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 Thursday, October 22, 2009

It is being billed as the largest-ever social change event on the Web and one which its organizers believe will unite the digital world in a wider conversation about climate change.

"I would say that 99 percent of our bloggers have never written about climate change before. I think there is a lot of power in people who usually don't write about this having conversations about a major issue like climate change." The scale of involvement in the day has been impressive. So far, over 8,000 blogs have registered in 144 countries and organizers predict that there will be around 15 million readers.

 

(Source: CNN)

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CNN

Thursday, October 22, 2009 3:59:59 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

The Republic of Montenegro officially became a member of the International Multilateral Partnership against Cyber Threats (IMPACT), which is established under the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and consists of 191 members. The President of the Board of Directors of IMPACT -Mr. Datuk Muhd Noor Amin- welcomed Montenegro's membership in IMPACT and stated that Montenegro acquired the status of a full member in this international organization.

Montenegro has recently acquired the capability to track new information on cyber threats. More particularly, the participation in IMPACT will assist Montenegro in the identification of cyber threats in the early stages of their development.

 

(Source: eGov Monitor)

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eGov Monitor

Thursday, October 22, 2009 9:23:59 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Microsoft admitted Hotmail users had been tricked into revealing their passwords, 10,000 of which had been published online.

The spam is being sent from users' accounts to contacts in their address books - so recipients will think it came from one of their friends. While the new spam is not malicious in itself, it does point the contact in the direction of something that is — a "shopping" website. The trick is, the shopping site is not a real one. The scam persuades victims to order goods online by credit card, leaving them vulnerable to identity theft and fraud.

 

(Source: Fox News)

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Fox News

Wednesday, October 21, 2009 10:26:38 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Hotmail and several other Web e-mail providers were recently hit by phishing attacks that gleaned usernames and passwords.It's terribly insecure, but the string of digits 1234567 is a popular password on Hotmail, according to security researcher Bogdan Calin, who analyzed 9,843 stolen Windows Live Hotmail passwords that were posted on a Web site.

In a blog post, Calin said the following were the most common passwords in the Hotmail collection: 123456, 123456789, alejandra, 111111, alberto, tequiero, alejandro and 12345678.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Wednesday, October 21, 2009 9:39:23 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Surfing the Internet just might be a way to preserve your mental skills as you age. Researchers found that older adults who started browsing the Web experienced improved brain function after only a few days.

"You can teach an old brain new technology tricks," said Dr. Gary Small, a psychiatry professor. With people who had little Internet experience, "we found that after just a week of practice, there was a much greater extent of activity particularly in the areas of the brain that make decisions, the thinking brain -- which makes sense because, when you're searching online, you're making a lot of decisions," he said. "It's interactive."

 

(Source: Health Day)

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Health Day

Tuesday, October 20, 2009 1:56:36 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

A 15-year-old girl who posted her profile on a vampire website was allegedly murdered by two men who created a "fictional internet alter-ego" a court heard.

Carly Ryan's body was found by a swimmer on an Australian beach in 2007. Yesterday a father and son appeared before the South Australian supreme court accused of setting a trap that led to her alleged murder. The girl posted personal details and photographs of herself on the Gothic website www.vampirefreaks.com and soon began an internet romance with a fictitious teenager called Brandon.

 

(Source: Telegraph)

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Telegraph

Tuesday, October 20, 2009 1:39:00 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, October 19, 2009

The founder of lastminute.com, Martha Lane Fox, has unveiled an ambitious policy to get everyone in Britain online by 2012, backed by a study that says it would save the government up to £1bn annually in customer service costs and boost the economy by more than £20bn.

Lane Fox, who is now chair of the government-created Digital Inclusion Task Force, says that getting the 10m Britons who have never used the internet to go online could generate at least £22.6bn in economic benefit – including at least £10.6bn over the lifetimes of the 1.6m children who have never used it.

