a new Symantec report on cybercrime.

Cyberthieves are increasingly planting fake security alerts that pop up when computer users access a legitimate website. The "alert" warns them of a virus and offers security software, sometimes for free and sometimes for a fee. "Lots of times, in fact they're a conduit for attackers to take over your machine. They'll take your credit card information, any personal information you've entered there and they've got your machine,"

 

(Source: Reuters)

Full story

Reuters 

Monday, October 19, 2009 9:12:43 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, October 16, 2009

It’s the F word question that all parents now dread. “Can I go on Facebook?” your eleven year-old bullies you over dinner, declaring that absolutely everybody else in her class is not only on Facebook, but also on Twitter as well as Bebo and Orkut and other peculiarly named social networks.

So how should parents in today’s social media age deal with the F word question? Is social networking bad for children’s brains? Should we allow our kids to freely expose their identities on the Internet?

 

(Source: Telegraph)

Full story

Telegraph

Friday, October 16, 2009 10:26:31 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Cyber-crime just doesn't pay like it used to. Security researchers say the cost of criminal services such as distributed denial of service, or DDoS, attacks has dropped in recent months. The reason? Market economics.

Criminals have gotten better at hacking into unsuspecting computers and linking them together into so-called botnet networks, which can then be centrally controlled. Botnets are used to send spam, steal passwords, and sometimes to launch DDoS attacks, which flood victims' servers with unwanted information.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

Full story

ComputerWorld

Friday, October 16, 2009 10:22:28 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, October 15, 2009

A survey of 16 to 24 year olds has found that 75% of them feel they "couldn't live" without the internet. The report, published by online charity YouthNet, also found that four out of five young people used the web to look for advice.

About one third added that they felt no need to talk to a person face to face about their problems because of the resources available online. The survey looked at how the web influences the well-being of people aged between 16 and 24.

 

(Source: BBC)

Full story

BBC 

Thursday, October 15, 2009 1:29:49 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Internet users in the North East of England have the most nervous attitude towards the web, according to research that highlights the country's "digital divide".

Online engagement will soon replace social class as the most powerful determiner of economic success, damaging the career prospects of internet refuseniks, according to the social anthologist who analysed the survey. Nearly one-third (31 per cent) of in the North East are reluctant to use the internet for anything more than sending email and occasional browsing, higher than the national average of 23 per cent.

 

(Source: Telegraph)

Full story

Telegraph

Thursday, October 15, 2009 1:19:36 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Twitter users should refrain from changing their log-in data until further notice or else risk getting locked out of their accounts. Twitter is investigating instances of users who have lost access to their accounts after modifying their usernames, passwords or e-mail addresses, the microblogging company said on Tuesday.

Until the problem is resolved, Twitter users shouldn't modify their log-in data, according to an official posting on Twitter's Status Web site. "This seems to affect new users as well as long term users," the note reads.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

Full story

ComputerWorld

Wednesday, October 14, 2009 2:05:05 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Studies on whether mobile phones can cause cancer, especially brain tumors, vary widely in quality and there may be some bias in those showing the least risk, researchers reported on Tuesday. So far it is difficult to demonstrate any link, although the best studies do suggest some association between mobile phone use and cancer, the team led by Dr. Seung-Kwon Myung of South Korea's National Cancer Center found.

Myung and colleagues at Ewha Womans University and Seoul National University Hospital in Seoul and the University of California, Berkeley, examined 23 published studies of more than 37,000 people in what is called a meta-analysis.

 

(Source: Reuters)

Full story

Reuters 

Wednesday, October 14, 2009 1:43:55 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     |