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 Tuesday, November 27, 2007

USA Today reports on the current spam statistics, and reiterates how spam continues to exponentially increase despite anti-spam softwares, filters and legislations. According to market researcher IDC, "the total number of spam e-mail messages sent worldwide, 10.8 trillion, will surpass the number of person-to-person e-mails sent, 10.5 trillion." Spam sent is also said to have reached 60 billion to 150 billion messages a day. As for phishing, the Anti-Phishing Working Group said new phishing sites soared to 30,999 as of July 2007, from 14,191 in July 2006. MessageLabs adds that one in 87 e-mails is tagged as phishing scams now, compared with one in 500 a year ago.

The fight against spam has nonetheless expanded and grown too. Built-in spam defenses of Google's Gmail, social-networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace which enable users to control who has access to their personal profile, to exchange e-mail with friends, family and business associates, and phishing filters provided by Microsoft on its Internet Explorer browser are some of the common filters made available to users. In the same effort to stop spam, Yahoo, eBay and PayPal recently announced their use of DomainKeys, an e-mail-authentication technology. Other anti-spam technologies include CertifiedEmail from Goodmail Systems, a new breed of e-mail services, and Boxbe. "The multilayered-defense approach has worked to stop such scourges as image spam, which varied the content of individual messages through colors, backgrounds, picture sizes or font types to slip through spam filters. Image spam made up half of all spam in January. Since software makers came up with a solution, image spam has dropped to 8% of all spam, Symantec says."

Read the full article here.