 

(Source: Guardian)

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Guardian

Monday, October 19, 2009 10:06:43 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Tens of millions of U.S. computers are loaded with scam security software that their owners may have paid for but which only makes the machines more vulnerable, according to a new Symantec report on cybercrime.

Cyberthieves are increasingly planting fake security alerts that pop up when computer users access a legitimate website. The "alert" warns them of a virus and offers security software, sometimes for free and sometimes for a fee. "Lots of times, in fact they're a conduit for attackers to take over your machine. They'll take your credit card information, any personal information you've entered there and they've got your machine,"

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters 

Monday, October 19, 2009 9:12:43 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, October 16, 2009

It’s the F word question that all parents now dread. “Can I go on Facebook?” your eleven year-old bullies you over dinner, declaring that absolutely everybody else in her class is not only on Facebook, but also on Twitter as well as Bebo and Orkut and other peculiarly named social networks.

So how should parents in today’s social media age deal with the F word question? Is social networking bad for children’s brains? Should we allow our kids to freely expose their identities on the Internet?

 

(Source: Telegraph)

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Telegraph

Friday, October 16, 2009 10:26:31 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Cyber-crime just doesn't pay like it used to. Security researchers say the cost of criminal services such as distributed denial of service, or DDoS, attacks has dropped in recent months. The reason? Market economics.

Criminals have gotten better at hacking into unsuspecting computers and linking them together into so-called botnet networks, which can then be centrally controlled. Botnets are used to send spam, steal passwords, and sometimes to launch DDoS attacks, which flood victims' servers with unwanted information.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Friday, October 16, 2009 10:22:28 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, October 15, 2009

A survey of 16 to 24 year olds has found that 75% of them feel they "couldn't live" without the internet. The report, published by online charity YouthNet, also found that four out of five young people used the web to look for advice.

About one third added that they felt no need to talk to a person face to face about their problems because of the resources available online. The survey looked at how the web influences the well-being of people aged between 16 and 24.

 

(Source: BBC)

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BBC 

Thursday, October 15, 2009 1:29:49 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Internet users in the North East of England have the most nervous attitude towards the web, according to research that highlights the country's "digital divide".

Online engagement will soon replace social class as the most powerful determiner of economic success, damaging the career prospects of internet refuseniks, according to the social anthologist who analysed the survey. Nearly one-third (31 per cent) of in the North East are reluctant to use the internet for anything more than sending email and occasional browsing, higher than the national average of 23 per cent.

 

(Source: Telegraph)

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Telegraph

Thursday, October 15, 2009 1:19:36 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Twitter users should refrain from changing their log-in data until further notice or else risk getting locked out of their accounts. Twitter is investigating instances of users who have lost access to their accounts after modifying their usernames, passwords or e-mail addresses, the microblogging company said on Tuesday.

Until the problem is resolved, Twitter users shouldn't modify their log-in data, according to an official posting on Twitter's Status Web site. "This seems to affect new users as well as long term users," the note reads.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Wednesday, October 14, 2009 2:05:05 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Studies on whether mobile phones can cause cancer, especially brain tumors, vary widely in quality and there may be some bias in those showing the least risk, researchers reported on Tuesday. So far it is difficult to demonstrate any link, although the best studies do suggest some association between mobile phone use and cancer, the team led by Dr. Seung-Kwon Myung of South Korea's National Cancer Center found.

Myung and colleagues at Ewha Womans University and Seoul National University Hospital in Seoul and the University of California, Berkeley, examined 23 published studies of more than 37,000 people in what is called a meta-analysis.

 

(Source: Reuters)

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Reuters 

Wednesday, October 14, 2009 1:43:55 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 13, 2009

About a third of UK employees throw sensitive documents in the bin instead of shredding them, research suggests. The study also found almost three-quarters of workers felt their organisations could do more to protect their customers' sensitive information.

The data was compiled for National Identity Fraud Prevention Week. Identity fraud costs the UK more than £1.2bn annually. The UK's Fraud Prevention Service says 60,000 people have fallen victim so far this year.

