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 Friday, February 01, 2008

The recent Internet outage has left the experts speculating that there may be greater demand for telecom capacity in the future. Reports indicated difficulty with receiving data sent from the United States to countries affected by the cable damage with an average 50% increase in the time it takes to download Web sites and a 10% decrease in the availability of Web sites overall, Keynote Systems said. Abelardo Gonzalez, a product manager at Keynote, believes the damaged cable incident will spur many global companies to think about new ways of staying connected to the Web in case of emergencies. He adds that companies should look into having backup connectivity through multi-honing their ISPs or even through having a satellite uplink for last-resort connections.

The damage to the cables has raised concerns about future incidents in which a greater number of cables could experience more significant levels of destruction. Paul Polishuk, the president and chairman of the board of the IGI Group of Companies, says one problem with many of the underwater cable systems is that many of the cables join together at shared landing points that could leave large swathes of telecom infrastructure vulnerable to potential terrorist attacks. Andrew Odlyzko, the director of the University of Minnesota's Digital Technology Center, shares Polishuk's concern about the cables' vulnerability and thinks that any significant damage to cables at major landing points would have serious economic consequences as evident on the 2006 earthquakes that severely disrupted Taiwan's Internet access.

Read the full article on Network World.