 

(Source: BBC)

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BBC 

Tuesday, October 13, 2009 4:43:52 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Facebook has seen an impressive bump in traffic versus this time last year. For September 2009, the site claimed 58.6 percent of U.S. social networking tracking, a jump of 194-percent over the same period last year. Twitter's increase, meanwhile, was downright absurd, jumping 1,170 percent over the past year.

In September 2008, Facebook recorded a 19.94 share, which increased to 58.59 percent for Sept. 2009. MySpace, by contrast, dominated the social-networking sites last September, with a 66.8 percent share. Since then, however, MySpace's market share has plunged to 30.3 percent, still leaving it second in U.S. traffic.

 

(Source: PC Magazine)

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PC Magazine

Tuesday, October 13, 2009 4:29:28 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Monday, October 12, 2009

For the fourth time this year, Adobe has admitted that hackers used malicious PDF documents to break into Windows PCs.

The bug in the popular Reader PDF viewer and the Acrobat PDF maker is being exploited in "limited targeted attacks," Adobe said yesterday. That phrasing generally means hackers are sending the rigged PDF documents to a short list of users, oftentimes company executives or others whose PCs contain a treasure trove of confidential information.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Monday, October 12, 2009 2:54:32 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Security researchers are warning that Web-based applications are increasing the risk of identity theft or losing personal data more than ever before.

The best defense against data theft, malware and viruses in the cloud is self defense, researchers at the Hack In The Box (HITB) security conference said. But getting people to change how they use the Internet, such as what personal data they make public, won't be easy.

 

(Source: PCWorld)

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PCWorld 

Monday, October 12, 2009 2:15:17 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, October 09, 2009

Scammers have grabbed the Hotmail passwords that leaked to the Web and are using them in a plot involving a fake Chinese electronics seller to bilk users out of cash and their credit card information, a security researcher said.

"We've seen a 30% to 40% increase in these types of spam messages in the last several days," said Patrik Runald, senior manager of Websense's security research team. "By 'these types of spam,' I mean messages that are advertising great consumer electronics bargains, such as cameras and computers."

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Friday, October 09, 2009 2:08:26 PM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

1. There's always a friend's computer. 2. They're a form of censorship. 3. They give you a false sense of security. 4. Kids resent them -- and you. 5. Kids can defeat them. 6. They catch too much. 7. They don't catch everything.

Most parental control programs use a combination of filtering techniques to block access to unwanted sites. But each method is vulnerable, and none promises 100% accuracy. Text-based filters can't really determine the context of words or phrases, so they can block access to perfectly acceptable sites. Words like "sucking," for example, might get caught in the filter and prevent your kid from researching, say, mosquitoes.

 

(Source: Common Sense)

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Common Sense

Friday, October 09, 2009 9:43:22 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Meet "network man." He has basic desires of his own, but has many arbitrary preferences, such as in music or clothes, that have been influenced by the people he knows. Network man's likes and dislikes, in turn, affect the behavior of his friends, and their friends, and their friends.

People have profound influences on each other's behavior within three degrees of separation, the authors find. That means that your friends, your friends' friends, and your friends' friends' friends may all affect your eating habits, voting preferences, happiness, and more. At the fourth degree, however, the influence substantially weakens.

 

(Source: CNN)

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CNN

Friday, October 09, 2009 9:32:31 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

The head of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation has stopped banking online after nearly falling for a phishing attempt. FBI Director Robert Mueller said he recently came "just a few clicks away from falling into a classic Internet phishing scam" after receiving an e-mail that appeared to be from his bank.

In phishing scams, criminals send spam e-mails to their victims, hoping to trick them into entering sensitive information such as usernames and passwords at fake Web sites.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Friday, October 09, 2009 8:08:12 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Thursday, October 08, 2009

IPhone lovers and other smartphone users should take heed: A security researcher showed ways to spy on a BlackBerry user during a presentation Wednesday, including listening to phone conversations, stealing contact lists, reading text messages, taking and viewing photos and figuring out the handset's location via GPS.

And ironically, Sheran Gunasekera, head of research and development at ZenConsult, said the BlackBerry is one of the most secure smartphones available, in some ways better than the iPhone.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Thursday, October 08, 2009 9:44:01 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

Investigators in the United States and Egypt have smashed a computer "phishing" identity theft scam described as the biggest cyber-crime investigation in US history, officials said Wednesday.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation said 33 people were arrested across the United States early Wednesday while authorities in Egypt charged 47 more people linked to the scam. A total of 53 suspects were named in connection with the scam in a federal grand jury indictment, the FBI said.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Thursday, October 08, 2009 9:28:26 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Wednesday, October 07, 2009

Privacy and security are foundational to health care reform. Patients will trust electronic health care records only if they believe their confidentiality is protected via good security.

As vice chairman of the federal Healthcare Information Technology Standards Committee, I have been on the front lines in the debate over the standards and implementation guidance needed to support the exchange of health care information. Over the past few months, I've learned a great deal from the committee's privacy and security workgroup.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Wednesday, October 07, 2009 10:33:29 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

The social networking site said that its security teams had noticed an increase in scams where people's login information is collected through phishing sites, and then their accounts are accessed without permission to ask friends for money.

"While the total number of people who have been impacted is small, we take any threat to security seriously and are redoubling our efforts to combat the scam," The attacks, known as 419 scams, involve a fraudster accessing Facebook accounts and posing as the account owner.

 

(Source: Telegraph)

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Telegraph

Wednesday, October 07, 2009 9:40:19 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Tuesday, October 06, 2009

Microsoft blocked access to thousands of Hotmail accounts in response to hackers plundering password information and posting it online.

Cyber-crooks evidently used "phishing" tactics to dupe users of Microsoft's free Web-based email service into revealing account and access information, according to the US technology giant. Phishing is an Internet bane and involves using what hackers refer to as "social engineering" to trick people into revealing information online or downloading malicious software onto computers.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Tuesday, October 06, 2009 10:56:48 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

In a somewhat unusual data breach, hackers recently stole the login credentials of an unknown number of customers of payroll processing company PayChoice Inc., and then attempted to use the data to steal additional information directly from the customers themselves.

Hackers broke into the site and managed to access the real legal name, username and the partially masked passwords used by customers to log into the site. They then used the information to send very realistic looking phishing e-mails to PayChoice's customers directing them to download a Web browser plug-in to be able to continue using the onlineemployer.com service.

 

(Source: ComputerWorld)

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ComputerWorld

Tuesday, October 06, 2009 9:59:37 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 
 Friday, October 02, 2009

US Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Thursday that her department has received the green light to hire up to 1,000 cybersecurity experts over the next three years.

Kicking off "National Cybersecurity Awareness Month," she said the new recruits would "help fulfill the department's broad mission to protect the nation's cyber infrastructure, systems and networks." "Effective cybersecurity requires all partners -- individuals, communities, government entities and the private sector -- to work together to protect our networks and strengthen our cyber resiliency," Napolitano said.

 

(Source: AFP)

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AFP

Friday, October 02, 2009 11:44:23 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     | 

"We were at a restaurant for my mom's birthday. I looked over and there are my daughter and my oldest son texting, holding their phones under the table," said the mom of four in Lewiston, Idaho. "I just came unglued. I was like, `Are you kidding? You're at your grandma's birthday party. Put those phones away now!'"

We all know teens love their gadgets — more for texting than talking. But the devices are posing some new challenges for parents. How can they teach their tech-savvy kids some electronic etiquette? So far, parents are learning on the fly, imposing new rules for their young offenders such as "no texting at dinner."

 

(Source: AP)

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AP

Friday, October 02, 2009 10:21:46 AM (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #     |